David M. Lesser, Fine Antiquarian Books LLC

 New York Antiquarian Book Fair 2013

April 11-14, 2013

 

1.   Adams, John: A DEFENCE OF THE CONSTITUTIONS OF GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AGAINST THE ATTACK OF M. TURGOT IN HIS LETTER TO DR. PRICE...IN THREE VOLUMES. A NEW EDITION. London: Printed for John Stockdale, 1794. 3 volumes: port. frontis, [2], 8, xxxii, [3]-392; [2], 451, [1]; [2], 528, [36] pp. Light private rubberstamp on front free endpaper of each volume. Volume I has the portrait frontis, which is somewhat foxed in the margins. Bound in contemporary tree calf, expertly rebacked with original spines laid down and original gilt-lettered black morocco spine labels. Gilt spine bands. Light foxing, Very Good.

 

     The book was first published in London in 1787 as a single volume, just as the Constitutional Convention assembled in Philadelphia. This is Adams's completed work and final edition. "John Adams, it is safe to say, bestowed more thought on the nature of government, and exerted more influence in determining the character of the constitutions adopted during the Revolution by most of the original states, than any one of his contemporaries. When, therefore, Turgot attacked these constitutions because of 'an unreasonable imitation of the usages of England,' and because of a want of centralization, it was natural that Adams should come forward as their champion" [Larned].

     The Defence "has ably combated the opinions of Turgot, Mably, and Price, who were in favour of a single Legislative Assembly, and by it has contributed much towards establishing that division of power in our Legislative Assemblies, with its proper checks and balances, which we now enjoy. His accounts of other republics and their governments, are accurate and well drawn, and show the author to have been a man of extensive reading, and well acquainted with his subject." Marvin.

Howes A60aa. I DAB 77. Larned 2687. Sabin 235. BEAL 2735.

   (29409)                                                                                                                     $6,000.00

 

2.   Adler, Cyrus: CATALOGUE OF THE LEESER LIBRARY. COMPILED BY CYRUS ADLER, A.B. Philadelphia: [Press of Edward Hirsch & Co.], 1883. 65, [3 blanks] pp. Stitched in modern plain wrappers. Light uniform toning, Near Fine.

 

     Rabbi Leeser bequeathed his Library to the Hebrew Education Society of Philadelphia. "A few additions have been made by the Society." The text is printed in two columns per page, in English and Hebrew type, and in [English] alphabetical order. The officers of the Hebrew Education Society are listed, including Adler, D. Sulzberger, Mayer Sulzberger [as an executor of Leeser's estate], Jacob Sulzberger, Isaac Mayer, and others. The name of S.B. Fleisher has been laid down on paper over the name of his presumed predecessor.

     In his masterly bibliography Yosef Goldman, quoting Adler, writes, "The library, consisting of some 2,400 volumes of Judaica and Hebraica, was probably the richest private and institutional library of its time. It is a collection steeped in historical associations. Many of Leeser's contemporaries sent him autographed copies. This collection is extremely abundant in early Jewish Americana, and includes over fifty items of unrecorded Jewish Americana."

Goldman 249. Singerman 3168.    (29493)                                                                 $750.00

 

3.   [Agriculture and Trades]: SELECT ESSAYS: CONTAINING: THE MANNER OF RAISING AND DRESSING FLAX, AND HEMP. ALSO, THE WHOLE METHOD OF BLEACHING OR WHITENING LINEN-CLOTH. LIKEWISE, OBSERVATIONS ON THE MANAGEMENT OF COWS AND SHEEP...COLLECTED FROM THE DICTIONARY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, AND FROM VARIOUS MODERN AUTHORS. Philadelphia: Printed, by Robert Bell..., 1777. [6], 159, [1] pp, plus folding plate [outer blank corner torn]. Pages 97-104 misnumbered 79-86, as issued. Printed on pale blue paper. Lacking the half title, disbound with some loosening. Else Very Good

 

     Several of these "Essays are translated from a Periodical Work, published at Paris, under the Title of Journal Oeconomique, the Translation being undertaken By Doctor Tobias Smollett, an Author of great Reputation..." This is the book's first edition, and the only printing recorded on OCLC. The title describes the subjects covered: cultivating, raising, and dressing flax and hemp; paper making; bleaching linen; "An account of the Nettle Thread;" "A remedy against Rottenness in Sheep"; protecting plants "from the ravages of the game and insects that feed upon them." 

FIRST EDITION. Evans 15597. Rink 1097. Sabin 78985. Hildeburn 3631.   (29105)

                                                                                                                        $2,500.00

 

4.   Alabama: REPORT OF THE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE TO WHOM WAS REFERRED THE "RESOLUTION OF INQUIRY" INTO ALLEGED "ILLEGAL USE, OR UNLAWFUL APPLICATION OF THE PUBLIC MONEY, OR ANY PART OF THE SCHOOL FUND FOR MOBILE COUNTY, OR OTHER PUBLIC FUND." Montgomery, Alabama: John G. Stokes & Co., State Printers, 1870. 7, [1 blank] pp. Stitched in original printed green wrappers. Light old folds, wrappers lightly spotted, Very Good. Contemporary inscription at head of front wrapper, "Respects of G. Horton | Mobile." A Bostonian who had moved to Mobile as a young man, Horton was Mayor of Mobile at this time. Previously he had been an advocate of public education and had served on Mobile's school board. During the Civil War, he was jailed for Unionist sympathies. During Reconstruction his advocacy of civil rights placed his life in constant danger.

 

     The Report is a chapter in Alabama's bitter Reconstruction strife. It attacks Dr. N.B. Cloud, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, who was regarded by unreconstructed Alabamans as a Scalawag for his support of Reconstruction and the Republican Party. The Report also attacks G.L. Putnam, whom Cloud had named Mobile's superintendent of education, an appointment which other Mobile educators refused to recognize. Cloud brokered a compromise-- for which he lacked authority-- by making Putnam superintendent of Emerson College [known as the 'Blue School'], a Negro school run by the American Missionary Association. The Report accuses Cloud and Putnam of illegally diverting public funds to the support of the Blue School.

Ellison 1597. OCLC locates five copies, as of November 2012, under two accession numbers.

   (29538)                                                                                                         $350.00

 

5.   [Alaska Mining Promotional]: CAPTAIN JACK CRAWFORD, "THE POET SCOUT," IN HIS WONDERFUL ENTERTAINMENTS, "THE CAMP FIRE AND THE TRAIL." THE ONLY ENTERTAINMENT OF ITS KIND ON EARTH. GLOWING PICTURES OF THE BEAUTIFUL BORDERLAND. RECITATIONS OF HIS OWN QUAINT POEMS. THRILLING STORIES OF LIFE IN CAMP AND FIELD...TWO HOURS OF RARE ENJOYMENT. NOTHING LIKE HIM EVER SEEN BEFORE. NOTHING LIKE HIM WILL EVER BE SEEN AGAIN. [New York?: 1897]. Broadsheet, 9 1/2" x 12". With a small, oval half-tone portrait. On recto, at the bottom, printed in red: 'Norton Hall, Granville, N.Y., Thursday Eve., Dec. 30, 1897". Near Fine.

 

     A rare announcement of a public entertainment-- "Not a Lecture. But a Budget of Jewels, Sparkling, Pathetic, Humorous and Original"-- by this popular Western hero who, on his first outing as a reporter in 1875, did much to promote the Black Hills Gold Rush. John W. Crawford [1847-1917] was a "poet-scout" who memorialized Custer and Wild Bill Hickok in verse. He "was one of the original discoverers of gold on French Creek, in the Black Hills, in 1876." After a stint with Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, which he left when he accidentally shot himself in the groin [blaming it on Buffalo Bill's drinking], he moved to New Mexico to scout for the Army against the Apache. He "did more than any other man in the Territory in bringing before the public the immense mineral wealth of New Mexico."

     This broadsheet serves not only to publicize Captain Jack's Entertainment, but also to promote "The Capt. Jack Crawford Alaska Prospecting and Mining Co." Testimonials to Crawford are printed here, along with an invitation for the recipient to receive a Company prospectus.

OCLC 778631567 [1- Yale] [as of November 2012].    (29536)                   $750.00

 

6.   Almanac: POOR WILL'S POCKET ALMANAC, FOR THE YEAR 1782. Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by Joseph Crukshank, [1781]. 12mo. 24pp plus blank interleaves, in contemporary stiff, decorated paper boards. Front free endpaper loose, one blank interleaf torn, covers lightly to moderately worn but bound tightly. Very Good.

 

     Calendar, eclipses, Quaker meetings, Pennsylvania court sessions, scale of depreciation, interest tables, tide tables, table of the value and weight of coins, and a table of roads from and to Philadelphia.

Evans 17082. Drake 10135. NAIP w032704 [7]. Hildeburn 4144.      (28808)         $600.00

 

7.   American Anti-Slavery Society: [FIVE ANTI-SLAVERY TRACTS: NOS. 5, 11, 12, 15, 17]. New York: Published, for Gratuitous Distribution, at the Office of the American Anti-Slavery Society, [1855-1860]. All with caption title, as issued; paginated variously. Stitched, except No. 17 is loose. Light wear, each with a small rubberstamp. Good+.

 

     The Tracts are: John G. Palfrey, The Inter-State Slave Trade; Charles E. Hodges, Disunion our Wisdom and our Duty; [Anti-Slavery Poems, beginning with, 'Where is thy Brother?']; Susan C. Cabot, What Have We, as Individuals, to do with Slavery?; Rev. Charles Beecher, The God of the Bible Against Slavery.

Dumond 10.   (30048)                                                                                                            $250.00

 

8.   American Society for Meliorating the Condition of the Jews: THE FIRST REPORT OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR MELIORATING THE CONDITION OF THE JEWS, PRESENTED MAY 9, 1823. WITH AN APPENDIX. New York: Printed for the Society by Gray and Bunce., 1823. 48pp, light to moderate foxing. Bound in modern, attractive blue cloth with gilt-lettered spine title on red morocco. Good+.

 

     The first report of this Society, "organized on the 8th day of February, 1820, and incorporated by the Legislature of the State of New York, on the 14th of the subsequent April." It has spent the last two years in a survey of "this vast untrodden field of the future victories of the Lord." The Jews, this "wonderful people," will signal "the purposes of God" by "their conversion to Christianity." The key to the Society's efforts is "Mr. Jadownicky, a converted Jew, as a special agent from a benevolent nobleman in Germany." The Report chronicles the establishment of societies "in different sections of our country, for promoting the conversion of the Jews," the hopeful signs of progress, financial matters, and the Addresses delivered at the annual meeting.

     Officers are listed, including John Quincy Adams. A list of auxiliary societies is printed.

FIRST EDITION. Rosenbach 232. 131 Eberstadt 390.    (29573)                            $350.00

 

9.   [Amicus] [pseud.]: THE REBEL STATES. THE PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS. RECONSTRUCTION, AND THE EXECUTIVE POWER OF PARDON. New York: E.S. Dodge & Co., Steam Printers, 1866. Original printed wrappers [lightly chipped], stitched, 15pp. Clean text, Good+.

 

     Amicus prints a powerful dissent from President Andrew Johnson's policy of Reconstruction, particularly his single-handed assumption of power and his issuance of wholesale pardons to former Confederates. Johnson, who had attracted Lincoln's attention for his bravery as wartime Union Governor of Tennessee, did not dislike slavery nearly so much as he resented upper-class plantation owners, who had mocked his lowly upbringing. Once these men groveled at his feet for pardons, the President became compliant in their hands. Amicus argues that Congress has the power to determine the requirements for readmission of States to the Union, and that his issuance of pardons before conviction of crime is unconstitutional.

     Johnson has unconstitutionally "undertaken to carry out the laws respecting Treason, and to wash the bloody hands of conquered rebels, whether repentant or not, and to place them upon a par with loyal citizens-- the survivors of the many thousands who have been maltreated and murdered, or inhumanly starved to death by the agents of these same States who had confederated together and levied war against the United States!"

FIRST EDITION. Bartlett 4014.    (29971)   $250.00

 

10.   Amistad: MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, TRANSMITTING, IN COMPLIANCE WITH A RESOLUTION OF THE SENATE, COPIES OF CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO THE NEGROES TAKEN ON BOARD THE SCHOONER AMISTAD. [Washington: 1841]. SD179. 26th Cong., 2d Sess. 29pp. Disbound with light scattered foxing, else Very Good.

 

     The Message transmits material on the Amistad incident, with diplomatic notes in Spanish [and English translations]. The Spanish minister argues that only a Spanish court may try Cinque and his fellows who, as captives on the slave ship Amistad, had mutinied and killed some officers and crew. "I have not only claimed the captured slaves as the property of Spanish subjects, but, as the representative of the Spanish Government, I ask for their surrender as assassins, in order that they may be tried by competent courts."

     The Minister attempts to rebut an article by William Jay in the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Reporter. There are anxious references to the pending case in the U.S. Supreme Court, which would decide that Cinque and the Africans should be freed. As of February 2013, OCLC locates eleven copies under two accession numbers.

   (29849)         $350.00

 

11.   Arkansas: ACTS PASSED AT THE EIGHTH SESSION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE TERRITORY OF ARKANSAS:  WHICH WAS BEGUN AND HELD AT THE TOWN OF LITTLE ROCK, ON MONDAY, THE SEVENTH DAY OF OCTOBER, AND ENDED ON SATURDAY, THE SIXTEENTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND THIRTY-THREE. Little Rock: Printed by William E. Woodruff, Printer to the Territory, 1834. 119, [1 blank], [3], [1 blank] pp. Stitched, bit of blank inner margin wear. Later plain rear wrapper. Light foxing, some toning, untrimmed. Lower margin of second leaf trimmed closely, affecting a couple of letters. Good+.

 

     Scarce Arkansas territorial laws, with an Index of the Acts at the end of the book.

Allen 32. Not in Marke, Cohen, Harv. Law Cat. OCLC 6178622 [4], 613365360 [2] [as of August 2012].

   (29185)         $950.00

 

12.   Arkansas: ACTS PASSED AT THE THIRD SESSION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF ARKANSAS;  WHICH WAS BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CAPITOL, IN THE CITY OF LITTLE ROCK, ON MONDAY, THE SECOND DAY OF NOVEMBER, [1840]; AND ENDED ON MONDAY, THE TWENTY-EIGHTH DAY OF DECEMBER, [1840]. Little Rock: Printed by George H. Burnett, Printer to the State, 1840. v, [3 blanks],  118, ix, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, remnants along spine of original wrappers, else Near Fine. 

 

     With Table of Contents and Index. This early Session passed laws regulating the State Bank, and creating and regulating turnpike companies, private and public corporations [including Little Rock], railroads; and enacting laws concerning taxation, the judiciary, and other subjects, including one statute permitting aliens to own stock in a corporation. Allen notes that, despite the imprint date, these Acts were actually printed in 1841.

Allen 83. Babbitt 17.    (29903)          $450.00

 

13.   Arkansas: JOURNAL OF THE CONVENTION OF DELEGATES OF THE PEOPLE OF ARKANSAS, ASSEMBLED AT THE CAPITOL, JANUARY 4, 1864; ALSO, JOURNALS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE SESSIONS OF 1864, 1864-65, AND 1865. Little Rock: Price & Barton, State Printers, 1870. 58, [2 blanks], 309, [3 blanks], 67, [1 blank] pp. Title page lightly worn, with light rubberstamp, release stamp on blank verso. Contemporary buckram [institutional stamping of spine], inner hinges cracked. Clean text. Overall, Good+, with the text Very Good.

 

     This is the first printing of each of these Journals. The Convention was called by Unionist elements in Arkansas to create a government loyal to the United States, under President Lincoln's '10 per cent plan' of Reconstruction. The proposed Constitution was, as its drafters explained, "simply your old Constitution, with some few amendments, according to the most approved free State constitutions. Slavery is forever prohibited." Secession was repudiated. Voters are urged, "If you believe the reconstruction of the State Government and the restoration of the Federal Union will be the best means of restoring peace and prosperity to our bleedings State, go to the election on Monday, the 14th day of March next, and vote to adopt the Constitution we submit." Eligible voters, who were required to swear allegiance to the Union, adopted this Constitution.

     The Unionist House Journals denounce Secession, which Governor Murphy's Address calls a "strange insanity." He denounces the Rebellion, and warns against the "inordinate appetite for revenge and plunder." The Governor blesses the extinction of slavery, and wanrs of "rebel bands wnadering therough the State, murdering and robbing the people." The House prescribes the appropriate loyalty oath to the Federal Government, and places the State on the road to Reconstruction.

Allen 584.    (29890)   $500.00

 

14.   Arkansas: REVISED STATUTES OF THE STATE OF ARKANSAS, ADOPTED AT THE OCTOBER SESSION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF SAID STATE, A.D. 1837... REVISED BY WILLIAM McK. BALL AND SAM. C. ROANE| NOTES AND INDEX BY ALBERT PIKE. Boston: Weeks, Jordan and Company, 1838. xv, [1 blank], 956 pp, with the half title. A rubberstamp on blank portion of title page, else a pristine text. Very Good plus, in later buckram [title and institutional stamp on spine].

 

     Pike asserts, "In no State was ever such a revision more imperatively called for, more needful for the common weal." The laws had been "an unseemly and incongruous superstructure," with "crude and incongruous laws, hatched in prolific brains." These are the State's first revised statutes, organized alphabetically by subject and providing a window on the activities and concerns of this Frontier State. Arkansas entered the Union in 1836.

     A Code for "Negroes and Mulattoes" is included, with a definition of the latter term.

As in a number of other States, "No free negro or mulatto shall hereafter be permitted to emigrate to or settle in this State" without posting a bond for his support and good behavior. The detailed Index consumes about 150 pages. The Laws are preceded by the U.S. and Arkansas Constitutions, the Treaty of Cession of Louisiana, the Act of Admission of Arkansas, the supplementing Compact and its acceptance, and Pike's Preface.

I Harv. Law Cat. 69. Not in Cohen.   (29901)           $850.00

 

15.   Ashcroft, John: ASHCROFT'S RAILWAY DIRECTORY FOR 1862; CONTAINING AN OFFICIAL LIST OF ALL THE OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS OF THE RAIL-ROADS IN THE UNITED STATES & CANADAS, TOGETHER WITH THEIR FINANCIAL CONDITION AND AMOUNT OF ROLLING STOCK. COMPILED FROM OFFICIAL REPORTS. New York: [John W. Amerman, Printer], 1862. Original publisher's cloth [with a new spine; light cover wear], title stamped in gilt on front cover; 'Adams Express Company. Eastern, Western & Southern Express Forwarders' gilt-stamped on rear cover. 211, [26] pp. Clean text. Very Good.

 

     The book presents all the information promised by the title, with numerous railroad-related advertisements, some illustrated, including a folded half-page illustrated advertisement at the end for Grice & Long's Steam Passenger Car. This was Ashcroft's first Railway Directory, issued annually through 1870. 

Sabin 2176 [1866 Directory]. Not in Bureau of Railway Economics bibliography.   (29685)           $450.00

 

16.   Atkinson, Thomas: PRIMARY CHARGE OF THE RT. REV THOMAS ATKINSON, BISHOP OF NORTH CAROLINA, TO THE CLERGY, DELIVERED AT THE CONVENTION AT WARRENTON, MAY, 1855. PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE CONVENTION. Fayetteville: Printed by Edward J. Hale & Son, 1855. 16pp, disbound. Moderately foxed. Good+.

 

     Atkinson observes that the Episcopal Church is composed primarily of "professional men, merchants in the more extensive lines of business, the larger land-holders, the retired men of fortune, official persons." The Church has not reached many of the poor, "the mechanics, the petty shop-keepers," or small farmers. "Where, at the South, are the overseers" or "our own slaves? Others are taking care of their souls, or they go uncared for. Surely this ought not to be; this must not continue."

Thornton 448.   (29594)          $250.00

 

17.   Aubin, Penelope: THE NOBLE SLAVES. BEING AN ENTERTAINING HISTORY OF THE SURPRISING ADVENTURES, AND REMARKABLE DELIVERANCES, FROM ALGERINE SLAVERY, OF SEVERAL SPANISH NOBLEMEN AND LADIES OF QUALITY. New York: Printed and sold by John Tiebout, 1800. iv, [5]-139pp. Original quarter sheep with marbled boards [rubbed]. Title page clipped with loss of first word of title ['The'], lacks free endpapers. Lightly toned and foxed. Good+. Early ownership signature, 'Deborah R. Allen.'

 

     Ms. Aubin was an English novelist. The adventures she describes here occur in Turkey and the Near East, where the locals seek to ensnare virtuous Englishwomen. This is the third American printing of this popular work; earlier editions issued from Danbury in 1797 [housed, apparently, only at the American Antiquarian Society] and New Haven in 1798 [known in only three locations]. This edition is also quite scarce: NAIP locates it only at AAS, Brown, and Yale.

Evans 36861. NAIP w013868 [3].    (28930) $375.00

 

18.   Ayer, Lewis M.: SOUTHERN RIGHTS AND THE CUBAN QUESTION. AN ADDRESS, DELIVERED AT WHIPPY SWAMP, ON THE FOURTH OF JULY, 1855. BY GEN. LEWIS M. AYER. PUBLISHED BY THE PEOPLE TO WHOM IT WAS DELIVERED. Charleston: Printed by A.J. Burke, 1855. 23, [1 blank] pp. Toned and tided, Good to Good+.

 

     Always eager to sever ties with the Union, Ayer would serve as a delegate to South Carolina's secession convention after Lincoln's election, and as a representative in the Confederate Congress. His July 4 Address repudiates the "absurd impression" that American liberty depends on "the union of the States, and the particular form of government under which that union now exists." This false notion has "contributed largely to the subversion of State sovereignty." In fact, the American Union "has proved to be the source of unnumbered ills-- a full-charged Pandora's box."  

     In Ayer's view, secession in 1860 was ten years late: the right time was after the 1850 Compromise. Disappointed that the Compromise took the wind out of secession's sails, Ayer warns Southern imperialists against acquiring Cuba. Just as the Mexican Cession fell under Yankee control so, if the United States acquires Cuba, "enterprising Yankees would crowd into Cuba for its commercial and manufacturing advantages; and they would, should it be acquired, control and shape its policy to the exclusion of Slavery." 

III Turnbull 195. OCLC locates five copies, some of which may be reproductions, as of December 2012.

   (29659)         $275.00

 

19.   [Bacon, Thomas and William Meade]: SERMONS ADDRESSED TO MASTERS AND SERVANTS, AND PUBLISHED IN THE YEAR 1743, BY THE REV. THOMAS BACON, MINISTER OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN MARYLAND. NOW REPUBLISHED WITH OTHER TRACTS AND DIALOGUES ON THE SAME SUBJECT, AND RECOMMENDED TO ALL MASTERS AND MISTRESSES TO BE USED IN THEIR FAMILIES, BY THE REV. WILLIAM MEADE. Winchester, Va: John Heiskell, Printer , [1813]. vi, 238pp Original full sheep [some rubbing]. Light to moderate foxing, heavy spotting at pages 146-147; leaf 87-88 bound out of sequence between pages 92/93. Front free endpaper excised; subsequent blank with neat rectangular excision from top half. Presentation copy from Reverend William Meade, the compiler of this work, the future Episcopal Bishop of Virginia, and a founder of the Colonization Society. Two contemporary inscriptions dated 1824 and 1827. Good+.

 

     Bacon, who had been Minister of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Maryland, published these sermons in London in 1749-1750, including two which he had preached to a congregation of Maryland slaves. Bishop Meade, persuaded that slaves required religious instruction, arranged for their publication in 1813. He also caused to be published here a variety of other material for that purpose: the most interesting of these is a piece entitled 'A Dialogue,' which includes an early appearance of the character of 'Sambo'.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. LCP 762. Haynes 860. 133 Eberstadt 928. Not in Sabin, Work, Blockson.

   (30030)         $500.00

 

20.   Bankruptcy Law: S. 369.  IN SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES JUNE 12, 1840. MR. CRITTENDEN, FROM THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE SUBJECT, REPORTED THE FOLLOWING BILL... TO ESTABLISH A UNIFORM SYSTEM OF BANKRUPTCY THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. [Washington: 1840]. 26th Cong., 1st Sess. Folio, stitched and untrimmed as issued. 21, [3 blanks] pp, with numbered text lines. A couple of small margin fox spots, generously margined. Fine.

 

     The historic federal Bankruptcy Act of 1841 was enacted after unprecedented commercial failures during the Panic of 1837. A relief measure, it was the first to permit voluntary bankruptcies. More than a generation had passed since the first Bankruptcy Act in 1800 and its repeal in 1803. The 1800 law had authorized creditors to place the debtor in bankruptcy and seize his assets; but it had not allowed debtors to choose bankruptcy. This 1840 Bill, which passed the Senate but was tabled in the House, was revived in the 27th Congress and passed in 1841. Its innovation, permitting voluntary bankruptcy petitions by persons "owing debts," tracks the 1841 Act, which was based on Congress's power to establish "uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies." Only two years after its enactment, charges of corruption and profligate expenditures, and at least one lower court's decision that the Act was unconstitutional, led to the Act's repeal.   (24319)     $750.00

 

21.   Bartley, T[homas] W[elles]: BEFORE A MILITARY COMMISSION, CINCINNATI, O., APRIL 11, 1865. THE UNITED STATES VS. BUCKNER S. MORRIS, AND OTHERS. ARGUMENT OF T.W. BARTLEY, TOUCHING THE QUESTION OF JURISDICTION, AND OTHER LEGAL QUESTIONS. Cincinnati: Moore, Wilstach & Baldwin, Printers, [1865]. 61, [1] pp. Original printed blue wrappers [some scoring at extremities], stitched. Light dampstaining throughout text, else Good+.

 

     Judge Buckner S. Morris [1800-1879], a former mayor of Chicago and former Circuit Court Judge, strongly opposed the Civil War. He was treasurer of the arguably treasonous Sons of Liberty, and actively participated in its anti-Union agenda. Military authorities arrested and held him in 1864 for conspiring to seize Camp Douglas, to free Confederate prisoners of war, and "to lay waste and destroy the city of Chicago".

     He was tried before a Military Tribunal in Cincinnati, near the end of the War. Thomas W. Bartley [1812-1885], former governor of Ohio and former Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court, challenged the jurisdiction of the military commission, which is constitutionally empowered only to administer military law. By contrast, Morris "is a citizen of the city of Chicago, Illinois, far removed from the pending conflict of arms; and it has never been proclaimed, or made known, that any insurrection had actually occurred, or that a war actually existed in the State of Illinois." Moreover, the "civil courts, both State and Federal, have been at all times open and unobstructed."  After the War the U.S. Supreme Court adopted this reasoning and restricted the jurisdiction of military tribunals. In any event, Morris was found not-guilty and released from military custody.

Not in Bartlett, Harv. Law Cat., Marke. OCLC locates seven copies under two accession numbers, as of March 2013.

   (29860)         $250.00

 

22.   Baseball Publishing Company: THE "BULL" DURHAM BASEBALL GUIDE 1911. PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE BASEBALL PUBLISHING CO. SECOND YEAR. Boston: 1911. Original printed and illustrated wrappers [tape-reinforced at spine, light dusting, small scuff to surface of front cover at the area of baseball pitcher's knee]. 127, [1] pp. Original staples, wrappers separating from the text. Otherwise Very Good and profusely illustrated. 

 

     The first edition of the second Bull Durham baseball guide. Its prefatory remarks 'To the Fans' claim it as "by far the best publication of such a nature that has ever been presented to the baseball public." A complete rundown of each game of the 1910 World Series is presented; statistics on every aspect of the 1910 season are set forth. Included, in addition to the American and National Leagues, is material on the minor leagues: the American Association, Eastern League, Pacific Coast League, etc., even including Class D leagues. The Guide prints the Official Baseball Rules, baseball records, attendance figures and other information, and the 1911 baseball schedules for the leagues.

OCLC 8633760 [the series- 10], as of February 2013.

   (25945)         $450.00

 

23.   Baylies, Francis: A NARRATIVE OF MAJOR GENERAL WOOL'S CAMPAIGN IN MEXICO, IN THE YEARS 1846, 1847 & 1848. Albany: Little & Company [Joel Munsell, Printer], 1851. 78, [2 blanks] pp, plus lithographed engraving frontis of General Wool with his facsimile signature. Original printed wrappers, stitched. Light to moderate foxing, else Very Good.

 

     Baylies's Narrative is one of the most significant and reliable sources for Wool's campaign during the Mexican War, particularly the Chihuahua Expedition, the capture of Saltillo, and the Battle of Buena Vista. He draws on government documents and participants' first-hand accounts. For this work Baylies interviewed Wool; he includes valuable information on Wool's activities in Texas and northern Mexico.

FIRST EDITION. Howes B262. Munselliana 512. 111 Eberstadt 358.

   (29657)         $500.00

 

24.   Beecher, Catharine E.: AN ESSAY ON SLAVERY AND ABOLITIONISM, WITH REFERENCE TO THE DUTY OF AMERICAN FEMALES. Philadelphia: Henry Perkins; Perkins & Marvin, Boston; L. Ashmead and Co., Printers, 1837. 12mo. 152pp. Original cloth with gilt title on front cover  [light rubbing], spine spotted with some wear and label remnants. Title stamped in gilt on front cover, 'Miss Beecher on the Slave Question.' Light scattered foxing, rubberstamp at foot of title page. Signed "N. Shotwell's" at head of title page, probably Nathan Shotwell, a Presbyterian minister in antebellum Virginia and North Carolina, and post-war Tennessee. Good+.

 

     Harriet Beecher Stowe's older sister rebuts Angelina Grimke's anti-slavery Appeal to the Christian Women of the South. She explains, "It seems unwise and inexpedient for ladies of the non-slave-holding States to unite themselves in Abolition Societies." First, the North and South are "distinct communities, with different feelings and interests." Attempts of one section to persuade the other, on an issue of morality, are bound to make things worse. Second, the methods of Abolitionists are not "either peaceful or christian in tendency" and "generate party spirit, denunciation, recrimination, and angry passions." She contrasts the anti-religious spirit of Garrison with the gentle Christianity of the English abolitionists Wilberforce and Clarkson. A second edition also issued in 1837.

FIRST EDITION. Dumond 25. Sabin 4290. AI 43129 [5]. LCP 1014. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Work, Blockson, Schomburg.

   (29311)         $750.00

 

25.   Benezet, Anthony: THE PLAINNESS AND INNOCENT SIMPLICITY OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION. WITH ITS SALUTARY EFFECTS, COMPARED TO THE CORRUPTING NATURE AND DREADFUL EFFECTS OF WAR. WITH SOME ACCOUNT OF THE BLESSING WHICH ATTENDS ON A SPIRIT INFLUENCED BY DIVINE LOVE, PRODUCING PEACE AND GOOD-WILL TO MEN. COLLECTED BY ANTHONY BENEZET. Philadelphia: Joseph Crukshank, 1782. 12mo, 48pp. Disbound and lightly worn, Good+.

 

     The great Quaker educator and anti-slavery reformer proclaims the "power of God to salvation, operating, through obedience, in the minds of the sincere hearted...Indians, Negroes, and others, even those esteemed of the lowest order, by no means excepted." Benezet argues the futility of war, citing the example of Pennsylvania: "So long as the government continued chiefly in the hands of a people principled against war, notwithstanding their exposed situation, the great number of Indians within their borders, and the several warlike nations which surrounded them, they experienced the protecting hand of providence, and enjoyed an uninterrupted tranquillity for more than sixty years; whilst Canada, and most of the other colonies who pursued different measures, suffered dreadfully from their Indian neighbors."

FIRST EDITION. Evans 17472. Hildeburn 4183.

   (29061)         $450.00

 

26.   Benezet, Anthony: SOME HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF GUINEA, ITS SITUATION, PRODUCE AND THE GENERAL DISPOSITION OF ITS INHABITANTS. WITH AN INQUIRY INTO THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE SLAVE TRADE, ITS NATURE AND LAMENTABLE EFFECTS. ALSO A RE-PUBLICATION OF THE SENTIMENTS OF SEVERAL AUTHORS OF NOTE, ON THIS INTERESTING SUBJECT; PARTICULARLY AN EXTRACT OF A TREATISE, BY GRANVILLE SHARP. Philadelphia: Joseph Crukshank, 1771. Contemporary full sheep with raised spine bands [rubbed] and old manuscript spine label. Contemporary manuscript signatures of Robert Durfee on endpapers. [6], iv, 144, 53, [6] pp [as issued]. Light scattered foxing, bookplate of prominent Americanist Michael Zinman. Very Good.

 

     This is the first edition of Benezet's landmark study of Guinea and the slave trade. It "gave to Thomas Clarkson his first facts on the slave trade, and was the source of the impulse to begin his long and active protest against it" [DAB]. Benezet's preface explains his purpose: "Some account will be here given of the different parts of Africa, from which the Negroes are brought to America; with an impartial relation from what motives the Europeans were first induced to undertake, and have since continued this iniquitous traffic." Those motives "were concerned in reaping the gain of this infamous traffic." Sabin notes four reprintings during the 1770's and 1780's.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 11985. Sabin 4689. Work 257. Blockson 10074. Hampton 774.

   (29822)         $1,850.00

 

27.   Benjamin, Judah P.: SPEECH OF HON. J.P. BENJAMIN, OF LA., ON THE KANSAS QUESTION. DELIVERED IN THE SENATE MAY 2, 1856. [Washington?: 1856]. 15, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, else Very Good.

 

     Benjamin's growing sense that the South was becoming a beleaguered minority caused him to abandon his Whig roots. "On May 2, 1856, he made a speech in the Senate on the Kansas Bill and confessed himself a Democrat. He became an ardent partisan of Buchanan, that year, and on the expiration of his term in the Senate was returned for a new term by his new friends." DAB. The second Jew to serve in the Senate, after David Yulee of Florida, Benjamin was the South's most articulate spokesman for the constitutionality of the Southern Rights position during the 1850's. Here he expresses regret that the South acceded to the Missouri Compromise of 1820, a measure which was "contrary to the true theory of the constitution, irreconcilable with a just regard to the principle of equality among the States, and...totally inadequate to the end proposed-- of producing perfect harmony upon the subject of a division between the different secrtions of the confederacy..."

     Benjamin rejects the power of Congress to exclude slavery-- and hence southerners with their slave property-- from the Territories. Moreover, even if such a power is to be inferred, it has been unconstitutionally abused by northern majorities. Indeed, "In every case where the framers of the constitution foresaw any temptation which would induce a majority from one section of the Union to legislate for their own exclusive advantage, they have expressly prohibited such an abuse in order to preserve equality between the States."

Sabin 4707. LCP 1098.   (29423)       $750.00

 

28.   Benjamin, Judah P.: SPEECH OF J.P. BENJAMIN, OF LOUISIANA, ON THE NEBRASKA AND KANSAS BILL. DELIVERED IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES, MAY 25, 1854. [Washington: Towers, Printer, 1854]. 7, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, minor wear, else Very Good.    

 

     After David Yulee of Florida, Judah Benjamin of Louisiana was the second Jew to serve in the United States Senate. He took his seat on March 4, 1853. This is one of his earliest speeches as Senator. The sectional struggle over the Kansas-Nebraska Act caused  Benjamin, here speaking as a member of the Whig Party, to support repeal of the Missouri Compromise, which had divided slave territory from free territory, and the pro-slavery policies of the Democratic Party. He would soon officially become a Southern Rights Democrat.

     Benjamin argues that the Missouri Compromise Line had harmed the country. The Line "as effectually separates the sections of the Confederacy as if it were a wall of adamant. When gentlemen from the South approach their friends from the North, on reaching this line, they are repulsed." Moreover, speaking as the brilliant lawyer that he was, he argues that the Missouri Compromise Line is unconstitutional: "A cardinal principle of our fathers was that the Congress of the United States had no right to legislate upon the subject of slavery at all." Abolishing this artificial Line, as the Kansas-Nebraska Act proposed, would enshrine the basic principle of American liberty-- local self-government. Each territory would be free to decide for itself whether to permit slavery within its borders.

Not in LCP, Sabin, or Cohen. OCLC 17568043 [2- Tulane, Norfolk Pub. Lib.][as of July 2012].

   (29141)         $750.00

 

29.   Berry, Philip: A REVIEW OF THE MEXICAN WAR ON CHRISTIAN PRINCIPLES: AND AN ESSAY ON THE MEANS OF PREVENTING WAR. Columbia, S.C.: Printed by A.S. Johnston, 1849. ix, [1 blank], 87, [1 blank] pp. Original printed salmon wrappers [edge-chipped, a couple of small holes, detached from text block]. Stitched, a clean text. Except for the condition of the wrappers, Very Good. With the ownership signature of William Jenks; heavy paper laid down on blank verso of front wrapper with inscription, 'Rev. Dr. Jenks | Boston.' Jenks was a Harvard graduate who taught at Bowdoin as a young man, moved to Boston, and opened the first free chapel for seamen there. He was active in the Society for the Religious and Moral Instruction of the Poor.

 

     Berry's essay, highly critical of President Polk's commencement of the War, was reprinted from the Southern Presbyterian Review. This is its first separate publication. Berry was minister at Magdalene College, a Presbyter of the Diocese of Maryland. Reviewing in detail the parties' conflicting claims, he charges Polk with deliberately provoking hostilities in order to detach Texas, California, and the southwest from Mexico. "Such was the origin and commencement of the Mexican war ... a war that might ... have been avoided by the United States, had they been so disposed, probably without diminution of an inch of territory, certainly without detriment to their soil or their people, or even what is called their honour - a war, consequently, which no degree of political justice (in the ordinary sense of the expression,) could morally justify." Tutorow observes that Berry "finds fault with both sides for going to war."

Not in Turnbull. Tutorow 4165. Sabin 4993.   (29787)          $275.00

 

30.   Birney, James: CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN THE HON. F.H. ELMORE, ONE OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA DELEGATION IN CONGRESS, AND JAMES G. BIRNEY, ONE OF THE SECRETARIES OF THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY. HUMAN RIGHTS. EXTRA. [New York: American Anti-Slavery Society. S.W. Benedict, Publishing Agent, 1838]. Folio, 8pp, folded. Moderately foxed, caption title [as issued]. Good+.

 

     The rare, eight-page folio printing of this Correspondence, ordinarily seen only in octavo format as the Anti-Slavery Examiner No. 8. Birney, the Kentucky anti-slavery reformer, answers in detail a number of questions from Elmore about the Anti-Slavery Society: its adherents, the number of its branches, its goals. Birney provides a detailed justification of the Society's activities and methods. Unlike the Garrisonians, Birney favored action in the political arena; he would run for President on the Liberty Party ticket. "A published letter to Representative F.H. Elmore of South Carolina, in response to a request for information regarding anti-slavery organizations, separated him still farther from the Garrisonians by establishing his position as an upholder of the Federal Constitution." DAB.

OCLC 64546964 [2- Yale, Williams], 23460993 [1- U So. Car.] [as of 6/12]. Other bibliographies record only the Anti-Slavery Examiner, No. 8: Dumond 10, 27; Work 298; LCP 1219; AI 49295.   (28904)           $450.00

 

31.   Black, Chauncey F.: ADDRESS OF CHAUNCEY F. BLACK, ESQ., BEFORE THE RE-UNION ASSOCIATION OF MONONGALIA ACADEMY, MORGANTOWN, VA.; DELIVERED ON WEDNESDAY EVENING, JUNE 27TH, 1860. Morgantown, Va.: Printed at the Book and Job Office of the Virginia Weekly Star, 1860. 19, [1 blank] pp. Disbound without wrappers, minor foxing, else Very Good.

 

     The Address is a very scarce Virginia [now West Virginia] imprint, by the son of Attorney General Jeremiah Black. Chauncey was not quite twenty-one when he delivered it. Later, Chauncey would be Ward Hill Lamon's ghost-writer for his biography of Lincoln. He would serve as Lieutenant-Governor of Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

Norona 210. OCLC 23686091 [1- U W VA] [as of August 2012]. Not in Haynes.

   (29189)         $250.00

 

32.   [Blaine, James G.]: MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, TRANSMITTING IN ANSWER TO THE RESOLUTION OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF AUGUST 20, 1890, CONCERNING THE ENFORCEMENT OF PROSCRIPTIVE EDICTS AGAINST THE JEWS IN RUSSIA, A REPORT FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE UPON THE SUBJECT. [Washington]: 1890. 51st Cong., 1st Sess. HED470. 142pp. Disbound and uniformly toned, else Very Good.

 

     Secretary of State Blaine's Report conveys information on Russia's "enforcement of proscriptive edicts against the Hebrews of that country, which, it is said, if applied, would result in the expulsion of a large number, estimated at a million or more of Russian Jews." A plethora of testimony, eye-witness reports, and other material, including denials and claims of exaggeration, is presented.

FIRST EDITION. OCLC 4611347 [3- Brandeis, Clements, Princeton] [as of December 2012].

   (29705)         $275.00

 

33.   Board of Civil Engineers: PROCEEDINGS AND ERPORT OF THE BOARD OF CIVIL ENGINEERS CONVENED AT ST. LOUIS, IN AUGUST, 1867, TO CONSIDER THE SUBJECT OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF A RAIL AND HIGHWAY BRIDGE ACROSS THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER AT ST. LOUIS. St. Louis: George Knapp & Co., Printers and Binders, 1867. Original printed salmon wrappers, stitched. 100pp, plus tipped-in errata and three folding sketches. Light dusting and minor wear to wrappers, Very Good. Ownership signature on plain rear wrapper, 'John Goodwin | Lynchburgh | Va'.

 

     An analysis, by the best civil engineers in the country of all the factors involved in bridging the Mississippi River, opening the gates to far easier travel to the West and across the continent. Foundations, piers, superstructure, approaches are all considered carefully and with great rigor. Tables and charts abound.

FIRST EDITION. Sabin 75363.OCLC 1042402 [3- Rens. Poly, St. Louis Pub. Lib., U Saskatchewan] [as of March 2013.

   (30042)         $450.00

 

34.   Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey: AN ADDRESS, FROM THE COUNCIL OF PROPRIETORS OF THE WESTERN DIVISION OF NEW-JERSEY, TO THE OCCUPIERS OF LANDS WITHIN THE ANGLE. TO WHICH ARE ADDED, REMARKS ON THE SAID ADDRESS. BY ARISTIDES. PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. [New Brunswick: George F. Hopkins], 1795. 22, [2 blanks] pp. Stitched. Early library rubberstamp on title page, lightly toned, else a Very Good copy.

 

     Felcone has provided the definitive explanation of the dispute that gave rise to this pamphlet; as well as the identities of Aristides [not William Griffith, as Gaines and Evans supposed, but John Rutherfurd] and the printer [George Hopkins of New Brunswick]. "This pamphlet is the only known product of Hopkins's New Brunswick press other than a handful of surviving issues of his newspaper." Felcone Collection.

     The pamphlet is "part of the last significant pamphlet controversy in the long-standing dispute between the East and West Jersey proprietors over the location of the line dividing the two former provinces and the ownership of the lands within the 'angle' formed by the two disputed lines." Id. The Address explains, ìIt is credibly reported that certain persons (professing to be agents of the Eastern Proprietors) have been conveying lands within the Angle, and selling quit claims to the owners whose titles are founded on West-Jersey rights. To guard against such impositions for the future is the principal object of this publication."

II Streeter Sale 934. Felcone Collection 20. Felcone Bibliography 752. Evans 28773. Gaines 95-01. NAIP w011767

   (29817)         $1,500.00

 

35.   [Board of Trustees of Antietam National Cemetery]: ANTIETAM NATIONAL CEMETERY, SHARPSBURG, MARYLAND. [np: 1865]. 14, [2 blanks] pp. Disbound with caption title [as issued]. Light wear, Good+.

 

     The dedication ceremonies for Antietam National Cemetery occurred in 1867; the State of Maryland appropriated $7,000 for its creation and appointed four trustees, in March 1865. I infer that this pamphlet, reporting on the progress of the acquisition of the cemetery site, probably issued later in 1865 and certainly before 1867. The Trustees "have purchased a suitable lot of ground on the suburbs of Sharpsburg, in sight of Burnside's Bridge, and the headquarters of General McClellan and General Lee, and are now making arrangements to have it substantially enclosed and graded." The pamphlet lists, alphabetically by State, the names of about 2,000 "loyal dead on the field."

OCLC locates seven copies, as of January 2013, under two accession numbers. Not in Sabin or Eberstadt.

   (29780)         $250.00

 

36.   [Bordley, John Beale]: A SUMMARY VIEW OF THE COURSES OF CROPS, IN THE HUSBANDRY OF ENGLAND & MARYLAND; WITH A COMPARISON OF THEIR PRODUCTS; AND A SYSTEM OF IMPROVED COURSES, PROPOSED FOR FARMS IN AMERICA. Philadelphia: Printed by Charles Cist, 1784. 4to. 22, [2 blanks] pp. Stitched, minor wear, Near Fine.

 

     Bordley was a prominent Maryland lawyer and agriculturist, with a sizeable estate on the Wye River. He served as a Judge in Baltimore, as a member of the Maryland-Delaware boundary commission, and as the founder of the first American agricultural society. He was far ahead of his time, farming-wise: he rotated crops, adopted new agricultural techniques with imported machinery, made his own bricks and beer. He wrote several volumes on agriculture, including dairy farming, proper buildings and use of manure, and a correct diet.

     Here Bordley presents his pioneering work on the importance of crop rotation, as practiced in England. "Judge Bordley, one of the most intelligent and successful farmers in America, shared his experience with his fellow-citizens in a series of letters and essays on the benefits of crop rotation, fertilizing fields, use of machinery, even the proper principles on which to build a country house secure from fire and hose-breakers." A Rising People, page 208.

Evans 18373. Rink 1098. Hildeburn 4437.

   (29108)         $2,250.00

 

37.   [Boutwell Report]: ASSASSINATION OF LINCOLN. JULY--, 1866. MR. BOUTWELL, FROM THE COMMITTE ON THE ASSASSINATION OF LINCOLN, MADE THE FOLLOWING REPORT:. [Washington: 1866]. 39th Cong., 1st Sess. HR Rep. No. 104. 41pp. Disbound, Very Good.

 

     The Committee's task was to focus on any role played by Jefferson Davis in the assassination. Boutwell's report concludes, "There is probable cause to believe that he was privy to the measures which led to the commission of the deed," although the government is not yet "in possession of all the facts in the case." The Committee's review of rebel archives discloses a singular brutality and disregard for the laws of war. Much material is printed here on the horrific treatment of Union prisoners, Confederate strategy to subvert and sabotage the Union, and the links between the assassins and that strategy.

Monaghan 845. Sabin 41175. Not in Eberstadt or Nicholson.   (29416)       $450.00

 

38.   Brainerd, David: MIRABILIA DEI INTER INDICOS, OR THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF A REMARKABLE WORK OF GRACE AMONGST A NUMBER OF THE INDIANS IN THE PROVINCES OF NEW-JERSEY AND PENNSYLVANIA, JUSTLY REPRESENTED IN A JOURNAL KEPT BY ORDER OF THE HONOURABLE SOCIETY (IN SCOTLAND) FOR PROPAGATING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE. WITH SOME GENERAL REMARKS. BY DAVID BRAINERD, MINISTER OF THE GOSPEL, AND MISSIONARY FROM THE SAID SOCIETY. PUBLISHED BY THE REV. & WORTHY CORRESPONDENTS OF THE SAID SOCIETY. WITH A PREFACE BY THEM. Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by William Bradford, [1746]. viii, 232, 231-253, [1 blank] pp. Lacking the half title, else collated as issued. Lightly toned. Repairs without loss to pages 145 and 147. Bound in late 19th century speckled cloth and half morocco, with gilt-lettered spine title. Good+.

 

     "David Brainerd, a sickly child, achieved a traumatic religious conversion in 1739. Just three years later, he was expelled from Yale University for making derogatory remarks about a tutor; nonetheless, he was able to obtain a license to preach and ministered to Native Americans in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Due to his ill health, Brainerd died when he was only twenty-nine, but the present work gave him international fame as a missionary, influencing future missionaries to North America and elsewhere. He travelled from Stockbridge, Massachusetts to the forks of the Delaware River and present-day Freehold, New Jersey" [Siebert Sale]. A Presbyterian minister, Brainerd died at the home of Jonathan Edwards.

FIRST EDITION. Howes B717'b'. Siebert Sale 148. Evans 5748. Hildeburn 968. Vail 432. Felcone Collection 23.

   (29095)         $7,500.00

 

39.   Briggs, Richard: THE NEW ART OF COOKERY, ACCORDING TO THE PRESENT PRACTICE; BEING A COMPLETE GUIDE TO ALL HOUSEKEEPERS, ON A PLAN ENTIRELY NEW; CONSISTING OF THIRTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS... BY RICHARD BRIGGS, MANY YEARS COOK AT THE GLOBE TAVERN FLEET-STREET, THE WHITE HART TAVERN, HOLBORN, AND NOW AT THE TEMPLE COFFEE-HOUSE, LONDON. Philadelphia: Printed for W. Spotswood, R. Campbell, and B. Johnson, 1792. xii, xi-xvi, 557, [1- advert. for Spotswood's books] pp. Front free endpaper absent; light to moderate foxing; one gathering bound upside down; about five leaves trimmed too closely, occasionally affecting a word or letter. Bound in attractive contemporary calf, with gilt-lettered spine title on red morocco, gilt spine bands; and the bookplate of the noted Americanist Michael Zinman. Good+.

 

     This is the first American edition of one of the earliest cookbooks printed in America; it was reprinted in Philadelphia in 1798. It was originally published in London in 1788; Briggs's prefatory remarks are dated 1788 and addressed to his readers "in hopes that they will find the Directions and Receipts more intelligible than in most Books of the Kind." The chapters include material on wine and wine making, cordials, brewing, "proper rules to be observed in marketing," "rules for trussing," sauces, baking, broiling, and everything else.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. Evans 24145. Lowenstein [3d ed.] 8.   (29093)    $2,500.00

 

40.   [Bright, Jesse D.]: PROCEEDINGS, INCLUDING SPEECHES, OPINIONS AND VOTES IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES, BY WHICH THE RIGHT OF THE HON. JESSE D. BRIGHT AND THE HON. GRAHAM N. FITCH TO THEIR SEATS AS SENATORS U.S. FROM THE STATE OF INDIANA WAS CONFIRMED. Washington: Geo. S. Gideon, Printer, 1858. Original printed pink wrappers [some discoloration], stitched. vii, [1 blank], 132pp. A few pages with a bit of inner margin spotting. Very Good. Inscribed above the title, "J.G. Woodbury Per J.D. Bright."

 

     The question was whether the State of Indiana had legally returned Senators Bright and Fitch to the Senate. Bright and Fitch were Democrats, elected by Indiana's Democratic Senate; the Republican members of the State Senate failed to participate in the election. The next Legislature, which was predominantly Republican, declared this election illegal, and chose Henry S. Lane and William M. McCarty as Senators. They claimed their seats in Washington. The U.S. Senate rejected their claim on a Party vote, and voted to seat Bright and Fitch. The title page is preceded by a detailed Table of Contents, listing all the opinions, resolutions, testimony, votes, reports, and speeches. Much discussion occurs on the legal authority for the U.S. Senate to judge the qualifications of those who claim to have been duly elected.  

     Bright lived in southern Indiana; he owned a farm and slaves across the river in Kentucky. His interests-- both material and emotional-- were those of a southern plantation owner. During the War, Bright became the only person from a Northern State expelled from the Senate for his Confederate sympathies. Fitch was along for the ride--- he was elected to the U.S. Senate to fill a vacancy in the term beginning March 4, 1855, and served from February 4, 1857, to March 3, 1861. He commanded Union troops during the War.

Not in Sabin, Cohen, or Eberstadt. OCLC 24888369 [4].   (28924)  $275.00

 

41.   [Britton, E.H.]: THE FREE SCHOOL SYSTEM OF SOUTH CAROLINA. FROM THE SOUTHERN QUARTERLY REVIEW. Columbia, S.C.: Printed and Published by E.H. Britton, 1856. 40pp, disbound, trimmed closely but no text affected. Scattered foxing, ink bleeding on last leaf but text easily legible. Good+.

 

     A very scarce, enthusiastic examination of the history and development of South Carolina's free school system, a noble effort to rescue "thousands from the doom of hopeless ignorance, and the first step in the ascent of others to honours, usefulness, and fame. It has let down a rope into the sinks of poverty by which a few gifted minds have been drawn up into the clear light and bracing air of learning, refinement, and elegance."

Not in Turnbull or Sabin. OCLC 18152700 [1- Clemson] [as of December 2012].

   (29653)         $375.00

 

42.   Brooklyn City Guard: COLLECTION OF 37 ORDERS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS OF THE BROOKLYN CITY GUARD, AUGUST 31, 1843 - JUNE 20, 1848, MOST SIGNED IN TYPE AT BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, BY JAMES N. OLNEY, CAPTAIN. [Brooklyn?: 1843-1848]. Small broadsides, from 3.75" x 6" to 5.5" x 8.5", most printed on white paper, a few on blue. Occasional light scattered foxing, light toning, minor wear. Very Good.

 

     The Brooklyn City Guard was formed in August 1842, as a volunteer military company. A light artillery unit, it was celebrated by Brooklynites as a fashionable military outfit known for its drills, parades, and balls. Songs-- "The Brooklyn City Guard Quick Step" and "Olney's Quick Step"-- were composed in the Guard's honor. The Guard remained an independent organization until 1847, when it joined with the 13th New York Regiment. James N. Olney was the first Captain, a position he held for several years; he then moved to California during the Gold Rush, where he became a leader of the San Francisco Vigilance Committee; he would command the 2nd California Regiment in the Civil War. [Howard: THE EAGLE AND BROOKLYN... VOL. 2. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle: 1893. Page 837.]

     The Orders include matters such as drills and parades, upcoming inspections, adoption of regulations, funeral announcements, appointments of officers, and planned excursions.    (30045)         $600.00

 

43.   [Brownlow, William G.]: PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHY OF PARSON BROWNLOW, THE TENNESSEE PATRIOT. TOGETHER WITH HIS LAST EDITORIAL IN THE KNOXVILLE WHIG; ALSO, HIS RECENT SPEECHES, REHEARSING HIS EXPERIENCE WITH SECESSION, AND HIS PRISON LIFE. Indianapolis: Asher & Co., Publishers, 1862. Original printed brown wrappers [with a Cincinnati imprint, published by Mumford & Co., 1862]. Original stitching, but three inner margin stab holes. 72pp, full-page woodcut portrait of Brownlow. Very Good, with contemporary ownership signature of William Chaffee.

 

     Brownlow "had, he said, as strong a voice as any man in east Tennessee. When not in controversy he was a peaceful and charming man, but his fearless and ruthless honesty in expressing his opinions made him always a storm center...For ten years he served as an itinerant preacher, but his intense interest in public questions, and a natural gift of pungent speech soon led him into political as well as religious controversy." DAB " He was editor and publisher of the Knoxville Whig, the most influential paper in East Tennessee, with the largest circulation in the State.

     Brownlow's outspoken Unionism was only intensified by Tennessee's secession. Refusing allegiance to the Confederacy, he was quickly "indicted by the Grand Jury, and his paper suppressed" in October 1861. The book prints his last editorial in the Whig. Much of this book includes lurid tales of his prison treatment and the atrocities of the Confederates. Released to the North because of ill health, Brownlow gave pro-Union speeches in Cincinnati, Indianapolis, and Chicago, where he nevertheless distanced himself from the abolitionists. He later became Tennessee's governor and a U.S. Senator.

Sabin 8704. Not in Bartlett or Nevins. OCLC 23061040 [4- SUNY, Princeton, U TX, Chicago Hist. Mus.] [as of March 2013] [plenty of Kirtas Technology and other reprints].    (30024)    $450.00

 

44.   Buchan, William: DOMESTIC MEDICINE; OR, THE FAMILY PHYSICIAN: BEING AN ATTEMPT TO RENDER THE MEDICAL ART MORE GENERALLY USEFUL, BY SHEWING PEOPLE WHAT IS IN THEIR OWN POWER BOTH WITH RESPECT TO THE PREVENTION AND CURE OF DISEASES. CHIEFLY CALCULATED TO RECOMMEND A PROPER ATTENTION TO REGIMEN AND SIMPLE MEDICINES. THE THIRD AMERICAN EDITION, WITH CONSIDERABLE ADDITIONS, BY THE AUTHOR. Norwich: Printed by John Trumbull, for Robert Hodge..., 1778. [2], xiv, [4- Table of Contents and Index of Medicines], [17]-436 pp. Lightly tanned and foxed, last few leaves spotted. Bound in contemporary sheep, with raised spine bands; a firm binding. Good+. Inscription on front free endpaper: 'Zachariah Allen| his Book Bought| in the year| 1778| price 5 Dollers'.

 

     "Buchan first published Domestic medicine at Edinburgh in 1769. It had an enormous circulation, no fewer than nineteen editions being published during the author's lifetime, and it continued in print until the mid-nineteenth century. Buchan gives simple and easily followed advice in this book and deals at considerable length with various matters that may affect the health, such as diet, ventilation, sleep, cleanliness, and infection. The greater part of the treatise is taken up with a description of the causes, management, and treatment of diseases, such as fevers, pneumonia, smallpox, whooping cough, and colic. His remarks are of lasting value and give valuable insight into the relationship between social conditions and disease in the eighteenth century." Heirs of Hippocrates 991.

Evans 15751. Austin 311. Guerra a-621.

   (29094)         $1,000.00

 

45.   Burleigh, William H.: THE REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN SONGSTER, FOR 1860. EDITED BY WILLIAM H. BURLEIGH. New York: H. Dayton, Publisher, 1860. 72pp, stitched in original printed front wrapper. Last leaf repaired rather amateurishly, but without text loss; light wear. Ownership inscription at head of title. Good+.

 

     The inner front wrapper advertises Burleigh's Republican Pocket Pistol, a Republican campaign periodical. Burleigh's Preface acknowledges Song "as a legitimate political power, scarcely secondary in its influence to that of the Speech itself," with a "marked influence in our Presidential contests...It is not necessary that it should possess much literary merit." So long as it has some "rhythmic form" and "popular thought," it will do the trick.

     This Songster prints the words to such songs as "Lincoln and Liberty," "Freedom and Reform," "Up for the Conflict," etc., set to the tunes of different popular songs. Burleigh, George Bungay, and Horace Greeley number among the authors.

Not in Monaghan, Bartlett, Dumond, LCP, Eberstadt, Decker. Sabin 70023.

   (29295)         $850.00

 

46.   Burlington and Missouri River Railroad: TREMENDOUS CROPS!!! A SUCCESSFUL REGION!!! GLAD TIDINGS FOR THE FALL AND WINTER OF 1877 AND 1878. SOUTHERN IOWA AND SOUTH EASTERN NEBRASKA, AHEAD. THE OLD B. AND M. R.R. HAS THE LARGEST AND FINEST CROPS, THE MOST SUCCESSFUL SETTLERS. THE BEST & CHEAPEST LANDS. THE LONGEST CREDITS & LOWEST INTEREST. CHEAPEST FARES & FREIGHTS. SEE INSIDE. St. Louis : A. Gast & Co., Lith., [1877]. 31, [1] pp. Stitched in original printed yellow, attractive title wrappers [as issued]. Title in a variety of type styles and fonts. Light wrapper wear, with a short repaired closed margin tear [no loss] and small blank corner chip. Three maps [verso of front wrapper, recto and verso of rear wrapper]. Two full-page engraved illustrations ['Looking southwest from Lincoln, Neb.'; and 'Valley of the Big Blue, south of Seward, Neb.'], each signed 'Russell & Richardson.' Very Good. Laid in is a four-page 'Circular of Rates on Tickets and Freights.'

 

     A rare, detailed promotional from this line, with several pages devoted to stock raising. The maps show the Great South Platte Region, with the Road's lands for sale; The Great Central Region, with routes and land grants; and the Route through Southern Iowa of the Main Line across the Continent, with lands for sale. Land prices, land agents, natural resources, soil, climate, homesteading, markets, "opportunities for capitalists," and settlers comprising "the best class of people from Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and the other Middle and Eastern States." An enthusiastic call for homesteaders.

Not located in Graff, Eberstadt, Decker, Soliday, Adams Herd. OCLC 6011024 [2- Harvard, AAS] [as of October 2012].

   (29526)         $750.00

 

47.   [Burn, Richard; and Joseph Greenleaf]: AN ABRIDGMENT OF BURN'S JUSTICE OF THE PEACE AND PARISH OFFICER. TO WHICH IS ADDED, AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING SOME GENERAL RULES AND DIRECTIONS NECESSARY TO BE KNOWN AND OBSERVED BY ALL JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. Boston: Printed for, and sold by Joseph Greenleaf, at his printing-office..., 1773. Original quarter sheep and paper over boards [sturdy but quite rubbed, with a couple of chips at the spine]. [8], 386, [2] pp. A contemporary manuscript index is added on the front free endpaper. Bookplate of the noted Americanist Michael Zinman. Mildly foxed, lightly toned, Very Good.

 

     The first edition of the first abridgement of a legal treatise printed in America, and the only such abridgement published before Independence. Greenleaf explains his adaptation of the work to American conditions: "The London edition takes in the whole practice of England and Scotland, this renders it both bulky and dear. The circle of a justices business in those places is vastly extensive, and is founded chiefly on acts of the British parliament, which can never have any relation to this colony." The appendix includes "general rules and directions" and forms for American courts.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 12702. Cohen 8325. I Harv. Law Cat. 277. Not in Sabin, Marvin, Marke, Eberstadt, Decker.

   (29819)         $2,500.00

 

48.   [Burns, Anthony]: BOSTON SLAVE RIOT, AND TRIAL OF ANTHONY BURNS, CONTAINING THE REPORT OF THE FANEUIL HALL MEETING; THE MURDER OF BACHELDER; THEODORE PARKER'S LESSON FOR THE DAY; SPEECHES OF COUNSEL ON BOTH SIDES, CORRECTED BY THEMSELVES; VERBATIM REPORT OF JUDGE LORING'S DECISION; AND, A DETAILED ACCOUNT OF THE EMBARKATION. Boston: Fetridge and Company, 1854. Original printed front wrapper with portrait of Burns [blank extremities of the wrapper are chipped]. Stitched, untrimmed, uncut, and generously margined. Pages 86, [12 publ. ads.]. Very Good.

 

     "The trial and rendition of Anthony Burns was one of the most dramatic and famous incidents in the enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Act of Sept. 18, 1850" [Finkelman]. In a proceeding before Commissioner Loring of Massachusetts, lacking the procedural safeguards that we take for granted today, Burns was declared the slave of his pursuer, one Suttle, and placed aboard a U.S. revenue cutter for return to Virginia. Several leading citizens (including Theodore Parker) tried unsuccessfully to rescue him, and Loring was impeached and removed from office.

     This pamphlet "contains valuable primary source material about the trial and the events surrounding it. Indeed, the juxtaposition of all the material in this volume indicates the important connection between events in the courtroom and those in the streets" [Id.]. Some copies of this pamphlet have the publisher ads, like this one, and others do not.

FIRST EDITION. Finkelman 112-113. LCP 1392. BEAL 11909.   (30014)            $500.00

 

49.   [Butler, Benjamin Franklin]: REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ADMISSION OF CADETS INTO THE MILITARY ACADEMY. [Washington: February 15, 1837]. Broadside, 8" x 10". Text of the broadside printed in typescript. A few short fold splits in the margin, no loss. Else Very Good. Signed by Secretary of War Butler in type and dated at the end.

 

     The regulations announce "the mode of procuring admission into the Military Academy."  "Each candidate must not be under sixteen nor over twenty-one years of age." He must be at least 4' 9" tall [yes, that's correct], and "free from any deformity, disease, or infirmity, which would render him unfit for the Military service, and from any disorder of an infectious or immoral character. He must be able to read and write well." Also, to perform "with facility and accuracy" the "grand rules of Arithmetic-- of Reduction, of Simple and Compound Proportion, and Vulgar and Decimal Fractions."

Not located on OCLC.   (29561)        $250.00

 

50.   Callender, James Thomson: THE POLITICAL PROGRESS OF BRITAIN: OR, AN IMPARTIAL HISTORY OF ABUSES IN THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE, IN EUROPE, ASIA, AND AMERICA. FROM THE REVOLUTION, IN 1688, TO THE PRESENT TIME: THE WHOLE TENDING TO PROVE THE RUINOUS CONSEQUENCES OF THE POPULAR SYSTEM OF TAXATION, WAR, AND CONQUEST. "THE WORLD'S MAD BUSINESS." PART FIRST. THIRD EDITION. Philadelphia: Richard Folwell, 1795. 120pp, contemporary plain wrappers [moderately worn], stitched, partly untrimmed. Light wear, Very Good.

 

     "The first edition was issued in Edinburgh in 1792. 'Part First' is deceptive. This issue is complete to 1792, but re-written and expanded in some ways, rather than a reprint of the 1792 text. This is the second American edition" [Evans]. Despite Callender's efforts to portray this work as an "impartial" history, it led to his indictment in 1792. "To escape trial for sedition, Callender fled to the United States" [McCoy C22]. Jefferson and his allies regarded him "as a man of genius suffering under persecution." Certainly he had a "genius as a scandal-monger" and Jefferson secretly made full use of it, employing him to attack Hamilton and other rivals. Later Callender, like a pet snake, turned on Jefferson, accusing him of "dishonesty, cowardice, and gross personal immorality" [DAB entry on Callender].

Evans 28379. Gaines 94-27 [Phila. 1794]. Sabin 10066.   (29814)    $650.00

 

51.   [Cameron, Simon]: FROM DOCUMENT NO. 229, OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 3D SESSION 25TH CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES CONTAINING ALLEGATIONS OF FRAUD "IN RELATION TO THE SETTLEMENT OF THE CLAIMS OF THE HALF-BREED RELATIVES OF THE WINNEBAGOE INDIANS," IN WHICH CASE THE COMMISSION OF GENERAL SIMON CAMERON WAS SET ASIDE. [Caption-title: TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA... EXECUTION OF TREATY WITH THE WINNEBAGOES.]. [Harrisburg?: 1855?]. 48pp. Stitched in original printed blue title wrappers [spine-chipped]. Two stab holes in blank left margin. Light scattered foxing, old vertical fold, Very Good.

 

     The document, says Howes, was reprinted "to discredit" Cameron, a Pennsylvania kingmaking politician who avidly stuffed his pockets with the spoils of a panoply of public offices. In 1838 President Van Buren made him an Indian Commissioner in charge of settling the Winnebago Indian land claims. The appointment ended in scandal when he used his own bank's notes as part of the adjustment. He became derisively known as "The Great Winnebago Chief." The front wrapper, quoting from the St. Louis Reporter, calls Cameron's activities "infamous speculation."

     Bibliographers-- generally recording only a 38-page pamphlet under this title-- conclude that this pamphlet was printed in 1839. That seems unlikely. Original House Document 229 was printed during the 25th Congress in 1839. This reprint, intended to thwart Cameron's designs on a U.S. Senate seat, was probably printed in 1855: he was running for the Senate that year and a related pamphlet, entitled a Rejoinder to the Defence Published by Simon Cameron, also issued in 1855. Each of them exposes Cameron's shady business dealings during his term as Indian Commissioner. "Plot of Simon Cameron and fellow rascals to defraud these Indians of half a million dollars, frustrated by a young army officer, E.A. Hitchcock" [Howes].

OCLC 38259958 [1-PA State U.] [48pp] [as of November 2012]. Field 1686 and Howes W569 [38pp].

   (29528)         $275.00

 

52.   [Cameron, Simon]: REJOINDER TO THE DEFENCE PUBLISHED BY SIMON CAMERON, FEBRUARY 6TH, 1855, TO THE CHARGES MADE AGAINST HIM AS COMMISSIONER TO CARRY INTO EFFECT THE TREATY WITH THE HALF-BREED WINNEBAGO INDIANS; ALSO, PUBLIC DOCUMENT, NO. 229, OF HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF U.S., 25TH CONGRESS, - 3D SESSION. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. [Harrisburg?: 1855]. xvi, 72pp. Original printed wrappers [light spotting and wear], stitched, two stab holes in left corner. Light scattered foxing, else clean. Very Good.

    

     In 1838 Cameron, a Pennsylvania kingmaking politician who avidly stuffed his pockets with the spoils from a panoply of public offices, was appointed, by the grace of President Van Buren, an Indian Commissioner in charge of settling the Winnebago Indian land claims. The appointment ended in scandal when he used his own bank's notes as part of the adjustment. He became derisively known as "The Great Winnebago Chief."

     The pamphlet "Relates to the scandal involved in payment of claims of $100,000 to the Winnebago Indians residing in Prairie du Chien. Contains all the documents, letters, reports and other details of this flagrant case wherein the Indians were defrauded by the whites" [Eberstadt]. The pamphlet recounts this "bad man's audacity" in attempting to justify his obvious crimes, and prints Document 229, which exposed Cameron's fraud. The final section is introduced with a small note from John Weidman which states, "To prevent improper inferences, I here add the lame defence which Cameron has issued." This "defence" includes Cameron's personal letter to the People of Pennsylvania dated February 6, 1855 and accompanying letters and articles.

134 Eberstadt 665. OCLC notes 15 locations under two accession numbers [as of November 2012].

   (29529)         $250.00

 

53.   Carey, M[athew]: REFLECTIONS ON THE PRESENT SYSTEM OF BANKING, IN THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA. WITH A PLAN TO REVIVE CONFIDENCE, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, AND TO FACILITATE THE RESUMPTION OF SPECIE PAYMENTS. BY M. CAREY. Philadelphia: Published by the Author, Jan. 30, 1817. 30pp. Disbound, title and last leaf moderately foxed. Contemporary ink number '5' touches a few letters in the title. Good to Good+.

 

     Several printings issued in this year-- American Imprints lists this January 30, 1817, printing with 28 pages, suggesting some bibliographical confusion.

     Bemoaning "the morbid state of manufactures, trade, commerce, and industry," Carey criticizes the Banks, which could, in his view, "in one week restore credit and confidence-- rescue numbers from impending ruin." Carey's pamphlet-- addressed to the mass of the American people who, in their hearts, are "a nation of politicians" with little knowledge of Banking-- denounces Banks for their "single eye directed to large dividends" instead of acting in the public interest; for their "immoderate and abrupt loans," their "abrupt and precipitate curtailments of discounts" followed by "immoderate extensions;" and for a variety of other mismanagements which he describes in detail.  

111 Eberstadt 504. Kress B6885 [another edition]. AI 40400 [2], 40401 [1].

   (29446)         $250.00

 

54.   Carter, A.G.: TO THE FREE-HOLDERS OF ROWAN & DAVIE COUNTIES. [Salisbury, N.C.: June 22, 1844]. Broadside, 7 3/4" x 12 1/2". Several light edge chips, light toning. Very Good.

 

     A rare campaign broadside. Carter had been State Senator from Rowan and Davie Counties for the previous twelve years, and seeks another term in office. "It is my pride and pleasure to be numbered with the great farming interest of the country." Although the State Legislature "has at any time little to do with National politics," he announces his support for the annexation of Texas, "if we can now re-acquire this valuable possession by Treaty in an honorable way and on right terms...Texas is a large and fertile region adjoining the State of Louisiana, settled almost entirely by citizens from the United States;- it was purchased from France in 1803, and improperly sold to Spain in 1820 by the Treaty of Florida."

     Additionally, he opposes Congress's Distribution Law, an obscure issue today, but a hot one in the first half of the 19th century, when many Americans believed that proceeds from the sale of the public lands were used, not "to prevent a direct Tax upon the people," but to fill the coffers of "certain favored States." 

Thornton 1892. AI 44-1231 [1- NcU]. OCLC 5578535 [3- U VA, State Lib. NC, Wake Forest] [as of December 2012]. Not in Streeter.

   (29695)         $500.00

 

55.   [Cartwright, John]: AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE THE INTEREST AND GLORY OF GREAT BRITAIN; CONTAINING ARGUMENTS WHICH PROVE, THAT NOT ONLY IN TAXATION, BUT IN TRADE, MANUFACTURES, AND GOVERNMENT, THE COLONIES ARE ENTITLED TO AN ENTIRE INDEPENDENCY ON THE BRITISH LEGISLATURE; AND THAT IT CAN ONLY BE BY A FORMAL DECLARATION OF THESE RIGHTS, AND FORMING THEREUPON A FRIENDLY LEAGUE WITH THEM, THAT THE TRUE AND LASTING WELFARE OF BOTH COUNTRIES CAN BE PROMOTED. IN A SERIES OF LETTERS TO THE LEGISLATURE. Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by Robert Bell, 1776. xxiii, [1], [25]-125, [1 blank], [1], [1 blank] pp. Lacking the half title, disbound and lightly foxed,

else Very Good.

 

     This is the first American edition of a celebrated pamphlet, in the form of ten Letters dated in March and April 1774. The earlier London printings must have been bought up quickly, because page [121] prints Robert Bell's appeal-- printed originally in the Monthly Review-- for someone to lend him a copy "for a few days only," and thus "render an essential service to the cause of LIBERTY and LITERATURE in AMERICA."

     The pamphlet includes, says the author, "copious Notes; containing Reflections on the Boston and Quebec Acts; and a full Justification of the People of Boston, for destroying the British-taxed Tea." He denies that Parliament "hath the right of sovereignty over North America," or that It "hath a right to tax the North Americans." Cartwright insists, with Locke, upon "the right of a free subject not to be taxed without his consent, either in person or by representation."  With dramatic moral authority he writes, "Let Englishmen, who have been admired for ages, for their regard to liberty, blush, when it is now said, that, by superior force, they would deprive three or four millions of their fellow-subjects of those rights and privileges to which they are so attached themselves. How depraved a mind would that individual be said to possess...[T]hey invade the most precious rights a human being can enjoy, and would render the rest of mankind miserable servile wretches."

     The book advocates separate, independent government for the American colonies, in a confederation with England. Its publication "led to a rupture of the friendly relations with Lord Howe, and completed the estrangement that had begun with his refusal to accept a commission in the army to war against the Americans.î [Appleton's.]  "The authorís biographer says, 'at a time when no Member of Parliament had sufficient decision of mind to propose the Independence of America, Major Cartwright suggested the expediency of an Union between Great Britain and her Colonies under separate Legislatures.'" Sabin 11152.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. Howes C206 'aa.' Evans 14673. Hildeburn 3344. Adams, American Independence 105c. Sabin 11153.

   (29103)         $7,500.00

 

56.   [Cass, Lewis]: DISCRIMINATIONS IN SWITZERLAND AGAINST CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES OF THE HEBREW PERSUASION. MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, TRANSMITTING...INFORMATION RELATIVE TO DISCRIMINATIONS IN SWITZERLAND AGAINST CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES OF THE HEBREW PERSUASION. [Washington: 1860]. 101, [1 blank] pp. 36th Cong., 1st Sess. HED 76. Disbound, rubberstamped fore-edge, else Fine.

 

     Lewis Cass, President Buchanan's Secretary of State, transmits documentation of  the anti-Semitism of Swiss authorities. One Gootmann, an American citizen, was ordered "to quit the country, on the ground of his being an Israelite merchant." Much material on this deplorable incident, as well as other similar incidents, is printed here; with efforts by American authorities to change Swiss behavior. The Report also reviews the litany of Swiss laws which stamp Jews with second-class citizenship and a variety of prohibitions which do not burden other ethnic groups.

Singerman 1691.   (29494)      $375.00

 

57.   Central Military Tract Railroad Company: REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS OF THE CENTRAL MILITARY TRACT RAILROAD COMPANY, TO THE STOCKHOLDERS. JUNE, 1856. Chicago: Scripps, Bross & Spears, Book and Job Printers , 1856. 26pp. Disbound without wrappers, else Very Good.

 

    This early, rare Chicago pre-fire imprint is a summary of "the first year's business of the road of this Company," which consolidated with the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RR in 1857. The Road, though only 79 miles long, was strategically located, "extending from Mendota, where the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy road terminates, to Galesburg, where the Northern Cross Road, extending to Quincy, commences, and where it also intersects the Peoria and Oquawka Railroad...It forms, therefore, the trunk road over which a very large business will find its way to and from Chicago, which is destined to be the great commercial and business city of the Northwest."

     The growing business of the Road is described, with numerous Tables and optimistic predictions for its future. Also printed are Agreements with other Railroads for the enhancement of its business opportunities.   

Ante-Fire Imprints 169. Sabin 11686. OCLC 244153391 [1- AAS] [as of November 2012]

   (29537)         $650.00

 

58.   Central Southern Rights Association: ADDRESS OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED BY THE FRIENDS OF SOUTHERN RIGHTS TO THE PEOPLE OF MISSISSIPPI, DECEMBER 10TH, 1850. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE CENTRAL SOUTHERN RIGHTS ASSOCIATION. Jackson: Fall and Marshall, Printers., 1850. 13, [3 blanks] pp. Folded, untrimmed, uncut. Title leaf foxed, else Very Good.

 

     A bitter, rare denunciation of the Compromise of 1850, and a passionate threat to dissolve the Union. The "series of measures" leading to admission of California as a Free State constitute "usurpation and revolution." The federal government is virtually controlled now by "free-soilism," which thus "makes an immense stride towards accomplishing the avowed object of its advocates, in surrounding us with a cordon of free States."

     Recounting Northern abuses-- especially agitation by meddlers "who have no pecuniary or social interest in the subject of slavery"-- the Address remarks, "Without the constitution, and without the Union, the acts of the Northern people would be cause of war." Clinging still to the Union, the Address concludes that, "true to its instincts of freedom, the South gave up the Union only when it no longer secured the blessings of a rational liberty." The Address is signed in type by A.M. Clayton, J.I. Guion, Roger Barton, J.A. Quitman, and five others, "On behalf of the Committee." It is dated from Jackson, December 10, 1850.

OCLC 476426760 [1- NYPL] [as of October 2012]. Not in Owen, Sabin, LCP, Blockson, Eberstadt.

    (29432)        $1,750.00

 

59.   Charleston Baptist Association: MINUTES OF THE CHARLESTON BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, AT ITS ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY, HELD WITH THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, CHARLESTON, S.C. NOVEMBER 1, 2, 3, 4, 1851, TOGETHER WITH THE CENTENNIAL SERMON, BY THE REV. JAMES C. FURMAN. Charleston: A.J. Burke, 1851. 70, [2 blanks] pp. Stitched, scattered foxing, Good+.

 

     Reverend Furman founded Furman University and was its first president. This pamphlet provides data on the Baptist Church in South Carolina, its constituent churches, leaders, members, and participants in the Proceedings. Reports on missions to the Indians, other missions, temperance activities, and detailed tables of data are included. The 1850 Constitution of the Association is printed, with Rules. Reverend Furman's Historical Discourse on the history and development of the Charleston Baptist Association is printed with a separate title page but continuous pagination.

III Turnbull 129.   (29650)      $275.00

 

60.   Cheever, George B.: CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. THE ARGUMENT OF REV. GEORGE B. CHEEVER, IN REPLY TO J.L. O'SULLIVAN, ESQ., IN THE BROADWAY TABERNACLE, ON THE EVENINGS OF JANUARY 27TH, AND FEBRUARY 3D & 17TH. New York: Published by Saxton & Miles...Boston: Saxton, Pierce & Co., 1843. Original printed wrappers [lightly foxed], stitched. 108pp. Front free endpaper foxed, else light occasional foxing, minor wear. Very Good.

 

     Reverend Cheever, opposing O'Sullivan's arguments, justifies capital punishment as an ordinance promulgated by God to correct the consequences of "the divine lenity in the case of Cain." When given the "assurance that his own life would not be taken," men are more likely to commit murder. Indeed, "the crime of murder had become frightfully common, the earth being filled with violence." The "Divine Legislator" thus made "a covenant with Noah and his posterity" to correct this evil by imposition of capital punishment.

Cohen 3800. AI 43-1030 [5].    (30031)         $250.00

 

61.   Cheves, Langdon: SPEECH OF THE HON. LANGDON CHEVES, DELIVERED BEFORE THE DELEGATES OF THE NASHVILLE CONVENTION, ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1850. PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. Columbia, S.C.: From the Steam-Power Press of I.C. Morgan, State Printer., 1850. 19, [1 blank] pp. Disbound. Outer margin trimmed closely to text, just shaving portions of a letter from time to time. Good+.

 

     "On June 3 the delegates of nine southern states met in convention at Nashville. Here was the end product of years of effort on the part of militant southerners to secure a united South. During the preceding winter, when southerners felt the duress of the Wilmot Proviso about to be imposed, they had looked to this meeting of the southern states as the beginning of a new era for the South...For the first time, the southern states, by standing together, would compel a recognition of their rights within the Union or would move by concerted action to go out of it." Potter, Impending Crisis 104.

     Cheves describes the "melancholy occasion" of the Convention: the necessity "of defending the Southern States against a great and alarming danger, with which we are not threatened by a foreign foe or a common enemy, but by our fellow-citizens," who wish to tear down Slavery and the Southern Way of Life. He provides a litany of Northern outrages against the South, and warns of the decline of Southern power within the Union. 

Howes, LCP, and Turnbull record Cheves's November 14 speech at the Convention but not this one. OCLC lists six locations, as of December 2012.

   (29649)         $450.00

 

62.   Chicago and Rock Island Rail Road Company: BY-LAWS OF THE CHICAGO AND ROCK ISLAND RAIL ROAD COMPANY, ADOPTED JUNE 9TH, 1858. New York: Benjamin Corlies, 1858. Original printed glossy wrappers [light fading to lettering]. Stitched. 10, [2 blanks] pp. Near Fine.

 

     Founded in 1847 as the Rock Island and LaSalle Rail Road Company, the Chicago and Rock Island reincorporated in 1851 and adopted these bylaws in 1858. In 1880, the Company was reorganized as the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway.

131 Eberstadt 354.    (30039) $250.00

 

63.   [Civil Rights]: THE SHORTER CATECHISM OF NEGRO EQUALITY. [np: 1855-1864?]. Broadside, 3 1/2" x 6 1/4". Several light purple spots, Good or Good+.

 

     A small, scarce, ephemeral Republican Party broadside charging that Democrats, despite charges that Republicans are the party "of negro equality," have themselves been the chief supporters of measures to enfranchise Negroes. "Who gave the negroes the right of suffrage in New York? The Democratic Party...Who married a negro woman, and by her had mulatto children?- Richard M. Johnson, a good Democrat" and Martin Van Buren's Vice President. "Who, with the above facts and many others staring them in the face, are continually whinnig [sic] about 'negro suffrage' and negro equality? The Democratic Party. All these things were done by Democrats, and yet they deny being in favor of negro equality, and charge it upon the Republicans-- just like the thief who cries 'stop thief' the loudest."

     The suggested date derives from the broadside's reference to Reuben Wood, a former Governor of Ohio and Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court, who "is still a leader of the Democratic Party." Wood died in 1864. During Wood's judicial tenure, he decided to make "mulattoes legal voters in Ohio."

OCLC records only a few copies, of various sizes and slight variations in wording, none as small as this one. LCP 9401-2 [other printings].   (30018)      $275.00

 

64.   [Clinton, De Witt]: (CIRCULAR.) NEW YORK. [Nov. 10] 18[19]. TO [Joseph W. Moulton, Esquire] SIR, AS MEMBERS OF THE GREAT REPUBLICAN FAMILY TO WHICH YOU BELONG, WE TAKE THE LIBERTY OF PRESENTING YOU WITH OUR VIEWS, IN RELATION TO THE NEW-YORK-STATE GOVERNMENT, AND THE OPPOSITION ARRAYED AGAINST IT AT THE PRESENT MOMENT... [New York: 1819]. Folio sheet folded to 7 3/4" x 12 1/2", with caption title [as issued]. [3], [1 blank] pp. Items in parentheses are in manuscript; the rest is in print. Several fold splits and expert repairs [no text loss]. Good+. The addressee, at the head of the title and on blank page [4] is Joseph W. Moulton of Buffalo, with Albany postal cancel.

 

     Robert Bogardus and nine other members of the "Correspondence Committee for the City & County of N. York" sign this circular in type at the end of page [3]. They urge the re-election of De Witt Clinton as Governor, citing his accomplishments: establishment of the Board of Agriculture, the Great Western Canal, and the Northern Canal; a laudable economy in government; development of "our learned institutions"; and other achievements. "Under the present Administration, the great state of New-York has been elevated and ennobled in the eyes of the union and of the civilized world."

     This rare item is evidently located only at the New York Historical Society.

Not in Sabin or American Imprints. OCLC 79437950 [1] [as of 5/12].   (28880)     $500.00

 

65.   Cobbett, William: A LITTLE PLAIN ENGLISH, ADDRESSED TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES, ON THE TREATY, NEGOCIATED WITH HIS BRITANNIC MAJESTY, AND ON THE CONDUCT OF THE PRESIDENT RELATIVE THERETO; IN ANSWER TO "THE LETTERS OF FRANKLIN." WITH A SUPPLEMENT CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE TURBULENT AND FACTIOUS PROCEEDINGS OF THE OPPOSERS OF THE TREATY. BY PETER PORCUPINE. Philadelphia: Published by Thomas Bradford, Printer, bookseller, and Stationer, 1795. 8, 111, [1 blank] pp [as issued]. With the half title, which is cut at the blank bottom half. Disbound with some loosening, Good+.

 

     This is Cobbett's slashing attack on opponents of the Treaty with England-- particularly Alexander Dallas, the 'Franklin' upon whom Cobbett lavishes most of his attention. "The Letters of Franklin were a series of articles in the Philadelphia Aurora...The author's violent opposition to a British Treaty was enough to make Cobbett undertake the task of replying to him" [Pearl]. Gaines identifies three states of the first edition; he records this one as Gaines 7c, because the last word on page 89 is 'that.'

     'Franklin' is a demagogue, a "fawning mob orator." Cobbett defends President Washington and the Treaty, blasts French Minister Genet, and asserts the "absurdity of a government's being founded upon the presumption that the people are capable of governing themselves."

FIRST EDITION. Howes C521. Evans 28437. Gaines 7c. Pearl 8.

   (29864)         $250.00

 

66.   [Cobbett, William]: PORCUPINE'S POLITICAL CENSOR, FOR SEPT. 1796. CONTAINING, THE LIFE OF TOM PAINE, INTERSPERSED WITH REMARKS AND REFLECTIONS... Philadelphia: Published by William Cobbett, [1796]. [2], [251]-327, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, light foxing. Very Good.

 

     "It is not clear whether this edition was ever issued separately." NAIP. It was, like several other of Porcupine's Censors, also issued as part of Cobbett's 'Porcupine's Works.' This printing is a variant of William Cobbett 20c: in this copy the term '[Sept.]' does not appear opposite signature B.

     The Censor inveighs against Thomas Paine, whose devotees "are professed admirers of all that is of low and even base extraction." Paine's private life as a womanizer and adulterer is held up to scorn; and his public life fares no better. Motivated only by self-interest, he would "have stigmatized the Americans as rebels and traitors" had England satisfied his financial needs. Paine was a "traitor," pure and simple.

Gaines, William Cobbett 20c. Not in Evans or Gaines, Concealed Authorship. NAIP w027763.

   (29156)         $250.00

 

67.   Continental Congress: RESOLUTIONS, ACTS AND ORDERS OF CONGRESS, FOR THE YEAR 1780. VOLUME VI. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF CONGRESS. [Philadelphia]: Printed by John Dunlap, [1786]. 257, [1 blank] pp. In later calf, with gilt-lettered morocco spine title. Light toning and foxing, short closed tear to blank portion of title leaf [expertly repaired], lacking the Index at the end, else Very Good.

 

     "An abridgement of the Journals of Congress for 1780, printed under a resolution of Congress of September 13, 1786." Evans. The Journals were printed, by order of Congress, in thirteen volumes during the years 1777-1788. This is Volume VI, which records Congress's resolution "that General Charles Lee be informed, that Congress have no further occasion for his services in the army of the United States"; and considered a variety of other important matters relating to the Revolution, including the trial of Andre, the Treaty with France [which is printed in full], privateers, prisoners of War, State quotas for troops and supplies, taxation, and much else.

Evans 20079.   (28910)           $2,000.00

 

68.   Cook, William A.: OPINIONS AND PRACTICE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THE REPUBLIC, IN RELATION TO ARBITRARY ARRESTS, IMPRISONMENT OF TORIES, WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS, SEIZURE OF ARMS AND OF PRIVATE PAPERS, DOMICILIARY VISITS, CONFISCATION OF REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE, ETC., ETC. OR, THE ADMINISTRATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN SUSTAINED BY THE SAGES AND HEROES OF THE REVOLUTION. Washington, D.C.: William H. Moore, Printer, 1864. 54pp, stitched. Title page lightly foxed. Else Very Good.

 

     A scarce pamphlet rebutting the relentless attacks on Lincoln for his curtailment of civil liberties during the War. Cook argues that Lincoln's actions have ample precedent in the opinions and practices of the Founding Fathers during and as a result of the American Revolution. Cook's prefatory Address to the Reader assures that the pamphlet "is not a mass of wild declamation. It leads you in a plain and easy way among the fathers of the Republic. It places you in their council chambers. It shows you what they considered should be done in the hour of national conflict and struggle!" Lincoln is following their example.

     "Only God and, perhaps, Mr. Monoghan can explain why the item was left out of his bibliography." 33 Wessen Catalogue 110.

Sabin 16299. Not in Bartlett, LCP, Nevins, Monaghan. OCLC: 35674108 [1- Lincoln Museum] [as of March 2013, with many facsimiles courtesy of Kirtas Technologies].

   (30019)         $450.00

 

69.   [Cooke, John Rogers]: AN EARNEST APPEAL TO THE FRIENDS OF REFORM IN THE LEGISLATURE OF VIRGINIA. [Winchester: Samuel H. Davis, 1828]. 16pp. Disbound, foxed, else Good+.

 

     American Imprints says this rare pamphlet, an early argument for the principle of "one man, one vote," was printed in Winchester, by Samuel H. Davis. Cooke, identifying himself only as "An Uncompromising Friend of Reform," writes in response to "the existing crisis in the affairs of the commonwealth." That crisis is the unjust apportionment of delegates to the upcoming Virginia Constitutional Convention: the first "omen of evil" was the decision for the Convention to be "composed of a member from each congressional district." That decision simply perpetuates the unfair dominance of the tidewater aristocracy at the Convention. Cooke notes the enormous disparities in population of the various congressional districts, to the advantage of the great slaveholding plantation owners. Second, those slaveholders insist, in order to protect their slave property from the mass of non-slaveholders, that they be accorded, "not only their individual vote, but three votes more for every five slaves that they possess."

     Cooke asserts the "very plain and obvious" proposition "why a man should have ONE vote: he is an intelligent free agent, with one mind, and one will. But it is very difficult to understand why one man should have MORE than one vote, or more votes than another man." Such a rule would abandon "the natural ancient and well-established principle of equality. He asks, rhetorically, "By what process of reasoning have you ascertained the precise degree of political power which you must hold, in order to be secure in the possession of [slave] property?"   

AI 32824 [1- photocopy]. OCLC 26625098 [2- Duke, VA Hist. Soc.] [as of October 2012]. Not in Sabin, Haynes, Swem, Cohen.

   (29460)         $1,000.00

 

70.   [Cooper, Thomas]: AN ACCOUNT OF THE TRIAL OF THOMAS COOPER, OF NORTHUMBERLAND; ON A CHARGE OF LIBEL AGAINST THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES; TAKEN IN SHORT HAND. WITH A PREFACE, NOTES, AND APPENDIX. Philadelphia: Printed by John Bioren...for the Author, April, 1800. 64pp, bound in recent cloth with gilt-lettered front cover. Untrimmed, scattered foxing. Blank outer margin of first leaf expertly reinforced. Good+.

 

     After emigrating from England Cooper settled in Pennsylvania near his friend Joseph Priestly. He was "an articulate anti-Federalist and wrote various articles against the Alien and Sedition Acts. In 1800 he was arrested and brought to trial in the Circuit Court of the United States under the Sedition Act of 1798 for libeling President Adams. Cooper conducted his own defense, arguing with great conviction and logic that his writings were both true and made with honest intent; that the denial of peaceful persuasion during a presidential campaign was to defeat democracy." McCoy. By any reasonable standard, Cooper's remarks were a normal part of political discourse: he criticized the sedition laws and Adams's foreign policy, and accused Adams of having released private correspondence which placed him, Cooper, in an unfavorable light.

     Samuel Chase, who had been appointed by President Washington to the U.S. Supreme Court, presided. Later to be impeached by the Jeffersonians, Chase demonstrated undisguised hostility to Cooper, who was convicted and sentenced to six months' imprisonment, "where he continued to criticize the President and the Federalists, assuming the role of political martyr." Id. Cooper later became President of South Carolina College.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 37249. Cohen 13315. McCoy C554. II Harv. Law Cat. 1051.

   (29080)         $1,500.00

 

71.   Cooper, Thomas: CONSOLIDATION. AN ACOUNT OF PARTIES IN THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE CONVENTION OF 1787, TO THE PRESENT PERIOD. [offered with] CONSOLIDATION, PART SECOND; OR AN ACCOUNT OF PARTIES IN THE UNITED STATES. BEING STRICTURES ON AN ARTICLE IN THE NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW, FOR JULY 1834. BY THOMAS COOPER, M.D. Columbia, SC: 1830, 1834. 37, [3 blank] pp, errata slip pasted to final blank. Stitched into modern marbled wrappers, Very Good. Part Second: 45, [3 blanks] pp. Disbound, one gathering browned, Good+. 

 

     Though the first part is styled 'Second Edition,' it has been significantly enlarged from the 1824 first printing [which lacks Cooper's statement, printed here, of the 'South Carolina Doctrines']. This is the first separate printing of the Second Part, which originally appeared in the Southern Times of Columbia in August-September 1834.

     Among the most articulate of the State Rights/ Free Trade theoreticians, Cooper was an English radical who moved to the United States in 1794. After tilting against the Alien and Sedition Acts, he became President of South Carolina College. The pamphlets are "the statement of an Anti-Federalist," opposing "the manifest encroachments of the general government." Cooper argues that the United States has become "a government, wherein the constitution is construed as the majority chooses to construe it; wherein general welfare is any thing that a majority chooses to call so; and wherein the minority are openly declared to have no rights whatever but what the majority think it prudent to dole out to them." Against this heresy, and in opposition to the Doctrine of Consolidation, he presents the 'South Carolina Doctrines,' emphasizing State Rights and a national government whose powers are strictly and narrowly circumscribed. The Second Part expands on this theme with six Essays, including Cooper's defense of South Carolina in the Nullification Controversy of the early 1830's, arguing that a State has a constitutional duty to annul "a void, or usurped authority." 

Howes T757. II Turnbull 208, 320. Cohen 6235, 6234.   (29869)     $850.00

 

72.   Crescent City Jockey Club: SOUVENIR... OFFICIAL PROGRAMME CRESCENT CITY JOCKEY CLUB. WINTER MEETING. 63RD DAY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1898. [New Orleans: 1898]. Broadside printed on bright yellow silk. Light old folds, minor edge wear, Very Good.

 

     An extremely attractive broadside for the Crescent City Jockey Club, which supervised races at the New Orleans Fair Grounds until 1908. This Programme lists six races; it prints, for each horse, its name, its rider's colors, its pedigree, its price, and its owner. Also printed are "Musical Selections by Prof. Wolff's Crescent City Orchestra: Second Ladies' Day Tuesday, February 15, 1898."

   (29785)         $750.00

 

73.   Crisp, Stephen: SERMONS OR DECLARATIONS, MADE BY STEPHEN CRISP, ONE OF THE ANTIENT PREACHERS AMONGST THE PEOPLE CALLED QUAKERS. TAKEN IN SHORT HAND, AS THEY WERE DELIVERED BY HIM. Philadelphia: Printed by Joseph Crukshank, 1773. 60pp. Disbound and lightly toned, light rubberstamp on blank verso of title page, else Very Good.

 

     The three Sermons were delivered in 1690, 1691, and 1687.

Evans 12740. Hildeburn 2867.   (29872)        $250.00

 

74.   Crittenden, [Edward] [pseud.?]: THE ENTWINED LIVES OF MISS GABRIELLE AUSTIN, DAUGHTER OF THE LATE REV. ELLIS C. AUSTIN. AND OF REDMOND, THE OUTLAW, LEADER OF THE NORTH CAROLINA "MOONSHINERS." WRITTEN BY BISHOP CRITTENDEN. OF NORTH CAROLINA. THE BISHOP WRITES US: - "I EMPHATICALLY ENDORSE THIS NARRATIVE AS TRUE IN EVERY PARTICULAR. MISS AUSTIN I HAVE KNOWN SINCE SHE WAS AN INFANT..." Philadelphia: Published by Barclay & Co., [1882]. Original printed and illustrated wrappers [spine eroded, forecorners chipped]. [2], 19-80 pp, as issued. "All Rights Reserved." at head of title. Full-page illustrations with English and sometimes German Fraktur captions. Good+.

 

     'Bishop Crittenden's' introduction is dated from Charlotte on February 7, 1879. He vouches for Miss Austin's bona fides; indeed, her father, Reverend Ellis Austin, "was a schoolmate of mine, and a beloved and deeply lamented clergyman in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South." He lends his support to the publication, in order to "call public attention to that cruel relic of barbarism, THE WHIPPING-POST."

     This is the dramatic story of Miss Austin, "a pure and virtuous maiden," who against the background of Reconstruction suffered the indignity of being "whipped by a negro constable" for the crime of theft, of which she was utterly innocent. Other 'Negroes' appear here in the role of villains. Her adventures, romances, and story are told. This is one of the series of 'Barclay's Cheap Publications,' a genre of sensational and lurid narratives, many of them imaginary.

Thornton 2909-2910 and OCLC record other printings, but not this 1882 edition.

   (29052)         $450.00

 

75.   [Cussons, John]: A GLANCE AT CURRENT AMERICAN HISTORY. BY AN EX-CONFEDERATE. Glen Allen, VA: Cussons, May & Company, 1897. 32pp, stitched in original printed glossy wrappers. Some soil to wrappers, small inconspicuous rubberstamp on lower blank portion of page 32, else Very Good.

 

     Cussons defends the reputation of the South against the aspersions of "our Northern friends," who "have deprecated any allusion on our part to the causes or character of the war," and who "have been diligent in a systematic distortion of the leading facts of American history." The result: "our Southland stands to-day pilloried to the scorn of all the world."

     Cussons makes the case that the South fought the War, not to perpetuate Slavery, but to defend the noble cause of State Rights. He attacks "the New England mind" and historians like Goldwin Smith, for vilifying the South.          

FIRST EDITION. Haynes 4374.   (30043)    $250.00

 

76.   Customs Administration: LETTER FROM THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY, ACCOMPANYING A REPORT AND SUNDRY STATEMENTS MADE IN PURSUANCE OF TWO RESOLUTIONS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, OF THE 18TH OF JANUARY, 1796. [Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Childs, 1796]. Folio. 21, [1 blank], [one folded leaf], 25-[26] pp. Untrimmed. Loose, else Near Fine.

 

     Treasury Secretary Wolcott reports to the House of Representatives on value and quantities of, and duties on, all goods imported into the United States, "in each calendar year since the establishment of the revenue under the present government, to the close of December, 1794." He also reports on the tonnage of vessels entering Ports of the United States for the same period, "excluding the repeated Voyages of the same Vessel in one year." Wolcott also explains various defects in record-keeping which have prevented accurate reporting of additional data. A scarce and significant Report on early American commerce.

Evans 31448. NAIP w0252344 [7].             (28798)  $450.00

 

77.   Dakota Territory: GENERAL LAWS AND MEMORIALS AND RESOLUTIONS OF THE TERRITORY OF DAKOTA, PASSED AT THE ELEVENTH SESSION OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, COMMENCED DEC. 7, 1874, AND CONCLUDED JAN. 15, 1875, AT THE CITY OF YANKTON. Yankton, Dakota: W.S. Bowen & Co., Territorial Print., 1875. XVIII, [2], 415, [1] pp. Bound in later legal buckram [title and institutional stamp on spine]. Light rubberstamp on title page, other wise a clean and Fine copy.

 

     Memorial 1 on page 347 is an exceedingly interesting and significant Custer item. It informs "that General Custer has explored the Black Hills, and reports the finding of gold in every locality where the miners prospected." The Memorial petitions Congress and the President to open the Black Hills for settlement, to "abrogate" the Treaty which granted the Black Hills to the Sioux, and "to extinguish the Indian title." After all, the Treaty has already been "numberless times violated by the Sioux Indians." The Treaty "prevents white men from acquiring homesteads, pre-emptions or mining rightts within the great Sioux reservation."

     This petition contributed to Custer's disastrous expedition. Custer and the 7th Calvary had arrived in the Black Hills on July 22, 1874. The unit searched for a suitable fort; civilians successfully prospected for gold; the astonishing riches were duly reported. In late 1875 the Sioux rejected President Grant's offer to purchase the Black Hills; Grant and his cabinet then refused to bar white settlers from the Hills. A mass gold rush ensued; it antagonized the Sioux Indians and erupted into the Great Sioux War of 1876-1877, whose highlight, of course, was Custer's Last Stand. 

     Memorial 2 requestws a division of the Dakota Territory and asking for a new territory to be carved out of the northern part. A detailed Index and Table of Contents are included.

Allen 117.    (29910)   $750.00

 

78.   [Dallas, Minnie]: "LITTLE CUBA:" OR, CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE. BEING A TRUE STORY OF LOVE, WAR, AND STARTLING ADVENTURES. THE MASSACRE OF THE YOUNG STUDENTS! SHOOTING THE MEN FOUND ON THE AMERICAN SHIP "VIRGINIUS." SPANISH DEEDS OF BLOOD-CHILLING ATROCITY! Philadelphia: Barclay & Co., [1883]. Original printed and illustrated purple wrappers [spotted]. [2], 19-94 pp [as issued]. Stitched. Full-page illustrations of the dramatic events described. Good+.

 

     "Miss Minnie Dallas, the daughter of a well-known and wealthy jeweller, in New York City, follows her lover to Cuba. He has been accused of being her father's murderer, but he is innocent." With Minnie's help, he escapes from prison. They flee to Cuba, Minnie in male disguise, and "join the Cuban patriots. She is now "the idol of the men struggling for their freedom." They call her "Little Cuba." She not only provides significant assistance to their revolution, but she also "aids in clearing up the mystery surrounding her lover's life."

     A typically lurid, delightful Barclay production. OCLC records several printings: 1873, 1882, and 1883.

138 Eberstadt 727. OCLC 41549754 [2- Cornell, Hayes Pres. Library] [as of 6/12].   (28918)        $350.00

 

79.   [Davis, Jefferson]: REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ADMISSION OF CADETS INTO THE MILITARY ACADEMY. [Washington: January, 1854]. 3, [1 blank] pp. A folded folio sheet, printed on pale blue paper. Signed by Davis in type and dated at the end. Old folds, Very Good plus.

 

     The Mississippian and future president of the Confederacy, Davis served as Franklin Pierce's Secretary of War. The regulations govern appointment procedures and requirements. "Candidates must be over sixteen and under twenty-one years of age, and free from any deformity, disease, or infirmity, which would render them unfit for the military service." A medical examination is required, with disqualifying conditions listed. The Regulations also list "a synopsis of the course of studies pursued at the Military Academy." These include mathematics, French, Grammar, Drawing, Chemistry, "Natural and Experimental Philosophy," Ethics, Infantry Tactics, etc.

Not located in Sabin or on OCLC.   (29560) $250.00

 

80.   [Defoe, Daniel]: THE TRUE-BORN ENGLISHMAN. A SATIRE. CORRECTED AND ENLARG'D BY THE AUTHOR. London: Printed and Sold by J. Wilford..., 1731. 12mo. [12], 46, [2 publ. advt.] pp. Widely scattered foxing, front free endpaper remargined, else Very Good, in modern cloth.

 

      Preceded by a couple of London printings in the early 1700s, this is a satire on the "Sort of People, who call themselves True-born, and tell long Stories of their Families, and like a Nobleman of Venice, think a Foreigner ought not to walk on the same Side of the Street with them." Defoe's Preface explains the advantages of a Nation, like England, arising from "Mixtures of Blood" of different cultures. After the Preface and Introduction, the 46-page poem is printed. The final leaf is a list of books printed for the Wilford firm.

ESTC N45837 [3- Boston Public, U DE, U Chi.]. OCLC 15673294 [3- U DE, U CA, Nat. Lib. Scotland] [as of 7/12].

   (29041)         $275.00

 

81.   [Della Torre, Peter]: IS SOUTHERN CIVILIZATION WORTH PRESERVING? FROM THE "SOUTHERN QUARTERLY REVIEW," FOR JANUARY, 1851. Charleston, S.C.: Published by the Southern Rights Association., 1851. 39, [1 blank] pp. Disbound and lightly foxed or toned, Good+.

 

     Della Torre allied himself with Charleston colleagues who opposed the Compromise of 1850 and formed the Southern Rights Association. He and his fellows believed that the North had encroached too far on the South's Peculiar Institution, had thus endangered the Southern Way of Life and rendered secession preferable to continuation of the Union. As the result of the Compromise, "the entire machinery of a common government is to be employed for the sole benefit of one portion of the country...But for a firm reliance upon the want of power and determination in the South, the North had not dared to urge its encroachments, even as experiments, much less to have pressed them to their temporary consummation. This is a sad thing to tell, that tyranny is bold because it deems us imbecile." He passionately denounces the South's diminishing power within the Union and the North's hold on the reins of government.

III Turnbull 122. Not in LCP.    (29640)        $450.00

 

82.   Democratic Party in Pennsylvania: PROCEEDINGS OF THE DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION, WHICH ASSEMBLED AT LEWISTOWN, ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 6TH, 1835. Harrisburg: Printed by Crabb & Barrett, 1835. 22, [2 blanks] pp. Disbound, lightly foxed, toned, Good+.

 

     Participants, delegates, Addresses, and proceedings are noted and described. Henry Muhlenberg was nominated unanimously for Governor, and Martin Van Buren for President. The Convention supports the Jackson-Van Buren policies, especially  opposition to the Bank of the United States. "The Bank is still alive; she is again in the field, and you are in the presence of a formidable enemy." 

AI 31322 [5]. OCLC 83067131 [1- NYHS], 16503171 [PA Commonwealth Lib.] [as of September 2012]. Not in Wise & Cronin.   (29335)        $250.00

 

83.   Democratic Republicans of the Town of Newburgh: CIRCULAR. TOWN OF NEWBURGH. AT A MEETING OF THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICANS OF THE TOWN OF NEWBURGH, HELD AT THE HOUSE OF WM. CLEARY, ON THE 24TH OF FEBRUARY, 1848, PURSUANT TO A CALL OF THE TOWN COMMITTEE... [Newburgh, N.Y.: 1848]. Broadside, 6 1/2" x 12". Printed in two columns. Several old horizontal folds, Very Good.

 

     The Town Committee presents nine Resolutions. These express concern at the divisive effects of slavery, deploring "the efforts that are being made to destroy the old land-marks of party destinction [sic] and to form new political divisions." David Wilmot of Pennsylvania had introduced a bill prohibiting slavery in the Territories acquired as a result of the War with Mexico. The Town Committee insists that "no power has been delegated by the Constitution to Congress to abolish slavery where it does exist, or to establish it in any State or Territory where it does not exist, and that the Wilmot Proviso is a phantom."

     The Committee warns fellow Democrats "throughout the State and nation to put on their armor and prepare immediately for the coming conflict" with their political adversaries. The Circular is signed in type at the end by Allen M. Sherman, Robert Sterling, Chauncey B. Gidney, and Daniel A. Deyo; and dated Feb. 29, 1848.

Not located on OCLC, or the online sites of AAS and the Library of Congress.

   (29548)         $350.00

 

84.   Dickinson, Jonathan: A DEFENCE OF PRESBYTERIAN ORDINATION, IN ANSWER TO A PAMPHLET, ENTITULED, A MODEST PROOF OF THE ORDER AND GOVERNMENT SETTLED BY CHRIST, IN THE CHURCH. BY...MINISTER OF THE GOSPEL AT ELIZABETH-TOWN, NEW JERSEY. Boston: Printed for Daniel Henchman, and sold at his Shop, over against the Brick Meeting-House in Cornhill., 1724. [2], iii, [1 blank], 44 pp. Lacking the half title. Disbound, scattered spotting, blank upper corners of several leaves with short chips. Good+.

 

     The first president of the College of New Jersey [now Princeton] and Presbyterian minister, Dickinson consistently supported the independent judgment of American congregations, and opposed the Church of England's establishmentarian claims. Arguing for independence in American religious institutions, just as others would in the political sphere, he denounces the Church of England, "a small upstart Sect," for its "attempt, by Arguments a hundred times baffled, to Unchurch all the Protestant World, but themselves; and to nullify all their Ordinances." Such conduct "Rather exposes their Bigotry to Contempt, than their Zeal and Charity, to the envy of any thinking Person."

FIRST EDITION. Evans 2525. Not in Felcone Collection.   (29431)           $1,250.00

 

85.   Dickson, Dr. S.H.: ADDRESS DELIVERED AT THE INAUGURATION OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL, FOURTH OF JULY, 1856. Charleston, S.C.: Walker, Evans & Co., 1856. 24pp. Disbound, original plain rear wrapper present. Scattered spotting, else Good+.

 

     Dickson orates on the function of public education in a caste society. Dickson applauds South Carolina's expressed policy "that every son and daughter of the superior and dominant race within our borders shall receive all the instructions necessary to prepare them for the responsibilities of their condition as themselves free, and the masters and mistresses of slaves." Even among the slaves, "many of them read and write, and the majority of them are better informed than the laboring classes of the higher races in other countries."

III Turnbull 214. Sabin 20093n.   (29660)      $250.00

 

86.   [Douglas, Stephen A.]: TO THE DEMOCRACY OF THE UNITED STATES. DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ROOMS...JULY 18, 1860. [Baltimore: Murphy & Co., 1860]. 16pp, caption title [as issued]. Disbound and foxed, Good+.

 

     Murphy's imprint appears at the base of page [1]. This is a significant pro-Douglas 1860 election campaign piece. It tells the story of the destruction of the national Democratic Party, the last remaining national political institution, and its split into southern and northern wings after southerners walked out of the Charleston and Baltimore conventions. "Men obsessed with the idea of stopping Douglas at all costs quite readily walked out of the convention with a hope that, in some undefined way, they could walk back in again in a stronger position." Potter, Impending Crisis 414. This pamphlet blames southern extremists for the Party's death, darkly forecasts civil war, and argues that only Senator Douglas and his doctrine of popular sovereignty can prevent dissolution of the Union.

LCP 10305. Sabin 19491.   (28947)   $375.00

 

87.   Dropsie, Moses A.: SUPREME COURT OF PENNSYLVANIA...THOMAS A. BARLOW, ET AL. APPELLANTS, VS. WILLIAM C. PATTERSON, ET AL. APPELLEES. APPEAL FROM THE DECREE OF THE COURT OF NISI PRIUS. MOSES A. DROPSIE, FOR JOHN CLOUDS, ET. AL., ALDERMEN. Philadelphia: E.C. Markley & Son, Printers, [1869]. 23, [1 blank] pp. Stitched in original printed purple wrappers [light color fading]. Near Fine.

 

     A rare printed argument by Dropsie, the prominent lawyer, author, philanthropist, entrepreneur, railroad promoter, President of Gratz College, and a leader of Philadelphia's Jewish community. Representing Philadelphia's Aldermen, Dropsie appeals from a lower court decision enjoining the Aldermen from enforcing a new State law designed to prevent voting fraud. Dropsie argues "the necessity for some law to prevent the perpetration of frauds, and protect the citizen in his right of suffrage." Existing law has not "restrained the commission of frauds in elections" in Philadelphia. The lower court declared that the law's application exclusively to Philadelphia violated the State Constitution's requirement "that elections shall be free and equal." Dropsie explains the true meaning of the "free and equal" clause, and argues that it does not prohibit the enactment.  

OCLC 58445647 [3- U PA, PA State, Hebrew Union] [as of November 2012].

   (29565)         $350.00

 

88.   Dropsie, Moses A.: SYNOPSIS OF ARGUMENT BEFORE THE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE OF THE SENATE OF PENNSYLVANIA. BY MOSES A. DROPSIE, ON BILLS RELATING TO ARRESTS BY PRIVATE PERSONS, AND PAYMENT OF FINES AND PENALTIES TO PRIVATE CORPORATIONS. Philadelphia: Jackson Bros., Printers, [1869]. 8pp. Original printed wrappers, light toning, Near Fine.

 

     A very scarce pamphlet by Dropsie, the prominent lawyer, author, philanthropist, entrepreneur, railroad promoter, President of Gratz College, and a leader of Philadelphia's Jewish community. Here he argues that Pennsylvania's statute, empowering agents of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to make arrests without warrants, "is tyrannical, and fearful...but is more reprehensible when conferred on the irresponsible servants of a private society, however laudable the object of such society may be."

     Dropsie supports his assertions with abundant and compelling citations to the Pennsylvania Constitution, the Magna Charta, and the common law.

FIRST EDITION. OCLC 11642616 [2- Balch Inst., U. PA] [as of September 2012]. Not in Singerman.

   (29396)         $450.00

 

89.   Drowne, Solomon: AN ORATION, DELIVERED AT MARIETTA, APRIL 7, 1789, IN COMMEMORATION OF THE SETTLEMENT FORMED BY THE OHIO COMPANY. BY SOLOMON DROWN, ESQ. M.B. Worcester, Massachusetts: Isaiah Thomas., 1789. Large quarto. [2], 17, [1 blank] pp, with the half title [spotted; within an ornamental border]. Light wear, edgeworn, stitched, scattered foxing. Signed on the half title, 'Solomon H. Drown'. Good+.

 

     "A rare tract" [Thomson]. A prominent surgeon during the Revolution, Drowne left his native Rhode Island in 1788 and, with other Revolutionary War veterans, was among the original settlers of Marietta. The Northwest Territory's first permanent settlement, Marietta was a creation of the Ohio Company, formed in Boston by General Rufus Putnam in 1786 to settle lands along the Ohio River. The Company's activities stimulated Congress to pass the Ordinance of 1787 and begin the Territory's organization. Drowne commemorates the first anniversary of that settlement. He proclaims, "Hail glorious birth day of this western region!" He celebrates the successful resolution of differences with Corn Planter and other Indian chiefs, in the negotiation of which Drowne had assisted.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 21802. Thomson 359. NAIP w028738 [12].   (23047)     $2,500.00

 

90.   Duer, William Alexander: A LETTER, ADDRESSED TO CADWALLADER D. COLDEN, ESQUIRE. IN ANSWER TO THE STRICTURES, CONTAINED IN HIS 'LIFE OF ROBERT FULTON,' UPON THE REPORT OF THE SELECT COMMITTEE, TO WHOM WAS REFERRED A MEMORIAL RELATIVE TO STEAM NAVIGATION, PRESENTED TO THE LEGISLATURE OF NEW-YORK, AT THE SESSION OF 1814. WITH AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING THE SEVERAL LAWS CONCERNING STEAM BOATS; THE PETITIONS PRESENTED FOR THEIR MODIFICATION; AND THE REPORTS OF SELECT COMMITTEES THEREUPON, &C. &C. &C. New York: E. and E. Hosford, 1817. 127, [1 blank] pp, with the half title. Sketch of Fitch's Steam Boat. Bound in modern wrappers. Half title lightly foxed, Very Good.

 

     Colden was Robert Fulton's biographer and chief ally in defending his monopoly, granted by New York State, to navigate the State's waters by boats propelled by fire or steam. Fulton's rivals, particularly Duer, litigated for years the constitutionality of the grant, but failed to overturn Chief Justice James Kent's conclusion that a sovereign's issuance of a monopoly is an essential attribute of sovereignty and, in this case, was wisely granted: otherwise, steamboat navigation, contributing significantly to the public good, could not possibly have been developed with economic viability. Duer presents here a detailed compendium of facts and law in an effort to undermine Fulton's claims and Colden's arguments.

Rink 3615. 134 Eberstadt 602. See Howes D539 [related item].   (28988)   $450.00

 

91.   Duval, John P.: COMPILATION OF THE PUBLIC ACTS OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF THE TERRITORY OF FLORIDA, PASSED PRIOR TO 1840. Tallahassee: Samuel S. Sibley, Printer, 1839. [2], 476, XVI pp. Foxed lightly but persistently. Bound in 20th century cloth, gilt-lettered morocco spine label, gilt-lettered stamp of  institution at base of spine.

bookplate removed from front pastedown. No library marks in text. Very Good.

 

     This is the first and only compilation of the Public Laws of the Florida Territory. An 1839 Resolution of the legislature awarded Duval $2000 for his efforts. Duval, a territorial legislator and brother of Florida's first territorial governor, prepared a detailed Index. The statutes include a thorough slave code and regulation of "Negroes and Mulattoes," civil and criminal procedure, the militia, and other Acts.

135 Eberstadt 297. I Harv. Law Cat. 705. AI 55678 [5]. Not in Cohen.

   (29988)         $1,250.00

 

92.   Dye, John Smith: THE ADDER'S DEN; OR, SECRETS OF THE GREAT CONSPIRACY TO OVERTHROW LIBERTY IN AMERICA. DEPRAVITY OF SLAVERY: TWO PRESIDENTS SECRETLY ASSASSINATED BY POISON. UNSUCCESSFUL ATTEMPTS TO MURDER THREE OTHERS. -- THE EVIDENCE CONCLUSIVE, AND THE FACTS ESTABLISHED. TOGETHER WITH THE DYING STRUGGLES OF THE GREAT  SOUTHERN REBELLION. New York: Published by the Author, 1864. 128pp. Bound in somewhat later cloth [moderate wear, inner hinges reinforced, one of two front free endpapers torn away], with original printed wrapper laid down on front cover. Text lightly toned and Very Good.

 

     The "traffic in human flesh is an unpardonable sin against human nature. It has been our greatest national sin against the Holy Ghost, which can be forgiven neither in this life nor the life that is to come." Despite the Founders' great accomplishments, "they left it in the power of the States to retain the most dreadful foe of humanity that had reached their time." The book describes the crimes of the Slave Power: expanding and perpetuating human slavery; John C. Calhoun's conspiracy to attempt the assassinations of President Jackson, to poison General Harrison; treason, etc., etc. The blame for the "terrible war now raging" rests exclusively on "the Southern slaveholders and their Northern abettors."

FIRST EDITION. Howes D617. Bartlett 1430. Sabin 21579. Not in Monaghan.

   (30020)         $500.00

 

93.   Edwards, Jonathan: A TREATISE CONCERNING RELIGIOUS AFFECTIONS, IN THREE PARTS...BY JONATHAN EDWARDS, A.M. AND PASTOR OF THE FIRST CHURCH IN NORTHAMPTON.  THE SECOND EDITION. New York: J. Parker, for Garrat Noel, 1768. [2], vi, 470, [9], [1 blank] pp. Bound in contemporary calf [rubbed, spine chip but an attractive 18th century American binding], with raised spine bands. Free endpapers absent. Light to moderate foxing, Good+.

 

     Originally published in 1746, this is the second of five 18th century American editions of "the supreme expression of Edwards's psychology of religion." DAB.

Evans 10890.   (29834)           $600.00

 

94.   Election of 1828: THE PRESIDENTIAL QUESTION. THE PEOPLE OF OUR HITHERTO FREE AND HAPPY REPUBLIC, ARE SHORTLY TO DECIDE THE IMPORTANT QUESTION...THE PRESIDENT SHOULD BE A FRIEND TO EQUAL RIGHTS. [np: 1828]. 8pp, stitched, lightly foxed with light toning and some dusting, Good+.

 

     Jackson is not a friend to equal rights: his votes at the Tennessee Constitutional Convention favor property qualifications for the suffrage. Moreover, his "hostility to equal rights is further illustrated by his putting the six Militia-men to death, while he suffered their officers to escape with dismission from service." Adams, on the other hand, has voted right on suffrage qualifications. Unlike the plain republican Adams, Jackson lives in "splendid style, with his black servants;" he is a dictator and a liar, charges proven by an examination of his military service, undertaken here with vindictive glee. Adding to the litany of Jackson's offenses is Thomas Hart Benton who, in an 1813 letter published here, describes Jackson's unprovoked attack on him, "the most outrageous affray ever witnessed in a civilized country."

OCLC 36085027 [1- Lib. Cong.], 9354399 [1- Wm & Mary] [as of September 2012]. 470 NUC 0563539 [3]. Not in Sabin, Wise & Cronin, AI, Miles, Eberstadt, Decker.

   (29324)         $450.00

 

95.   Election of 1840: PROPOSITION TO EXTEND THE BRITISH FUNDING SYSTEM TO THE UNITED STATES. THE HARTFORD CONVENTION LEADER OF THE BRITISH WHIGS NEGOTIATING FOR THE SALE OF THE LAND AND LABOR OF THE COUNTRY TO BRITISH FUND-MONGERS. FREEMEN! WILL YOU CONSENT TO THE TRANSFER? THE MONEY POWER OF ENGLAND AND THE BRITISH WHIGS IN AMERICA- PROPOSITION TO MORTGAGE THE WHOLE COUNTRY TO THE BRITISH FUNDHOLDERS FOR THREE HUNDRED MILLIONS OF DOLLARS. [Albany]: Rough-Hewer Extra, [1840]. 8pp, folio Extra of this short-lived New York Democratic periodical. Untrimmed and uncut, generously margined. A couple of short margin fold splits, light foxing. Good+ or so.

 

     A bombastic essay charging that the Whig Party is, like the wolf in sheep's clothing, in reality the old Hartford Convention Federalists, a bunch of  Anglophiles in disguise. Their policies, and their conspiratorial "scheme" with England, are "dangerous to the purity of legislation, hostile to the genius of a free government, and directly at war with our constitution."

Not in Sabin or American Imprints. OCLC 37969403 [3-  NYHS, LCP, OH Hist. Soc.] [as of 5/12].   (28873)            $450.00

 

96.   Election of 1840: SPIRIT OF '76. NO. 21. Nashville, Ten. : [S. Nye & Co.], August 5, 1840. 16pp [pp (321)-336], disbound and loosened, blank edges a bit brittle. Lightly toned, Good+. With an attractive woodcut of Whig candidate William Henry Harrison, surrounded by a Harrison-Tyler flag, stacked rifles, a farmhouse and farm implements.

 

     Printed in 33 weekly issues for the campaign of 1840, this rare item denounces the extravagance and profligacy of the Van Buren administration, with example after example of expenditures for unnecessary furniture, tableware, and other aristocratic emblems for the White House. This issue also prints Harrison's rebuttal to the rumor that he is "averse to foreigners."-

Allen 1723. TN Imprints Inventory 457. Sabin 89485. Not in Miles or Wise & Cronin.

   (28911)         $250.00

 

97.   Election of 1844: WHIG TEXT BOOK, OR DEMOCRACY UNMASKED. TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES. [Washington: Gideon's office, 1844]. 31, [1 Index] pp. Caption title [as issued]. Stitched and untrimmed. Lightly foxed, Good+. 

 

     A Whig presidential campaign pamphlet, arraigning Polk and the Democrats as the party of "TEXAS OR DISUNION." Fearing anti-slavery Whigs' defection from their candidate Henry Clay, whose waffling on Texas would drive them to the new Liberty Party, this document emphasizes Polk's opposition to the Whig program of internal improvements and a protective tariff. "Down with the Tariff is the universal cry of those now advocating the cause of Polk and Texas." 

FIRST EDITION. AI 44-6596 [5]. Sabin 20659 [attributing to John L. Dorsey]. Not in Miles, Eberstadt, Decker, Streeter [TX], LCP.

   (29144)         $250.00

 

98.   [Fairchild, Rev. Joy H(amlet)]: "TIMES" REPORT. TRIAL OF REV. JOY HAMLET FAIRCHILD, ON A CHARGE OF ADULTERY WITH MISS RHODA DAVIDSON. REPORTED FOR THE BOSTON DAILY TIMES, BY J.E.P. WEEKS, ESQ. [Boston: 1845]. 32pp. Caption title, as issued. Folded and unbound. Generously margined. Light spine wear, light toning, else Very Good.

 

     One of several publications about this celebrated, notorious case, consuming much contemporary print. Fairchild allegedly seduced a young woman, Rhoda Davidson, of Edgecomb, Maine, while she was a domestic in his family. She had a child, and nominated Fairchild as the father. Fairchild claimed that rival ministers had defamed him by calling him an habitual libertine and adulterer. This pamphlet includes witnesses' testimony, including that of Miss Davidson. "In all, he might have had 15 or 20 connections with me." The pamphlet closes with the verdict of Not Guilty; "the audience burst out in involuntary applause, which was immediately checked." Another, earlier issue does not include the jury verdict, the pamphlet noting that deliberations were ongoing.

AI 45-2299 [2]. BEAL 13693.    (29496)       $250.00

 

99.   [Farmer, A]: AN ESSAY ON THE AMERICAN SYSTEM: OR REASONS WHY THE PRODUCTIVE CLASSES SHOULD NOT SUPPORT HENRY CLAY FOR THE PRESIDENCY. Washington: Spectator Office, 1844. 14, [2 blanks] pp. Disbound and lightly worn, Good+.

 

     The author, who identifies himself at the end as 'A Farmer', argues that "farmers, mechanics, and others of the productive classes of the country" should oppose Henry Clay for the presidency. Clay's 'American System' -- tariffs, internal improvements, and a national bank-- is an "abominable deception" benefiting a "tribe of speculators" rather than the producers of wealth. He urges voters to "distrust the smooth speeches and honeyed words" of Clay and his supporters. In fact, Clay has "a deep-rooted aversion to the productive classes," and seeks "to enslave the people, by breaking down all the constitutional barriers."  

AI 44-2232 [4].   (28877)       $250.00

 

100.   [Filley, William]: LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF WILLIAM FILLEY, WHO WAS STOLEN FROM HIS HOME IN JACKSON, MICH., BY THE INDIANS, AUGUST 3D, 1837, AND HIS SAFE RETURN FROM CAPTIVITY, OCTOBER 19, 1866, AFTER AN ABSENCE OF 29 YEARS. Chicago: Published by Filley & Ballard, 1867. 112pp + eight full-page plates. Bound in contemporary paper covered boards and cloth spine [moderately worn]. Front free endpaper loose and chipped. Text lightly worn, about Very Good. Laid in is an 1896 newspaper story about the death of Filley. 

 

     This second edition was published in the same year as the first. "An interesting captivity, giving an account of the manners and customs of the various tribes among whom Filley lived-- Sioux, Comanches, Osages, Walla Wallas, Arapahoes, etc.; Life in the Rocky Mountains and Oregon; hunting lion, grizzly bears, Rocky Mountain sheep; etc." [Eberstadt].

     The author dedicates this edition "to that NOBLE BAND of early pioneers of Michigan, whose arduous and untiring efforts in the great search, and common sympathies for the 'LONG LOST JACKSON BOY,' and heart broken parents, deserve the highest mark of affection, and lasting remembrance." A detailed table of contents, with prefatory remarks assuring that the "affidavits and certificates" presented here "are bona fide, the parties making them being respectable and reliable people," precedes the narrative.

Howes F128 "aa." Ayer 98. Field 535. Graff 1322. Ante-Fire Imprints 1189. 111 Eberstadt 285.

   (29681)         $1,250.00

 

101.   [Fillmore, Millard]: FACTS FOR THE PEOPLE. "TRUTH IS MIGHTY, AND WILL PREVAIL." [np: 1856]. 16pp. Caption title, as issued. Folded and untrimmed, with generous margins. Light dusting, else Very Good.

 

     OCLC references to an 1852 publication date are incorrect. The Fillmore-Donelson ticket sought the presidency in 1856 under the American Party [Know-Nothing] banner. This pamphlet reports that "the prospects of Fillmore and Donelson are becoming brighter every day," as voters experience increasing disgust with "Southern extremists" and "Northern fanatics." Fillmore, who presided over the Compromise of 1850 as President, steers a middle course in the interests of  "his country, his whole country, and nothing but his country." With Fillmore's election, "harmony will be restored at home, and peace abroad." All the "Old-line Whigs"-- including, for example, Rives of Virginia and Bates of Missouri-- support him, as do newspapers north and south. And, if Henry Clay were living, he would support Fillmore too. Fremont and Buchanan are unacceptable alternatives. The pamphlet is silent on the anti-immigrant stance of the Know-Nothings.

Not in Sabin or Eberstadt. OCLC locates five copies under two accession numbers [as of 5/12].

   (28882)         $375.00

 

102.   Forsyth, William and William Cobbett: A TREATISE ON THE CULTURE AND MANAGEMENT OF FRUIT TREES; IN WHICH A NEW METHOD OF PRUNING AND TRAINING IS FULLY DESCRIBED. TOGETHER WITH OBSERVATIONS ON THE DISEASES, DEFECTS, AND INJURIES, IN ALL KINDS OF FRUIT AND FOREST TREES; AS ALSO, AN ACCOUNT OF A PARTICULAR METHOD OF CURE, MADE PUBLIC BY ORDER OF THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT. BY...GARDENER TO HIS MAJESTY AT KENSINGTON AND ST. JAMES'S. TO WHICH ARE ADDED, AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES, ADAPTING THE RULES OF THE TREATISE TO THE CLIMATE AND SEASONS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. BY WILLIAM COBBETT. Philadelphia: 1802. Original calf, rebacked. xii, 259 pp, complete with half title. Thirteen engraved plates, most folding. Very Good.

 

     This or the New York printing is the first edition, evidently the first book published in America to be devoted wholly to fruit trees. It was followed by Albany and Philadelphia printings the next year, and was originally printed in London without Cobbett's introduction and notes. Each plate is of a different tree, and is accompanied by explanatory text. Cobbett's introduction informs that the importance of producing hardier fruit trees in America warrants his temporary withdrawal from the political scene to adapt Forsyth's work.

AI 2236 [4]. Rink 1642. Sabin 25155. Not in Eberstadt, Decker.

   (29754)         $450.00

 

103.   Foxcroft, Thomas: A DISCOURSE PREPARATORY TO THE CHOICE OF A MINISTER. BEING THE SUBSTANCE OF TWO SERMONS PREACH'D TO THE OLD OR FIRST GATHER'D CHURCH IN BOSTON, JUNE 11. 1727. THE LORD'S DAY BEFORE THEIR ELECTION OF A COLLEAGUE-PASTOR. BY THOMAS FOXCROFT, A.M., PASTOR OF SAID CHURCH. Boston, N.E.: Printed by Gamaliel Rogers in Long Lane for Samuel Gerrish at the lower end of Cornhill., 1727. [4], 67, [3 blank] pp, with the half title and final blank. Disbound. Some spotting and staining. Contemporary signature and notations of Solomon Townsend on final blank leaf. Good.

 

     Foxcroft "was learned, devout, and a good logician, and was admired both for his talents and for the elegance of his manners" [Appleton's]. In these sermons preached on the same day, Foxcroft focuses on Acts I: 24-25 in asking the congregation to pray fervently so that the "Lord Jesus Christ wou'd shew whom He hath chosen" as the new minister. This is the only 18th century American printing.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 2871.   (29138)      $500.00

 

104.   Foxcroft, Thomas: GOD THE JUDGE, PUTTING DOWN, AND SETTING UP ANOTHER. A SERMON UPON OCCASION OF THE DEATH OF OUR LATE SOVEREIGN LORD KING GEORGE, AND THE ACCESSION OF HIS PRESENT MAJESTY, KING GEORGE, II. TO THE BRITISH THRONE. Boston, in New-England: Printed for S. Gerrish at the lower end of Cornhill, 1727. [4], v [i.e., iv], 39, [1 blank] pp, with the half title [as issued]. Disbound, scattered spotting, Good+ or so.

 

     This is the only 18th century American printing. Foxcroft "was learned, devout, and a good logician, and was admired both for his talents and for the elegance of his manners" [Appleton's]. He dedicates his sermon, which praises the "conspicuous Excellencies and most auspicious Reign" of the late King, to William Dummer, "Lieut. governour & Commander in Chief, in and over his Majesty's Province of the Massachusetts-Bay." Foxcroft expresses gratitude for the "marvellous Methods of Providence" in "the blessed Reformation from Popery" and the "Salvation that has been nigh to New-England!"

FIRST EDITION. Evans 2873.    (29107)     $500.00

 

105.   Franklin, Benjamin: THE WORKS OF THE LATE DR. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. CONSISTING OF HIS LIFE, WRITTEN BY HIMSELF. TOGETHER WITH ESSAYS, HUMOROUS, MORAL, AND LITERARY, CHIEFLY IN THE MANNER OF THE SPECTATOR. New York: John Tiebout, 1798. Engraved frontispiece of Franklin in his coonskin cap, by Maverick. 184, 104, [2], [2 blank] pp, as issued. Contemporary tree calf, rebacked. Original gilt-lettered [but dulled] morocco spine label laid down. Light foxing, Very Good.

 

     The Preface includes Richard Price's Letter.

Evans 33758. Ford 447.    (29410)     $250.00

 

106.   [Franklin Imprint] Rutty, John: THE LIBERTY OF THE SPIRIT AND OF THE FLESH DISTINGUISHED: IN AN ADDRESS TO THOSE CAPTIVES IN SPIRIT AMONG THE PEOPLE CALLED QUAKERS, WHO ARE COMMONLY CALLED LIBERTINES. BY JOHN RUTTY, AN UNWORTHY MEMBER OF THAT COMMUNITY. [Philadelphia] Dublin, Printed: Philadelphia, Reprinted: B. Franklin and D. Hall, 1759. 64pp. Bound in modern leather. Mild wear. An attractive copy, Very Good.

 

     "First published in 1756. Late in 1759 the Society of Friends in Philadelphia ordered the publication of this piece in an edition of 4000 copies" [Miller]. An Irish Quaker and Dublin physician, Rutty wrote books on Ireland, religion, and natural history. "Rutty, an orthodox Quaker, the historian of Irish Quakerism, deprecated the worldliness of his co-religionists, and their contemporary neglect of the Holy Bible, and the historical facts of revelation." Richard S. Harrison, DR. JOHN RUTTY OF DUBLIN: A QUAKER POLYMATH IN THE ENLIGHTENMENT [2011]. 

     His well-known tendency minutely to dissect his own faults, and those of others, is suggested by the chapter headings of this book: Sect I. Of Recreations, Sect II. Of Superfluities in Meats, Drinks, Apparel and Furniture. Sect III. Of Superfluity in Trading. Sect IV. Of the vain Honours of this World. Sect V. Of the Payment of Tythes. Sect VI. Of the Observation of the Days, called Holy-days.

Evans 8486. Miller 719. Hildeburn 1642.   (30026)   $1,750.00

 

107.   Gadsden, John: AN EULOGY, ON THE LATE KEATING LEWIS SIMONS, ESQ. PRONOUNCED IN ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH, ON THE TENTH OF SEPTEMBER, 1819; BY APPOINTMENT OF THE REVOLUTION SOCIETY, AND PUBLISHED AT THEIR REQUEST. Charleston: W.P. Young & Son, Print., [1819]. [2], 25, [1 blank] pp. Stitched, with the decorative half title [light spotting]. Untrimmed, light wear, Very Good.

 

     Simons was a well-regarded member of the Charleston Bar. He died in a duel with Governor John Lyde Wilson, an experienced and enthusiastic duelist who wrote dueling's bible, The Code of Honor. Gadsden's Eulogy is preceded by Resolutions of the Bar, mourning his death and praising his character. Gadsden's Eulogy is a detailed chronicling of his career and celebration of his many virtues. "Honor was the lamp of his life. He revolted at any thing mean and little and base." 

II Turnbull 41. AI 48058 [4].   (29704)          $350.00

 

108.   Gallatin, Albert: THE SPEECH OF ALBERT GALLATIN, A REPRESENTATIVE FROM THE COUNTY OF FAYETTE, IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF PENNSYLVANIA, ON THE IMPORTANT QUESTION TOUCHING THE VALIDITY OF THE ELECTIONS HELD IN THE FOUR WESTERN COUNTIES OF THE STATE, ON THE 14TH DAY OF OCTOBER, 1794. WITH NOTES AND AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING SUNDRY DOCUMENTS RELATIVE TO THE WESTERN INSURRECTION. Philadelphia: Printed by William W. Woodward, 1795. 66pp, stitched as issued. Lightly dusted, lightly spotted, last leaf clipped at lower blank margin, Good+.

 

     Gallatin resided in Western Pennsylvania, the heart of the protests against Alexander Hamilton's excise tax on whiskey. He had been elected to the U.S. Senate in 1793, but the Federalist-dominated Senate refused him a seat on the ground he had not been a naturalized citizen for the requisite nine years. He returned to Fayette County during the height of the Whiskey Rebellion, and was elected to Western Pennsylvania's Rebel Assembly. In that capacity he delivered this speech, his first printed work during a long, distinguished, and eventful career.

     "In this crisis Gallatin played a dominant role. With superb courage and persuasive oratory he faced the excited and armed crowd, enheartened the moderates, won over the wavering, and at last secured a vote of 34 to 23 in the revolutionary committee of sixty for peaceable submission to the law of the country. It is hardly an exaggeration to say that Gallatin saved western Pennsylvania from a civil war" [DAB]. Gallatin's Speech is an extraordinarily detailed review of this critical period, the first serious challenge to federal authority in the new Republic.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 28722. Sabin 26395.   (27657)      $3,000.00

 

109.   Gallatin, Albert: SUGGESTIONS ON THE BANKS AND CURRENCY OF THE SEVERAL UNITED STATES, IN REFERENCE PRINCIPALLY TO THE SUSPENSION OF SPECIE PAYMENTS. New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1841. [1-title], [1], [1-contents], [1 blank], [9]-124pp [as issued]. Disbound, light blindstamp on title page, else Very Good. Slip of paper bound in after title page with manuscript notations. Ink signature of Robert C. Winthrop, Representative from Massachusetts and later Speaker of the House, at top margin of title page.

 

     This is one of two pamphlets establishing Gallatin's reputation as perhaps the most sophisticated antebellum American writer on banking. Seldom seen on the market, it is a critique of the American currency and banking system, with a program for reform.  Gallatin had led the successful effort by New York bankers to resume specie payments after the Panic of 1837. But in October 1839 the U.S. Bank of Pennsylvania again suspended specie payments; banks followed suit everywhere except in New England, New York, and New Jersey. In 1841 specie payments still had not resumed in Philadelphia and in many other parts of the country.

     The benefits of a paper currency, says Gallatin, are overestimated. The substitution of paper for specie currency is permissible only if it convertible on demand into an equal amount of specie. Because specie payments are widely suspended, bank notes are severely depreciated, especially because bank historically extend their loans and discounts imprudently. Thus "the present situation of the currency in the United States is worse than that of any other country.,,,[T]o have no issue of paper would be preferable to the current state of things" (p. 24).

AI 41-2058 [5]. Sabin 26397.    (29925)        $350.00

 

110.   [Garfield, James A.]: COMPLETE MEDICAL RECORD OF PRESIDENT GARFIELD'S CASE, CONTAINING ALL OF THE OFFICIAL BULLETINS, FROM THE DATE OF THE SHOOTING TO THE DAY OF HIS DEATH, TOGETHER WITH THE OFFICIAL AUTOPSY, MADE SEPTEMBER 20, 1881, AND A DIAGRAM SHOWING THE COURSE TAKEN BY THE BALL. COMPILED FROM THE RECORDS OF THE EXECUTIVE MANSION. Washington: Chas. A. Wimer, Publisher, 1881 . [2], 106, [1], [1 blank] pp. Stitched as issued. Untrimmed [bit of chipping at blank untrimmed edges], lightly dusted, else Very Good. Facsimile letter, as issued, dated October 1, 1881; 'Diagram Showing the Course taken by the Ball' at page [107].

 

     Poor Garfield was more likely killed by bad medical care than by the assassin's bullet. Medical notes describe his condition several times daily; and the autopsy report is printed.

OCLC locates seven copies under two accession numbers, as of November 2012.

   (29574)         $375.00

 

111.   Gee, Joshua: ISRAEL'S MOURNING FOR AARON'S DEATH. A SERMON PREACHED ON THE LORD'S DAY AFTER THE DEATH OF THE VERY REVEREND AND LEARNED COTTON MATHER, D.D. AND F.R.S. PASTOR OF THE NORTH CHURCH IN BOSTON: WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE, FEBRUARY 13. 1727-8. AET LXVI. BY...PASTOR OF THE SAME CHURCH. Boston, New-England: Printed for S. Gerrish at the lower End of Cornhill, and N. Belknap, near Searlets-Wharff., 1728. [2], 34 pp. Lacking the half title and final blank. With the Errata statement at the bottom of page 34. Several closed tears to title leaf, but without loss. Otherwise, lightly toned and dusted. Good or so.

 

     Mather's assistant, Gee succeeded him as Pastor of the North Church. Gee explains "the shining parts" of Mather's character: "The capacity of his mind; the readiness of his wit; the vastness of his reading; the strength of his memory...He was pious, but not affected; serious without moroseness; grave, but not austere; affable without meanness; and facetious without levity. He was peaceable in his temper; but zealous against sin. He was a strenuous nonconformist to uninstituted ceremonies imposed upon conscience..."

FIRST EDITION. Evans 3031. II Holmes, Cotton Mather 745.

   (29433)         $650.00

 

112.   [George, John H.]: LETTER FROM COL. GEORGE. CONCORD, N.H. AUG. 6, 1860. [Concord: William Butterfield, Editor N.H. Patriot, 1860]. Broadside, 10" x 13 1/2". Printed in four columns, Very Good.

 

     George was a New Hampshire lawyer, Democrat, and New Hampshire's U.S. Attorney during the 1850s. His broadside urges the election of Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois-- who was born in neighboring Vermont -- for the presidency. In doing so, he undertakes an analysis of the Dred Scott case, the candidates' positions on that decision, and on the Kansas-Nebraska Act. He urges "every New Hampshire Democrat," regardless of where he stands on Dred Scott, to "cast his vote in such a way as will tell most strongly against Mr. Lincoln." Although other candidates-- Bell and Breckinridge-- oppose Lincoln's program to restrict the spread of slavery, the best way to defeat Lincoln is to support Douglas, the endorsed candidate of "the regular party organization." 

     Moreover, the New Hampshire Democratic Party stands against the religious and ethnic bias of the Know-Nothings, who "pandered to local prejudices against Catholics and foreigners to obtain power in New Hampshire."

OCLC locates six copies [as of August 2012] under three accession numbers. Stern Collection of Lincolniana at the Library of Congress, #4694.

   (29291)         $1,000.00

 

113.   Georges Canal Company: RATES OF TOLL, TOGETHER WITH THE RULES AND REGULATIONS RELATING TO THE GEORGES CANAL COMPANY, FOR THE YEAR 1849. Thomaston [ME]: David J. Starrett, Printer., 1849. 3" x 5 1/2". 6, [2] pp. Stitched in contemporary plain wrappers. Small chip at blank lower forecorners, Very Good.

 

     The Company was incorporated in the State of Maine in 1846. Its mission was to render the Georges River navigable, for doing which the Company was authorized to charge tolls. This evidently unrecorded imprint sets toll rates for a variety of products, and the rules affecting passage down the River. The last page advertises Starrett's "Thomaston Book Store!!"

Not located on OCLC, AAS's website, or in Sabin, Williamson, Eberstadt.

   (29960)         $450.00

 

114.   Georgia Democratic Party in the Election of 1860: GEORGIA POLITICS. [FROM THE AUGUSTA CONSTITUTIONALIST.]| THE DOUBLE CONVENTION. - TO THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY OF RICHMOND COUNTY. - NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION. - TO THE DEMORATIC PARTY OF GEORGIA. - PLATFORM AND RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY THE NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC STATES CONVENTION. - LOUISIANA DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION. THE DOUBLE CONVENTION. [Augusta, GA?: 1860?]. 10pp, folded, some loosening and light blank edge chipping. Caption title [as issued]. Good+.

 

     The National Democratic Party's 1860 Convention met first at Charleston, and adjourned with a decision to meet again at Baltimore. The Georgia delegation split into two factions: the first, led by William Lowndes Yancey of Alabama, decided to form a new political party based exclusively on Southern Rights, especially the National Government's obligation to protect slavery and slaveholders in all the Territories. The second faction wished to continue working within the National Democratic Party. A State Convention at Milledgeville was called in an effort to resolve the dispute. After the Yancey faction lost, it issued this "appeal from the Milledgeville verdict." This pamphlet reviews the issues involved in the conflict, and presents the resolutions and platforms of the two factions.  

II Renne 609. OCLC 668994047 [1-U GA] [as of 7/12].   (28932)  $950.00

 

115.   Godwin, William: ENQUIRY CONCERNING POLITICAL JUSTICE, AND ITS INFLUENCE ON MORALS AND HAPPINESS. FIRST AMERICAN FROM THE SECOND LONDON EDITION. CORRECTED. Philadelphia: Printed by Bioren and Madan, 1796. 12mo. Two volumes, each with the half title. Volume I: xvi, [1], 22-362 pp. Volume II: viii, 400 pp. Bound in contemporary sheep, rebacked in period style, volume II with a new gilt-lettered red morocco spine label; volume I with its original spine label. Light foxing, occasional tanning and minor wear, Very Good.

 

     The Enquiry "was one of the earliest, the clearest, and most absolute theoretical expressions of socialist and anarchist doctrines. Godwin believed that the motives of all human action were subject to reason, that reason taught benevolence, and that therefore all rational creatures could live in harmony without laws and institutions...." [PMM]. "Through his influence on Thompson and Owen, Godwin contributed greatly to the early socialist movement in America. His opposition to revolution has caused him to be disdained by modern radicals"  [Adams].

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. Evans 30493. Printing and the Mind of Man 243. Adams, Radical Literature in America 40. Cohen 5765.     (29336)  $1,250.00

 

116.   Goodell, William: THE AMERICAN SLAVE CODE IN THEORY AND PRACTICE: ITS DISTINCTIVE FEATURES SHOWN BY ITS STATUTES, JUDICIAL DECISIONS, AND ILLUSTRATIVE FACTS. 1853. Original cloth, stamped in blind with title stamped in gilt on spine. 10, ix, [1 blank], [13]-431, [1], pp [as issued]. Title page lightly toned, occasional mild foxing, Very Good plus.

 

     The first four editions were published in 1853; this is the stated fourth. The "Catalogue of Books, Pamphlets, Tracts, etc., published and for sale at the Anti-Slavery Depository, 48 Beekman Street, New York," comprises the first ten pages, preceding the title page. This book is "the best known" of the pre-Civil War "descriptions of slave codes and their administration" [Robert Cover, Justice Accused 149].

     One of the Founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society, Goodell was a constitutional utopian, arguing that the Constitution itself provided the authority necessary to abolish slavery. He relied on the Constitution's Preamble-- the government's duty to "establish Justice" and "secure the blessings of Liberty"-- and the Declaration of Independence to define the libertarian, anti-slavery purpose of American organic law. He thus delineates the law of bondage in the different States as a litany of illegitimacy, evil, and oppression.

Dumond 60. Work 342. LCP 4164. Cohen 9837.   (30016)  $350.00

 

117.   [Goodenow, Sterling]: A BRIEF TOPOGRAPHICAL AND STATISTICAL MANUAL OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK: EXHIBITING THE SITUATION AND BOUNDARIES OF THE SEVERAL COUNTIES-- THE CITIES, TOWNS, MOUNTAINS, LAKES, RIVERS, CREEKS, &C. IN EACH.-- THE VILLAGES AND OTHER PLACES WITHIN THE LIMITS OF EACH TOWN--- DISTANCES FROM THE SEAT OF GOVERNMENT, &C. AND DESIGNATING THE PRINCIPAL PLACES AND THE SEAT OF THE COURTS, &C. IN EACH COUNTY-- THE PLACES IN WHICH POST-OFFICES ARE KEPT-- THE INCORPORATED VILLAGES, &C. SECOND EDITION- ENLARGED AND IMPROVED. CONTAINING, ALSO, AN ACCOUNT OF THE GRAND CANALS; THE POPULATION OF EACH TOWN AND COUNTY- THE SITUATION OF THE FINANCES, PROPERTY, AND OTHER PUBLICK CONCERNS OF THE STATE- WITH MUCH OTHER STATISTICAL MATTER. New York: Published by E. Bliss and E. White...Printed by D. Fanshaw., 1822. 88pp. Disbound, toned, scattered foxing [title leaf substantially so]. Good to Good+.

 

     This guide to New York State is an impressive little book, the contents treating the subjects outlined in the title. Bristling with data, it includes many tables, remarks on methodology, and observations by the author on the difficulties that he encountered in this undertaking. "Contains information on canals" [Rink], as well as material on looms, tanneries, distilleries, breweries, hat factories, and other early New York business enterprises. This printing also includes, from pages 72-88, a Supplement of "new facts" which occurred while the book was "in the press."

SECOND EDITION. Howes G237. Rink 353. AI 8855 [1822, 72pp].

   (29472)         $250.00

 

118.   Gordon, Alexander S.; Matthew L. Davis; James Cheetham: NEW-YORK, OCTOBER 29TH, 1800. BRETHREN, WE ARE DIRECTED BY WASHINGTON LODGE, TO LAY BEFORE YOU THE RESULT OF THEIR DELIBERATIONS ON THE PROPOSED NEW CONSTITUTION FOR THE GRAND LODGE:... New York: 1800. 2 pp, plus integral final blank, folded to letter size and addressed to George D. Wickham, Esq., Master of Orange Lodge 45, Goshen. Wear and soil to blank inner margins, a few pinholes that slightly affect small portions of 4 or 5 letters, light wear. Signed in type by Gordon, Davis, and Cheetham. Certified in type by John Aird, Secretary, on October 28, 5800 [1800]. Good+. 

 

     An apparently unrecorded New York imprint, documenting the authors' "Dissent" from the proposed new Constitution of the Grand Lodge of the State of New York. The proposal violates "the great leading principle of Masonic institutions," i.e., "the sacred and indestructible right of every Lodge to elect its own officers" and the "equal rights of their members." The new Constitution places power in the hands of unelected Masonic officials, particularly the Grand Master, "upon the spurious supposition, viz. that he is infallible." Moreover, "Officers unknown to the Masonic world" are also granted powers rightly belonging to the membership. Cheetham and Davis were allies of Aaron Burr in the complicated world of early New York politics.

     Washington Lodge was formed in March 1800 by several members of the Phoenix Lodge of the State of New York. The Washington Lodge, along with others, debated and voted on the proposed Constitution, which had been drafted by DeWitt Clinton and several others. Of 42 constituent Lodges, only 17 favored the new Constitution, which was thus rejected in December 1800. See, Ross, A Standard History of Freemasonry in the State of New York, pages 137-139 [1899].

Not located in Evans, Bristol, Shipton & Mooney, NAIP, or on OCLC [as of February 2013] or the online websites of AAS, Huntington or the other usual sources.

   (26704)         $2,000.00

 

119.   Gordon, William: A SERMON PREACHED BEFORE THE HONORABLE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, ON THE DAY INTENDED FOR THE CHOICE OF COUNSELLORS, AGREEABLE TO THE ADVICE OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS. Watertown: Benjamin Edes, 1775. 29, [1 blank] pp, with the half title. Disbound and lightly foxed, a bit loosened, else Very Good. Attractive ornament at page 29.

 

     Gordon "was a vigorous partisan of independence and in 1775 was made chaplain to both houses of the Provincial Congress assembled at Watertown. Congress possessed great confidence in him and voted him a good horse and access to the prisoners of war...He delivered the election sermon before the General Court on July 19, 1775 [this item]." DAB.

     Likening Americans to the early children of Israel, Gordon-- author of  the "first full-scale history of this war by an American" [Howes]-- admonishes those who "tremble at the thoughts of that power with whom we are to contend." But, listing America's advantages in the struggle, he says, "God has wonderfully appeared for us, crowning our military operations with unusual success, and disconcerting those of the enemy." The unity of the Colonies, their distance from England, the British debt and "most alarming prospects to the merchant," and our "officers of courage" will win the day.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 14073. Lapham Newberry Library 235. Adams Independence 168.

   (29058)         $2,500.00

 

120.   [Grant, Ulysses S.]  : OBSEQUIES OF GEN'L U.S. GRANT, NEW YORK CITY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 7 AND 8, 1885. IN MEMORY OF THE SUCCESFUL GENERAL AND HONORED STATESMAN. [Buffalo: Matthews, Northrup & Co., Art-Printing Works., 1885]. Folio sheet, folded to 8 1/2" x 11." [4] pp. Caption title [as issued], with portraits of Grant on pages [1] and [3], sketches of the house where he was born and the house where he died on page [2], and a copy of his famous note to General Buckner insisting on "unconditional and immediate surrender." Very Good.

 

     The pamphlet is a railroad promotional. Page [4] advertises the New York, West Shore & Buffalo Railway, which offers round trip tickets between Buffalo and New York for the funeral ceremonies August 6-8. His remains would lie in state at Albany on August 4 and 5. The pamphlet describes the ceremonies, with a laudatory biography of his West Point days, his family life, his military career, his Civil War record, his presidency and "post-bellum honors," and his honorable character.

OCLC 33925101 [2- OH Hist. Soc., Buffalo-Erie Public Library] [as of October 2012].

   (29535)         $350.00

 

121.   Gray, C[hristopher]: A BOOK FOR THE MILLIONS. SLAVERY: OR OPPRESSION AT THE NORTH AS WELL AS THE SOUTH!... PRICE 10 CENTS. Worcester: Printed for the Author, 1862. 3 1/2" x 5 1/2". 24pp, stitched in original printed glossy wrappers. Some spotting, Good+.

 

     A second edition issued, also in 1862. The author says that it's all "very proper" to "inveigh" against Slavery in the South; but equally disturbing is "the wholesale oppression of the laboring classes of the North", and their "weary days of treadmill toil" in manufacturing, while their "lordly employers" make their lives miserable.

Not in LCP, Dumond, Sabin. OCLC records six locations under three accession numbers, as of March 2013.

   (30041)         $125.00

 

122.   Greene, Jonas: THE CROWN WON BUT NOT WORN; OR, M. LOUISE GREENE, A STUDENT OF FIVE YEARS AT KENT'S HILL, ME. Boston: 1868 [wrapper date: 1867]. 162pp, stitched in original printed wrappers. Lightly worn, Very Good.

 

     "A student at the Female College at Kent's Hill, Me.," M. Louise Greene "left that institution in a wretched state of mind," disappeared, until finally "her bleached remains were accidentally discovered in a lonely spot in the forest, in Auburn." The author is her father. He seeks here to rebut the claim, which left her memory in "infamy and disgrace," that she had been caught stealing from other students. Jonas Greene "carefully and candidly investigated this affair with the zeal and scrutiny of a deeply interested father." His conclusion: his daughter "was the victim of prejudice, improper treatment, erroneous or injudicious management, or culpable neglect."

     Mr. Greene's charges, which he sets forth here in detail, did not go unanswered. The Trustees of the Female College responded in a pamphlet entitled, 'Libel Refuted: A Reply to Greene's Pamphlet.' Greene then published a Rejoinder.

Williamson 3896. Sabin 28605. OCLC locates eleven copies, as of June 2012.

    (28966)        $250.00

 

123.   Greenhow, Robert: MEMOIR, HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL, ON THE NORTHWEST COAST OF NORTH AMERICA, AND THE ADJACENT TERRITORIES; ILLUSTRATED BY A MAP AND A GEOGRAPHICAL VIEW OF THOSE COUNTRIES. BY... TRANSLATOR AND LIBRARIAN TO THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE. FEBRUARY 10, 1840. Washington: Blair and Rives, 1840. 26th Cong., 1st Sess. SD174. xi, 228pp, with the folding map. Disbound, Very Good.

 

     "Among contemporary writers on the Oregon Question, and on the events of Oregon history on which that question depended Greenhow should deservedly be mentioned in first place." Eberstadt. "Leading contemporary authority, well documented." Howes.

FIRST EDITION. Howes G389. 114 Eberstadt 340. Graff 1653. Wheat, Transmississippi West 447.

   (29851)         $500.00

 

124.   Grimke, Angelina: APPEAL TO THE CHRISTIAN WOMEN OF THE SOUTH, BY A.E. GRIMKE. [np: 1836]. 36pp, stitched with caption title [as issued]. Lightly toned, rubberstamp at title page. Else Very Good.

 

     Angelina Grimke, from a remarkable South Carolina family, was the "blue-eyed aristocratic daughter of a slaveholder" who "left the slavery-saturated milieu of her native Charleston for the freer humanitarianism of Quaker Philadelphia. A feminist and an abolitionist, she simultaneously rode the two horses of her enthusiasm. The Appeal was her first published work, and her most notorious one. In it she begged the women of the South to fight against Slavery in the name of religion...The Quakers threatened to disown her for entering in such an unwomanly fashion onto the scene of public debate. Postmasters in the South burned the pamphlet. Charleston banned her. The Appeal survives as an outstanding exemplar of anti-slavery literature" [LCP Negro History Exhibition], arguing not only slavery's violation of biblical law but of the Declaration of Independence as well.

     Several printings issued in 1836, the year of first publication. This one states at the end that it is the Third Edition, one of several variant printings. Most were stated printings of the American Anti-Slavery Society; this one is not.

219 NUC 0525060 [3]. See Work 300, Dumond 62,  LCP Negro History Exhibition 84, LCP 4371-4373, Blockson 9187 for other printings.

   (29287)         $875.00

 

125.   Grimke, Sarah M.: AN EPISTLE TO THE CLERGY OF THE SOUTHERN STATES. [New York: 1836]. 20pp, caption title [as issued]. Scattered spotting, Good+, bound in modern cloth.

 

     The elder of the remarkable Grimke sisters, Sarah, a South Carolinian, became an anti-slavery crusader and champion of women's rights. "After an inward struggle" [DAB], she abandoned her Southern roots in this appeal to her "dear native land, to the beloved relatives who are still breathing her tainted air."

     Motivated by "a solemn sense of the duty which I owe as a Southerner to every class of the community of which I was once a part," she denounces the "crime" and "atrocity" of slavery, a sin unmatched "in turpitude...With one hand we clasp the cross of Christ, and with the other grasp the neck of the down-trodden slave!...There is in America a degree of light, knowledge and intelligence which leaves us without excuse before God for upholding the system of slavery." Failure to educate the slaves, or to provide them religious instruction, compounds the sin.

FIRST EDITION. Dumond 62. Blockson 9394. LCP 4384. Sabin28856. Not in Work, Weinstein.

   (30028)         $1,250.00

 

126.   [Guiteau, Sheridan]: CHURCH MUSIC. AN ADDRESS TO PRESBYTERIANS, BY A BALTIMORE PASTOR. Baltimore: S[heridan] Guiteau, Tract Depository, 1857. 16pp. Original printed wrappers [light dust and wear], stitched. Light vertical crease through text, light dusting along top edge of final leaf, a few very small chips to edges. Rear wrap has partial one cent stamp affixed with handwritten address to: "Rev. R. P. Du Bois, New London, Pa." Good+.

 

     A review of this publication in The Presbyterian Magazine states: "The 'Baltimore Pastor' has taken in hand an important subject, and has treated it well... According to the Baltimore Pastor, 'that church music is the best which most moves the hearts of true worshippers while they contemplate the truths expressed in the words sung, and which affords them the easiest and most perfect vehicle for uttering their devout feelings.'" [Rensselaer: THE PRESBYTERIAN MAGAZINE. VOL. VII-1857. March, 1857. Pages 134-136.]

     Sheridan Guiteau [1801-1872] was a Baltimore Presbyterian minister and second cousin, once removed, of Charles J. Guiteau, the assassin of President Garfield. Sheridan's great-grandfather, Francis Guiteau [1690-1760], was Charles' great-great-grandfather. Sheridan became the first pastor of the Franklin Square Presbyterian Church of Baltimore in 1833, and later pastored the First Presbyterian Church of Howard County. He became involved with publishing and printing tracts, and was listed for many years in the Baltimore directories as "Guiteau, Rev. Sheridan, agent for Sunday School and Tract Depository," under the category "Booksellers, Stationers and Publishers." He also served for a time as Secretary of the Maryland branch of the American Tract Society.  [Shepherd: HISTORY OF BALTIMORE, MARYLAND... 1898. Page 357; American Tract Society: TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY...1849. Page 42; Baltimore City Directories for 1853, 1855, and 1863.]

     R.P. Du Bois, to whom this pamphlet was addressed, was Robert P. Du Bois, pastor of the New London, Pennsylvania, Presbyterian Church for forty years.

OCLC 31492809 [6].

   (29390)         $275.00

 

127.   Hall, Edward H.: THE GREAT WEST: RAILROAD, STEAMBOAT, AND STAGE GUIDE AND HAND-BOOK, FOR TRAVELLERS, MINERS, AND EMIGRANTS, TO THE WESTERN, NORTHWESTERN, AND PACIFIC STATES AND TERRITORIES. WITH A MAP OF THE BEST ROUTES TO THE GOLD AND SILVER MINES. New York: D. Appleton and Company., [1866]. Original publisher's cloth [gilt spine lettering dulled]. [8], 181, [1 blank], [9], [1 blank] pp. Folding color 'Map of the Great West,' [from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean]. Ownership inscription of well known 19th century horticulturist and Harvard graduate Henry Winthrop Sargent: "H.W. Sargent, Fishkill on Hudson. Nov. 1869." Very Good plus.

 

     The copyright was entered in 1866; the advertisement for the Holladay Overland Mail and Express Company is dated April 1866, the latest stated date in the book. An 1865 printing has a slightly different title. Advertisements for merchandise useful to the traveler, miner, or emigrant precede the title page, and follow page 181. A descriptions of each State and Territoriy West of the Mississippi is included, with information about rail, steam, and stage routes, tables of distances; a table of contents and list of advertisers are included.

     The book's owner, Henry Winthrop Sargent, was a well-known horticulturist. The Sargent Weeping Hemlock is named after him.

Howes H56. Graff 1726. Wagner-Camp 417 and Streeter Sale 3075 [1865 ed.].

   (30022)         $500.00

 

128.   [Hall, Eunice]: REPORT OF THE TRIAL OF EUNICE HALL VS. ROBERT GRANT, FOR SLANDER. TRIED BEFORE THE COURT OF COMMON PLEASE FOR THE COUNTY OF ESSEX, IN NEW-JERSEY, AND A SPECIAL JURY, IN JUNE TERM, 1821. TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY DANIEL ROGERS, COUNSELLOR AT LAW. WITH AN ABRIDGEMENT OF THE ARGUMENTS OF COUNSEL, AND AN APPENDIX. Elizabeth-Town, N.J.: Printed by J. and E. Sanderson, 1821. 137pp, with original printed wrappers. Unbound, untrimmed, spine wrapper eroded. Light scattered spotting, light toning. Good+.

 

     "Eunice Hall ran one of Elizabethtown's most successful and respected boarding schools for girls. In 1819 a student from the South, Selina Hueston, became sick and died. Robert Grant, a physician also from the South, visited the child during her illness, and stated publicly that Miss Hall's negligence and mental cruelty caused the girl's death." Felcone.

     Hall sued, and the trial "was a major event in Elizabethtown." Id. The jury awarded her $250. This pamphlet reports the trial testimony, closing arguments, and verdict.

Felcone Collection 1258. Cohen 11981.

    (29319)        $375.00

 

129.   Hallett, Benjamin Franklin: SPEECH OF HON. B.F. HALLETT, ON TAKING THE CHAIR AS PRESIDENT OF THE DEMOCRATIC RATIFICATION MEETING AT FANEUIL HALL, OCT. 24, 1855. [Boston: 1855]. Broadside, 5 3/4" x 13 1/2" and printed in two columns. A few old folds, Very Good.

 

      Hallett was a Jacksonian Democrat in his early years-- though he also was a strong advocate for the rights of Indians-- but in the 1850s he became "a 'Doughface' steering by Southern charts" [DAB], a "northern man with southern principles", as such men were frequently called.

     In this rare broadside he calls for Massachusetts to set aside its "miserable, narrow-minded sectional issues," and to end the "outlaw" status which it acquired when it sought to nullify the Fugitive Slave Act. He taunts Free Soil men, asserting that, "Their soil is getting so contracted that there will not be space enough to call it 'free'"; and claims that the Anti-Slavery movement will be "crushed" at the polls.

Not in Sabin, Eberstadt, LCP. OCLC 233646275 [1- AAS] [as of 6/12].    (28920)            $500.00

 

130.   Hamilton, Alexander: LETTER FROM ALEXANDER HAMILTON, CONCERNING THE PUBLIC CONDUCT AND CHARACTER OF JOHN ADAMS, ESQ. PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. [Philadelphia] New -York: Printed for John Lang, by George F. Hopkins. Philadelphia: Re-Printed Pro Bono Publico, 1800. 54, [2 blanks] pp. Disbound, generously margined. Last two leaves present but bound out of order. Very Good, with an attractive ornament at the base of page 54. 

 

     All printings of this pamphlet issued just before, and because of, the impending election of  1800. Howes records four 1800 "almost simultaneous printings" from New York [III Jenkins 965], and this one from Philadelphia. Hamilton says Adams "does not possess the talents adapted to the Administration of Government," and that "there are great and intrinsic defects in his character, which unfit him for the office of Chief Magistrate." Despite Adams's "moral qualifications," Hamilton-- himself jealous of the public affection bestowed upon others-- says Adams has "a vanity without bounds, and a jealousy capable of discoloring every object." He reviews Adams's career, including his diplomatic service, Vice Presidency, and Presidency. Hamilton supports, not his old adversary Thomas Jefferson, but the Federalist Thomas Pinckney of South Carolina.

Howes H116. Ford 70. Evans 37570.    (29065)        $950.00

 

131.   [Hamlin, Hannibal]: ROCKLAND GAZETTE--- EXTRA. TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 9, 1856. ELECTION RETURNS. THE STATE GONE REPUBLICAN BY FROM 15,000 TO 20,000 MAJORITY!! [Rockland: Rockland Gazette, 1856]. Broadside, 6 1/2" x 13 1/2". Printed in two columns, some foxing. Good+.

 

     This broadside Extra presents a town-by-town tally of the 1856 Maine state elections. Its significance is its demonstration of the rise of the new Republican Party, the fall from power of Northern Whigs and Northern Democrats; and the emergence of Hamlin-- Lincoln's first Vice President-- at the Republicans' forefront. Hamlin won the governorship by a substantial margin, and "the Republican candidates for Congress in the six districts are probably elected." John Porter was the Gazette's publisher.

Not located on OCLC or the AAS web site.    (29859)         $500.00

 

132.   [Hammond, Charles]: VIEW OF GENERAL JACKSON'S DOMESTIC RELATIONS, IN REFERENCE TO HIS FITNESS FOR THE PRESIDENCY. [Cincinnati? Washington?: 1828]. 20pp. Caption title, as issued. Disbound, light to moderate foxing, Good+. At head of title: "[From 'Truth's Advocate,' Cincinnati, Ohio, January, 1828.]"

 

     Hammond signs this attack on Andrew Jackson at the bottom of page 14. It is dated at the end from Washington in 1828. An inveterate opponent of Jackson, he evidently originated the 'Coffin Handbills' which accused Jackson of the unjustified execution of the six militia men.

     The subject of this ugly campaign piece is the dubious legality of Jackson's marriage to his beloved Rachel Robards, who probably had never been formally divorced from her first husband. Chapman calls it a "gross adultery." "Every prudent and discreet person, entrusted with the charge of a family holds it a duty to examine well the female character where they cultivate acquaintance. If the female family head be destitute of the characteristics and accomplishments which adorn the station she moves in, it never fails to produce an unfavorable effect..." Chapman tells the story in detail of Rachel's first marriage, her unjustifiable disregard of her nuptial vows, the tenderness of her husband's affections for her, and her alliance with Jackson. The events demonstrate that Rachel was "a convicted and avowed adulteress," and that Jackson is thus unfit for the presidency.   

Wise & Cronin 298. Sabin 99545. AI 33466 [4].   (29453)    $450.00

 

133.   Hawaii: HAWAIIAN ALMANAC AND ANNUAL FOR 1881. A HAND BOOK OF INFORMATION ON MATTERS RELATING TO THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, ORIGINAL AND SELECTED, OF VALUE TO MERCHANTS, PLANTERS, TOURISTS, AND OTHERS. SEVENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. Honolulu: Thos. G. Thrum, Compiler and Publisher, [1880]. Original printed front wrapper, with later plain rear wrapper and later spine; disbound. Else Very Good. 75, [1] pp. 

 

    Essays on Algae of the Hawaiian Islands, Reminiscences of Theatricals in Honolulu, Game Laws and Game of Hawaii, and a Visit to the Crater of Kilauea. Also includes Members of the Royal Order of Kamehameha, a list of sugar plantations, a list of Hawaiian registered vessels, essay on the climate of Hawaii, postal and custom house data, commercial trade regulations, topography, agriculture, resources, and a register and directory of government, private and public institutions.

OCLC 489194938 [1-AAS], 4386034 [74-serial for 1875-1924] [as of 8/12].    (29153)     $350.00

 

134.   Hellenbroek, A[braham]: SPECIMEN OF DIVINE TRUTHS, FITTED FOR THE USE OF THOSE, OF VARIOUS CAPACITIES, WHO DESIRE TO PREPARE THEMSELVES FOR A DUE CONFESSION OF THEIR FAITH. TRANSLATED FROM THE DUTCH, FOR THE USE OF THE REFORMED PROTESTANT DUTCH CHURCH IN THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. New York: Printed by W. Durell, 1791. viii, [9]-95, [1 blank] pp. Stitched and disbound. Lightly foxed and worn. Good+.

 

     The first American printing issued from New York in 1765. Hellenbroek was a Dutch Reformed Minister who died in 1731.

Evans 23438. NAIP w036492 [5].   (29150)  $275.00

 

135.   Hening, William Waller: THE NEW VIRGINIA JUSTICE, COMPRISING THE OFFICE AND AUTHORITY OF A JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, IN THE COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA. TOGETHER WITH A VARIETY OF USEFUL PRECEDENTS ADOPTED [sic] TO THE LAWS NOW IN FORCE. TO WHICH IS ADDED, AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING ALL THE MOST APPROVED FORMS OF CONVEYANCING...ALSO THE DUTIES OF A JUSTICE OF THE PEACE ARISING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES. Richmond: Printed by T. Nicolson, 1795. Attractive original sheep [front hinge just starting] with gilt-lettered red morocco spine lettering. [36], 456, [12], xxiv, 32 pp [as issued]. Very Good plus.

 

     Hening "worked tirelessly at legal compilations which were contemporaneously important and have proved often invaluable historically...His name [is] revered by Virginia lawyers and antiquarians." DAB. The first nineteen pages are filled with the names of Subscribers, an obvious vote of confidence from the Virginia Bar. It went through numerous editions, of which this is the first.

     The work is exceedingly thorough. Hening says that it contains, "not only more useful information on the same subjects, but a greater variety of precedents, besides several additional titles, unnoticed in any other book of the kind hitherto published either in Great Britain or America."  An excellent early legal treatise.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 28823. Haynes 8223. Cohen 8475.

   (29835)         $1,250.00

 

136.   Hibbard, George B.: LAND DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION FOR SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. GEORGE B. HIBBARD, LATE MAJOR U.S. VOLUNTEERS, SUPERINTENDENT OF IMMIGRATION. [New York: 1873]. 16pp, stitched, original printed wrappers. The rear wrapper includes an engraving of the 'Colonist's Reception House.' Text clean. Wrappers lightly spotted and separated from text block, else Very Good.

 

     This pamphlet explains in detail the wonderful opportunity for veterans to make a fresh start in the West. The Railroad has lands available to soldiers and sailors, pursuant to Congress's 1872 Soldiers' Homestead Law, "within twenty miles on each side of the road in the States, and within forty miles on each side in the Territories." The line of the Railroad begins at Duluth, traverses Minnesota and Dakota to the Missouri River, the Yellowstone Valley in Montana, the Rocky Mountains, and terminates at Puget Sound. This booklet touts the agricultural advantages of Minnesota, Montana, Dakota, and Idaho; the great mining districts and grazing lands along the route; and "vast forests of valuable timber" in the far West.

     The pamphlet explains and prints the Soldiers' Homestead Law of 1872, describes the Company's procedures to make settlement as convenient as possible, and recommends that "Settlers will find it to their advantage to go in groups or colonies. Fifty or one hundred persons combining may secure, on favorable terms, all the land held by the Railroad Company in a township."       

Bureau of Railway Economics, page 242. OCLC 10990455 [7].

   (29301)         $275.00

 

137.   [Hicks, Albert W.]: THE LIFE, TRIAL, CONFESSION AND EXECUTION OF ALBERT W. HICKS, THE PIRATE AND MURDERER, EXECUTED ON BEDLOE'S ISLAND, NEW YORK BAY, ON THE 13TH OF JULY, 1860, FOR THE MURDER OF CAPT. BURR, SMITH AND OLIVER WATTS, ON BOARD THE OYSTER SLOOP E.A. JOHNSON. CONTAINING THE HISTORY OF HIS LIFE (WRITTEN BY HIMSELF) FROM CHILDHOOD...WITH A FULL ACCOUNT OF HIS PIRACIES, MURDERS, MUTINIES. New York: Robert M. De Witt, [1860]. 84pp, double page frontis. Two unnumbered leaves of illustrations between pages 12 and 13, 28 and 29, 44 and 45. Bound in modern wrappers [lacking the printed wrappers], else Very Good.

 

     "Hicks was a triple murderer, but only technically a pirate. He was a member of the crew of the oyster sloop, and he chopped up the captain and two crew members in lower New York Bay, but being in the ebb and flow of the tide, it was technically a crime on the high seas and a federal offence. The little money he took got him to Providence, where he was caught. His execution in New York Harbor, in the sight of hundreds of vessels, was in the best maritime tradition." McDade.

McDade 473. Cohen 12692. Sabin 31709.   (28921) $450.00

 

138.   Hopkins, Samuel: THE IMPORTANCE AND NECESSITY OF CHRISTIANS CONSIDERING JESUS CHRIST IN THE EXTENT OF HIS HIGH AND GLORIOUS CHARACTER. A SERMON PREACHED AT THE SOUTH CHURCH IN BOSTON. Boston: N.E.: Printed and Sold by Kneeland and Adams, 1768. 35, [1 blank] pp, with the half title. Disbound. Toned and some foxing, Good+. Contemporary ownership signature of Joseph Eckley.

 

     Hopkins, minister of a church in Great Barrington, inveighs against "those who expressly deny the Divinity of Christ, and represent him as no more than a meer creature!" Hopkins created the branch of Calvinism known as Hopkinsianism, also known as the New Divinity.

Evans 10928.   (29211)           $350.00

 

139.   Hubbard, William: A NARRATIVE OF THE INDIAN WARS IN NEW ENGLAND, FROM THE FIRST PLANTING THEREOF, IN THE YEAR 1607, TO THE YEAR 1677. CONTAINING A RELATION OF THE OCCASION, RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE WAR WITH THE INDIANS, IN THE SOUTHERN, WESTERN, EASTERN AND NORTHERN PARTS OF SAID COUNTRY. Boston: Printed and Sold by John Boyle in Marlborough Street..., 1775. 12mo. viii, [9]-288 pp. Page 206 is misnumbered '209', as issued. Some spotting in upper portion, toned, lacking the rear free endpaper. Text complete and bound in contemporary calf, which is moderately worn [spinehead chipped, front hinge starting]. Some early writing on the pastedowns. Good to Good+.

 

     This second American edition is preceded only by the 1677 Boston printing. The last page includes an advertisement for books sold by the printer. "A corner-stone authority on the subject" [Howes]. "This is Hubbard's best work," containing "a detailed history of the so-called King Philip's war" [Larned].

     The Preface, dated just a month after the Battle of Lexington, describes the valiant, undermanned colonists who overcame the powerful Indians. It notes that "we of this province . . . have been called to defend our lives and properties against the incursions of more distant savages." Reverend William Hubbard "was the minister of Ipswich, Mass., where he died September 14th, 1704, aged eighty-three. He was remarkable in an age and country of bigots, for his liberality, moderation, and piety. His narrative has been regarded for two hundred years by historians as a standard of authority" [Field].

Howes H756. Evans 14120. Larned 956 [1865 printing]. Field 731 [1677 edition].

   (29559)         $2,000.00

 

140.   [Huntington, Joseph]: LETTERS OF FRIENDSHIP TO THOSE CLERGYMEN WHO HAVE LATELY RENOUNCED COMMUNION WITH THE MINISTERS AND CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN GENERAL, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND RECENT EXAMPLES. Hartford: Hudson and Goodwin, 1780. 134pp. Disbound, lacking the final blank. Fore-edge trimmed closely with final letters of several leaves shaved. Else Good+, with the contemporary signature of David Parsons.

 

     The author discusses the doctrines of Robert Sandeman in detail. He then reviews the case of John Fisk, who had been a military officer and was now school teacher in Stockbridge, and the Widow Deane, whom he wooed and won. Widow Deane's church warned her not to marry Fisk, whom it deemed an immoral character, primarily because of his barnyard [or military camp] language. Remorseful, Fisk sought pardon; nevertheless the church was unswayed by his purported repentance. The widow Deane went ahead and married him anyway-- she was promptly excommunicated at Stockbridge. Stephen West wrote a pamphlet in Vindication of the excommunication. Huntington disagrees, saying the Church and Council seek "to debar mankind from the plain, common right they have of chusing those companions which they like best, and which they judge will be the greatest blessings and comforts to them."   

FIRST EDITION. Evans 16804. Trumbull 888.

   (29118)         $275.00

 

141.   Hyatt, Thaddeus: THE PRAYER OF THADDEUS HYATT TO JAMES BUCHANAN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, IN BEHALF OF KANSAS, ASKING FOR A POSTPONEMENT OF ALL THE LAND SALES IN THAT TERRITORY, AND FOR OTHER RELIEF; TOGETHER WITH CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER DOCUMENTS SETTING FORTH ITS DEPLORABLE DESTITUTION FROM THE DROUGHT AND FAMINE. SUBMITTED UNDER OATH, OCTOBER 29, 1860. Washington: Henry Polkinhorn, Printer, 1860. 68, [4] pp. Disbound, else Very Good.

 

     Hyatt was head of the National Kansas Committee, an organization founded to encourage emigration to Kansas by anti-slavery men and to assist them after they arrived. He "became alarmed at the conditions in Kansas Territory during the drought of 1859-60 and came to Kansas to see things for himself" [Dary]. After gathering the necessary information, he went to Washington, published this pamphlet, and sought help. "This work contains his plea for help along with settlers' accounts, crop reports, rainfall records and his account titled 'Diary of Twenty-five Days Journeying Through the Famine Land.' There are individual sketches detailing conditions" in the affected counties" [Id.]. Hyatt says the only solution to the emergency is to remove all government lands from the market, especially those in the New York Indian reserve.

Dary 86. 103 Eberstadt 150.   (29776)           $450.00

 

142.   Illinois Republican State Central Committee: POLITICAL RECORD OF STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS ON THE SLAVERY QUESTION. A TRACT ISSUED BY THE ILLINOIS REPUBLICAN STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. CONTENTS. PART I., ANTI-SLAVERY. PART II., PRO-SLAVERY. PART III., MISCELLANEOUS. [Springfield?: 1860]. 16pp, disbound [inner margin a trifle rough]. Lightly foxed, Good+. Printed in two columns per page.

 

     This Illinois campaign document which, with slight variations, was reprinted several times in 1860, attacks Douglas for hypocrisy on the question of Congressional power to control slavery in the Territories; it paints him as an extreme Southern Rights advocate, supporting the Dred Scott Decision and scuttling the Missouri Compromise. In his early public career, Douglas had extolled the immutable nature of the 1820 Missouri Compromise, and insisted that Congress had full power over the Territories. But in 1854, leading the Kansas-Nebraska Act forces and advocating Popular Sovereignty, he changed horses: only a Territory's inhabitants could decide whether to bar slavery within its borders. His attempt to reconcile the Dred Scott Decision with Popular Sovereignty, and his unconcern with slavery as a social and moral question, are mocked and scorned.

FIRST EDITION. LCP 8794. Sabin 20696n. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Miles, Ante-Fire Imprints.

   (29124)         $650.00

 

143.   [Jackson, Andrew]: THE CASE OF THE SIX MUTINEERS, WHOSE CONVICTION AND SENTENCE WERE APPROVED OF BY GENERAL JACKSON, FAIRLY STATED: WITH A REFUTATION OF SOME OF THE FALSEHOODS CIRCULATED ON THIS SUBJECT. Albany: Printed for the Albany Argus, by Webster & Wood, 1828. 32pp, stitched into modern plain wrappers. Browned, scattered spotting, light blindstamp, ownership signature. Good+.

 

     This is one of three 1828 issues, all scarce, printed in the heated presidential race of that year. The other two were also printed in New York State: Albany and Geneva. Anti-Jackson forces had charged that his unrestrained, martial personality-- featured in a pamphlet, 'Official Record from the War Department,' which highlighted his execution of the six militia men after the Battle of New Orleans-- unfitted him for the presidency. New York Democrats [then called Democratic-Republicans, or Republicans] defend Jackson here, denounce the falsehoods surrounding that incident, and call the 'Official Record' "useless rubbish."

Howes J4. Wise & Cronin 232. Sabin 56778. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Miles.    (29886)   $650.00

 

144.   [Jackson, Andrew]: OFFICIAL RECORD FROM THE WAR DEPARTMENT, OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE COURT MARTIAL WHICH TRIED, AND THE ORDERS OF GENERAL JACKSON FOR SHOOTING THE SIX MILITIA MEN, TOGETHER WITH OFFICIAL LETTERS FROM THE WAR DEPARTMENT, SHOWING THAT THESE AMERICAN CITIZENS WERE INHUMANLY & ILLEGALLY MASSACRED. Albany: 1828. 47, [1 blank] pp. Stitched into modern plain wrappers. Light foxing, several blank margin repairs, faint blindstamp. Good+.

 

     The primary weapon of the anti-Jackson forces was his alleged impetuous, unrestrained, martial personality, utterly unsuitable for the presidency of a democratic republic whose success required respect for constitutional checks and balances. Jackson's indefensible shooting of the six militia men after the Battle of New Orleans is described in elaborate detail. The events described occurred during the Seminole Campaign of 1815. Jackson ordered the execution of six soldiers for mutiny. The alleged mutiny consisted of a dispute over whether the soldiers were volunteers for three or six months.

Howes J11. Wise & Cronin 512. Sabin 56778. AI 36681. Not in Miles, Eberstadt, Decker.

   (29887)         $650.00

 

145.   Jackson, James C.: FEMALE DISEASES AND THE CAUSTIC-BURNERS. Dansville, Livingston County, N.Y.: F. Wilson Hurd & Co., Publishers, 1859. 17, [3] pp. Stitched. Title page dusted, else Very Good.

 

     Dr. Jackson was physician-in-chief at Our Home, the short name for 'Our Home Hygienic Institute' at Dansville, Livingston County, New York. It was a Spa, founded on the site of a mineral water spring, in 1855. Jackson helped to make it one of the most popular such in the world. It was renamed 'Our Home on the Hillside,' served primarily a vegetarian diet, and banned tobacco and alcohol. Here Dr. Jackson inveighs against "the caustic practice," which, instead of curing "female disease," is "horrid and barbarous" and has caused untold misery to many women.

     In 1863 Dr. Jackson invented the first breakfast cereal.

OCLC 37452574 [1- Rochester Med. Ctr.] [as of March 2013].   (29997)    $375.00

 

146.   [Jackson, Jonathan]: THOUGHTS UPON THE POLITICAL SITUATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, IN WHICH THAT OF MASSACHUSETTS IS MORE PARTICULARLY CONSIDERED. WITH SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE CONSTITUTION FOR A FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. ADDRESSED TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNION. BY A NATIVE OF BOSTON. Worcester, Massachusetts: Isaiah Thomas, 1788. 209, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, light foxing, some spotting, Good+.

 

     Jackson examines the Colonies' transition from subordination to independence. England's "avaricious, unfeeling disposition, towards those who had sprang from them, and were willing still to continue by their side," led it "to such acts and declarations, as gave a just alarm to every independent American; and forced each one of them, who reasoned at all, to decide, whether he would submit unconditionally to the impositions of Great Britain, or risque the issue by the best opposition in his power." A capable and enterprising people, separated from European quarrels, Americans must create a government that will bring peace "among themselves" and "secure them against any attacks from without."

     Though he concedes that the proposed Constitution is not without flaws, Jackson vigorously defends it in detail, rebutting anti-Federalist arguments. "We have tried our separate sovereignties long enough to see, to feel, that they are puny governments only, while not cemented by one common interest-- while not assisted by some higher authority, established equally by all, and common to all."

FIRST EDITION. Howes J23. Evans 21173. Streeter Sale 1051. Not in Church, Larned.

   (29082)         $1,750.00

 

147.   [Jackson, W. Arthur]: A HISTORY OF THE TRIAL OF CASTNER HANWAY AND OTHERS, FOR TREASON, AT PHILADELPHIA IN NOVEMBER, 1851. WITH AN INTRODUCTION UPON THE HISTORY OF THE SLAVE QUESTION. BY A MEMBER OF THE PHILADELPHIA BAR. Philadelphia: Uriah Hunt & Sons, 1852. 86pp. Bound in modern stiff paper wrappers with title label on front cover. Very Good.

 

     When Edward Gorsuch, a Maryland slave owner acting under a federal warrant, attempted to seize fugitive slaves near Christiana, Pennsylvania, he was met with a volley of gunfire and a pitched battle in which several people, including Gorsuch, were killed. President Fillmore, cheered on by the Governor of Maryland, sought to make an example of those who would resist execution of the Fugitive Slave Act: Castner Hanway and others were indicted for treason and put on trial in Philadelphia.

     Jackson, a lawyer for defendants, wrote this pamphlet to expose "the most glaring absurdities and incongruities contained in" Maryland Attorney General Robert Brent's pamphlet on the trial. Brent lamented the verdict of acquittal and blamed a biased jury and judge [Supreme Court Justice Robert Grier presided]. Jackson decries "the almost scurrilous terms" in which Brent "denounces the majority of the citizens of Philadelphia, the people of Pennsylvania, the officers of the Court in which the trials were held, the Judges who presided, and, in short, every one connected with the case, except counsel and witnesses for the prosecution."  Jackson's work is "a very useful summary of the case and the strategy of the defense. Although partisan in the testimony Jackson chose to reproduce, the pamphlet nevertheless shows the weakness of the prosecution's case. It is also an important source for information about events involving fugitive slaves in Lancaster County before the Christiana incident and for events after Hanway's acquittal." Finkelman.

FIRST EDITION. Finkelman 101-102. Cohen 14182. Blockson 9529. LCP 4563. Dumond 66. Not in Work or Harv. Law Cat.   (27719)        $1,250.00

 

148.   [Jacob, Giles]: EVERY MAN HIS OWN LAWYER: OR, A SUMMARY OF THE LAWS OF ENGLAND, IN A NEW AND INSTRUCTIVE METHOD, UNDER THE FOLLOWING HEADS...ALL OF THEM SO PLAINLY TREATED OF, THAT ALL MANNER OF PERSONS MAY BE PARTICULARLY AQUAINTED [!] WITH OUR LAWS AND STATUTES, CONCERNING CIVIL AND CRIMINAL AFFAIRS, AND KNOW HOW TO DEFEND THEMSELVES AND THEIR ESTATES AND FORTUNES, IN ALL CASES WHATSOEVER. New York: Hugh Gaine, 1768. pp iv, 289, [13] [as issued]. Original calf, rebacked. Several gatherings toned and spotted, else Very Good. With the ownership inscription, "David Gelston's [?] Book | May 24th 1771."

 

     This first American edition, from the seventh London edition, is considered the first layman's self-help law guide printed in America. Jacob calls his book "an instructive treatise, writ in the easiest method, and adapted to every capacity, whereby the unskilful, and those who are ignorant in the practice of the law, may in some measure be their own advisers, and readily avoid the common errors too often happening in the prosecution of suits." It "has been revised and corrected, and many valuable additions inserted."

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. Evans 10935. I Harv. Law Cat. 1035. Marke 248. Marvin 300 [8th London, 1787].   (29839)            $2,500.00

 

149.   Jacob, Giles: A NEW LAW-DICTIONARY: CONTAINING, THE INTERPRETATION AND DEFINITION OF WORDS AND TERMS USED IN THE LAW; AND ALSO THE WHOLE LAW, AND THE PRACTICE THEREOF, UNDER ALL THE HEADS AND TITLES OF THE SAME. TOGETHER WITH SUCH INFORMATIONS RELATING THERETO, AS EXPLAIN THE HISTORY AND ANTIQUITY OF THE LAW, AND OUR MANNERS, CUSTOMS, AND ORIGINAL GOVERNMENT. ABSTRACTED FROM ALL DICTIONARIES, ABRIDGEMENTS, INSTITUTES, REPORTS, YEAR-BOOKS, CHARTERS, REGISTERS, CHRONICLES, AND HISTORIES, PUBLISHED TO THIS TIME. AND FITTED FOR THE USE OF BARRISTERS, STUDENTS AND PRACTISERS OF THE LAW, MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT, AND OTHER GENTLEMEN, JUSTICES OF PEACE, CLERGYMEN, &C. In the Savoy [London]: Printed by E. and R. Nutt, and R. Gosling [Assigns of E. Sayer, Esq;] for J. and J. Knapton, J. Darby, A. Bettesworth, F. Fayram, W. Bears, J. Pemberton, J. Osborn and T. Longman, C. Rivington, F. Clay, J. Batley, and A. Ward. , 1729. Folio, 8.5" x 12.5". [4], 4, [764] pp, printed in double columns. Original tooled calf [rubbed], rebacked. Text with light age toning, old repairs to blank endpapers. Early ownership signatures of Walter Noble dated 1731 on first page of text; signatures of Jos. Robinson dated Lichfield 1758, and James Ritchie on front endpapers. Very Good.

 

     Giles Jacob [1686-1744] was a compiler of law books and other miscellaneous writings. He worked on his NEW LAW-DICTIONARY for nine years and published this first edition in 1729. It went on to become his most famous work, reaching its twelfth edition by 1800. Cowley stated that this was "Jacob's masterpiece and constituted an entirely new departure in legal literature." Giles's Preface explains that "my Scheme is very different from the other Law-Dictionaries." His work "contains the Derivations and Definitions of Words and Terms used in the Law, and likewise the whole Law, with the Practice thereof, extracted from all other Books in an early concise Method, for the Universal Use of all Barristers, Students, and Practicers of the Law..."

FIRST EDITION. II Harv. Law Cat. 1036. Cowley: A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ABRIDGEMENTS, DIGESTS, DICTIONARIES AND INDEXES OF ENGLISH LAW TO THE YEAR 1800, pages xc-xci.

   (29148)         $2,500.00

 

150.   [Jarvis, Russell]: FACTS AND ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE ELECTION OF GENERAL CASS, RESPECTFULLY ADDRESSED TO THE WHIGS AND DEMOCRATS OF ALL THE FREE STATES. BY AN ANTI-ABOLITIONIST. [New York: 1848]. 64pp. Disbound without wrappers [the front wrapper has the imprint]. Else Very Good.

 

     Jarvis-- assuring his readers that "I am not an abolitionist"-- argues "against the extension of slavery over the present or future territories of the United States, and over the new States which may rise in them." An early advocate of what would become the Republican Platform, he claims that, "A government established for the protection of human rights must not be perverted to hewing them down." Jarvis demonstrates-- from the Declaration of Independence to other decisions of the early Continental Congress-- that the Nation's original intention was to halt the spread of slavery. The "curse" of slavery had been fastened on the colonies by England, not by the will of the colonists.Congress's early policies, and those of the States, are examined to demonstrate that slavery was deemed a wrong which ought to be confined as much as possible.

     Cass's policy on slavery was utterly unacceptable to Jarvis. Cass was the first to advocate Popular Sovereignty in the Territories: territorial residents would decide for themselves whether to permit slavery within their borders. Cass was "an astute and calculating political opportunist. The free-soilers already hated him...and he needed to retrieve his position among the northern Democrats. On first reaction, he had favored the Wilmot Proviso [outlawing slavery in the Territories], but later he perceived its explosive nature, and in December 1847 he entered the campaign with his Nicholson letter, in which he put forward the doctrine of popular sovereignty." Potter, The Impending Crisis 70-71.

Sabin 35810.   (28879)            $250.00

 

151.   [Johnson, Andrew]: THE GREAT IMPEACHMENT AND TRIAL OF ANDREW JOHNSON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. WITH THE WHOLE OF THE PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, AND IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES. TOGETHER WITH THE ELEVEN ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT, AND THE WHOLE OF THE PROCEEDINGS IN THE COURT OF IMPEACHMENT, WITH THE VERBATIM EVIDENCE OF ALL THE WITNESSES...WITH THE DECISIONS OF CHIEF JUSTICE CHASE, AND THE VERDICT OF THE COURT. Philadelphia: T.B. Peterson & Brothers, [1868]. Original printed salmon front wrapper [bit of edge wear], illustrated with a portrait of Johnson. Stitched, untrimmed, partly uncut. [9]- 290, [6 publ. advts.] pp, as issued. Full-page portraits of the major participants in the proceedings. Each text page printed in two columns. "Price 50 Cents." About Very Good.

 

     A thorough record of these proceedings, with a detailed Table of Contents, and an introductory overview and summary, including an explanation of the Founders' views on impeachment. This work was clearly intended for distribution to ordinary readers rather than lawyers, other upper-class people, or politicians.

Marke 1016.   (29053)            $450.00

 

152.   [Johnson, Reverdy]: REMARKS ON POPULAR SOVEREIGNTY, AS MAINTAINED AND DENIED RESPECTIVELY BY JUDGE DOUGLAS, AND ATTORNEY-GENERAL BLACK. BY A SOUTHERN CITIZEN. Baltimore: Murphy & Co., 1859. 40pp, disbound and lightly foxed, Good+.

 

     Johnson was an authoritative voice on the issue of Popular Sovereignty: he was counsel for the slaveowners in the Dred Scott case, which held that Congress could not bar slavery from the territories. Douglas's opponents immediately noted that the decision destroyed the underpinnings of Popular Sovereignty. Douglas sought to counter Dred Scott by arguing that slavery's viability in a given location depended upon friendly local legislation. A territorial legislature could, as a practical matter, bar slavery by simply refusing to enact such laws; but Southern Rights proponents insisted that territories had a duty to do so.

     Here Johnson weighed in, against Southern Rights advocates and in support of Douglas on the eve of his presidential candidacy. He makes a 'natural rights' argument that, although Congress lacks power to prohibit or establish slavery in a territory, a territorial legislature may do so. "That slavery, an artificial instead of a natural condition, should be beyond the reach of human power, under any form of government...in disregard of the wishes of all branches of the government, and of all general or local power, is a doctrine so extraordinary that it almost defies human judgment."

Howes J143. Sabin 36266, and after 69421. LCP Afro-Am 5337.

   (28942)         $250.00

 

153.   Johnson, Reverdy: SPEECH OF THE HON. REVERDY JOHNSON, OF MARYLAND, DELIVERED BEFORE THE POLITICAL FRIENDS OF HON. STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS, AT A MEETING IN FANEUIL HALL, BOSTON, ON THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 1860. TO WHICH IS ADDED THE LETTER OF THE HON. REVERDY JOHNSON, TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE DOUGLAS MEETING IN NEW YORK ON THE 22D OF MAY, 1860. Baltimore: John Murphy, 1860. 16pp, disbound and lightly foxed. Good+.

 

     Johnson, a Maryland pro-slavery Democratic Unionist, carried enormous authority on the divisive issue of slavery in the territories: he had argued the winning side of the Dred Scott Case. Here, supporting the presidential candidacy of Douglas, he explains that Dred Scott did not bar a territorial legislature from prohibiting slavery in its territory. This is one of two printings by Murphy, without the statement of "$10 per 1000" on page 16. 

     Douglas had insisted that, as leader of the Northern Democrats, he had earned the right to the 1860 nomination by stepping aside in 1856 for the sake of party unity. But Southern fire-eaters bolted the 1860 Charleston Convention, which adjourned to Baltimore to finish up its business. Johnson's speech came after the Charleston disruption but before the Baltimore resumption. A formidable opponent of Yancey and his separatist coalition, Johnson gives an important speech supporting the national Democratic Party, the sole remaining national political institution in 1860, and explaining the Dred Scott decision.

LCP 5340. Not in Cohen.

   (29421)         $250.00

 

154.   Johnson, T.W.: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF TEMPERANCE REFORM; WITH HISTORICAL FACTS, AND INTERESTING EXTRACTS FROM TEMPERANCE ADDRESSES; THRILLING EXPERIENCES OF REFORMED INEBRIATES, TEMPERANCE RESOLUTIONS, &C. ALSO, A CONDENSED HISTORY OF THE CAUSES AND EVENTS OF THE IRISH REBELLION OF '98; BIOGRAPHICAL EXTRACTS OF EMINENT IRISH PATRIOTS, MARTYRS TO IRISH EMANCIPATION...DANGEROUS TENDENCIES OF PARTY SPIRIT IN THE UNITED STATES. Glen's Falls: M. & T.J. Strong, 1845. 56pp, disbound, lightly toned, Good+.

 

     The book shows "the rapid and astonishing advace [sic] of Temperance principles, with their glorious results of elevating and ameliorating the condition of our race," and seeks "to awaken a new and more permanent zeal in the friends of the enterprize in pushing on the work of reform; and by exposing the awful consequences of intemperance..." A parade of horribles is presented, along with stirring stories of reform and a passionate denunciation of England for its treatment of the Irish.

Sabin 36331. AI 45-3586 [3]. OCLC records only eight copies, under several accession numbers, as of February 2013.

   (29798)         $275.00

 

155.   Johnson, W. Bishop: THE SCOURGING OF A RACE, AND OTHER SERMONS AND ADDRESSES BY...PASTOR OF THE SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH OF WASHINGTON, D.C.; EDITOR OF THE NATIONAL BAPTIST MAGAZINE. City of Washington: Beresford, Printer, 1904. Original publisher's brown cloth, with gilt-stamped spine title. Portrait frontis, with tissue guard, of Reverend Johnson, viii, 228 pp. Tissue guard has a few fox marks, else a Fine copy.

 

     "Washington minister William Bishop Johnson was a leader in the politicization of the Baptist church, the largest single denomination of African Americans." He was a founder of the "American Baptist National Convention, an independent organization of black churches formed after long-standing difficulties with white Baptists. In 1895 it would become the National Baptist Convention, the largest Afro-American organization in the United States." Foner & Branham, LIFT EVERY VOICE: AFRICAN AMERICAN ORATORY, 1787-1900, pages  708-709.

     Johnson was an outspoken militant, especially for his day. He delivered one of these printed Addresses in Boston at the dedication ceremonies of the monument to Robert G. Shaw of the 54th Massachusetts. This book also includes his famous sermon, National Perils, delivered in October 1889. It denounces unequivocally the injustice of American racism, and boldly predicts that, in twenty years, "what we call the patient, humble Negro will have gone and a countless army of strong men, who know their rights and will contend for them, will have taken their place...Our people must, in the mean time, geet property, buy land, own houses and lots in the south and west, and then prepare themselves to stay on that land if every inch must be converted into a fort with Winchester and Gatling guns to keep off the wildcats and crows." 

Not in LCP, Blockson, Work, or Bryan. OCLC records a number of institutional locations.

   (29989)         $450.00

 

156.   Johnston, William F.: MESSAGE OF GOVERNOR JOHNSTON IN DEFENCE OF PENNSYLVANIA. Philadelphia: Crissy & Markley, Printers, 1850. 32pp. Title page vignette. Disbound and lightly worn, else Very Good.

 

     Governor Johnston rebuts Resolutions of Georgia and Virginia, which asserted that the Northern States, including Pennsylvania, had violated the Constitution on matters "connected with the slavery of the colored race." Johnston demonstrates that, at the time of the Constitution's adoption, it was the Founders' intention "to prevent the extension and increase of human slavery; and at an early period to secure its entire abolition in the several States." The Constitution's references to the Three Fifths Clause "and the delivery of fugitives were concessions made to the people of the slaveholding States." In our National Government of limited powers, no power is granted "to plant the institution of slavery where it does not exist; and certainly none to guarantee to it, in its new home, the unequal and anti-republican representation to which it is entitled in the original States."

     Moreover, Pennsylvania had made clear its anti-slavery views before the Constitution's adoption. Its statutes of 1780 and 1788 emancipated its slaves, and expressed "an abhorrence of that condition of civil bondage to which the arms and tyranny of Great Britain were exerted to reduce us." He attaches in full the Emancipation Statutes of 1780 and 1788. But he demonstrates Pennsylvania's faithful adherence to the Constitutional Compromises, especially the Fugitive Slave Acts. All the Acts and Resolutions of Pennsylvania relating to Slavery are attached.

LCP 7548. OCLC 930979 [6- as of 6/12].

   (29012)         $350.00

 

157.   [Junius] [pseud.]: A STATEMENT OF REASONS AGAINST THE ASSUMPTION AND EXERCISE OF EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE POWERS BY THE SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT: WITH REMARKS INTENDED TO PROVE THAT THERE IS NO LAW IN THIS STATE, CLOTHED WITH THE AUTHORITY OF THE CONSTITUTION, AGAINST THE SALE OF SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS; AND THE IMPOSSIBILITY OF SUPPRESSING THE SALE BY PENAL LAWS, WITHOUT TRANSCENDING THE POWERS, AND INVADING THE SACRED RIGHTS OF PROPERTY, WHICH ARE ESTABLISHED AND GUARANTIED BY THE CONSTITUTION OF MASSACHUSETTS. Boston: William Chadwick, Printer, 1849. Original printed brown wrappers [entitled, 'Ex Post Facto Laws by Judicial Legislation!!'], stitched. 40pp. Light wear, Very Good. Presentation inscription on front wrapper to Whiting Griswold, and addressed to him on plain rear wrapper. Griswold was from Greenfield, Massachusetts, active in public affairs, would become active in the Republican Party, and was a Republican elector in the 1864 elections.

 

     The Statement is an impassioned protest against the "usurpation of power" by the Massachusetts Supreme Court which, the author claims, affirmed the conviction of a man for selling liquor in violation of a statute which had been repealed. "Where is the authority to be found which gives the Supreme Court the power to REVIVE and clothe with constitutional authority, a repealed law?" The Court had reasoned that the "repeal by implication" of a law revived its predecessor statute. Junius expresses his outrage.     

Cohen 9738. Sabin 36921. OCLC 46326401 [2- Yale, Newberry] [as of March 2013].

   (30032)         $350.00

 

158.   Keene, Richard Raynal: A LETTER FROM RICHARD RAYNAL KEENE, TO LUTHER MARTIN, ESQ. ATTORNEY-GENERAL OF MARYLAND; UPON THE SUBJECT OF HIS 'MODERN GRATITUDE.'. Baltimore: Prentiss & Cole. June-, 1802. 53pp, untrimmed and partly uncut, disbound, lightly tanned and foxed. Good+.

 

     Luther Martin was Maryland's first Attorney General, a member of the Continental Congress and the 1787 Constitutional Convention, and a leading lawyer. His private life was not so successful: "as a student in the law office of the eminent and redoubtable Luther Martin, he fell in love with Eleanor Martin and against the fierce opposition of her father married her on January 28, 1802. Keene's reply [this item] distinctly scored upon his father-in-law and makes good reading to this day" [Streeter].     

FIRST EDITION. Streeter, Texas 1056A note. 162 Eberstadt 455. AI 2481 [4]. Bristol [MD] 114.    (19576)            $500.00

 

159.   [Kemble, Frances; Judge George Washington Woodward; Bishop John Henry Hopkins]: THE VIEWS OF JUDGE WOODWARD AND BISHOP HOPKINS ON NEGRO SLAVERY AT THE SOUTH, ILLUSTRATED FROM THE JOURNAL OF A RESIDENCE ON A GEORGIAN PLANTATION BY MRS. FRANCES ANNE KEMBLE, (LATE BUTLER.). [Philadelphia?: 1863?]. 32pp. Stitched in original printed wrappers. Front wrapper with picture of a Negro slave with whipping stripes on his bare back. The inner wrappers summarize George Stroud's works on the legal horrors of slavery. Very Good plus.

 

     The pamphlet was probably issued by the Republican Party in Pennsylvania, or an organization closely affiliated with it, to demonstrate the pro-slavery character of the Pennsylvania Democratic organization.

     Judge Woodward, the Democrats' candidate for Governor in 1863, considered slavery "divinely sanctioned, if not ordained." Like George McClellan, he favored a negotiated peace with the Confederacy. John Henry Hopkins, the first Protestant Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of Vermont, made the serious faux pas of arguing, after issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation, that slavery was sanctioned by holy scripture and hence was not a sin. His outraged and embarrassed co-religionists sought to disown him. The abolitionist Fanny Kemble was married to the slaveholder Pierce Butler during the years recounted by her famous Journal. She describes in detail the loathsome character of  the slave system which Woodward and Hopkins justify.

LCP 5518. Blockson 10186. Bartlett 5960. OCLC 752908295 [1- British Library] [as of October 2012; many facsimiles noted].

   (29514)         $500.00

 

160.   [King, William R.; C.C. Clay, et al.]: TO THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICAN PARTY OF ALABAMA. [np: 1840]. 6, [2 blanks] pp. Disbound, some spotting, last blank [which has an address for mailing] is chipped. Good or so.

 

     Ellison calls this plea for the defeat of the Whigs in the 1840 elections an Alabama imprint.  King [who later would serve briefly as Franklin Pierce's Vice President], Clay, and other Jacksonians assert that Harrison and his fellow Whigs "are true to their old principles: That ours is a Government not of equality, but of privilege; and that under the Constitution, Congress can confer on favored individuals not only the exclusive privilege of manufacturing a paper currency for the whole Union, but the right to convert the whole revenues of the Government into so much bank capital, to be used and loaned out for their individual benefit."

     Although President Van Buren, the Democratic Republican candidate, is a northerner, he is "A northern President with southern principles." Good Alabama Democrats should support him. Harrison, by contrast, will bring to power men infected with the "foul fanaticism" of abolition.

Ellison 400. Not in Sabin or American Imprints. OCLC 6382970 [8].    (28881)      $500.00

 

161.   La Ligua Gold Mining Company: LA LIGUA GOLD MINING COMPANY. THIS COMPANY IS ORGANIZED UNDER THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK WITH A CAPITAL STOCK OF FIFTY THOUSAND SHARES, OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS EACH, FULLY PAID AND FREE FROM ANY ASSESSMENT, FOR THE PURPOSE OF WORKING THE CATAPILCO GOLD MINES, IN CHILE, SOUTH AMERICA...JOHN H. FLAGLER, - - PRESIDENT. [Boston: Frank Wood, Printer, 1878]. 34pp plus portrait frontis [and original tissue guard] of John Everitt, who "sailed for Valparaiso from New York...to be associated with the General Superintendent at the Mines"; and large Bird's-Eye View [32" x 16"] and Topographical Plan of the mines. Original printed wrappers, stitched. Wrappers chipped at edges and reinforced at the spine with tape. Some chipping to several blank margins. Good+.

 

     The Company, based in New York, issued this Prospectus, which includes a detailed report from its Mining Engineer, W.A. Holcomb. Flagler, its President, was a major capitalist during the last half of the 19th century; he formed the National Tube Company and owned one of the predecessors to U.S. Steel. 

Not located on OCLC [as of 6/12].   (28959)            $450.00

 

162.   Langdon, Samuel: GOVERNMENT CORRUPTED BY VICE, AND RECOVERED  BY RIGHTEOUSNESS. A SERMON PREACHED BEFORE THE MASSACHUSETTS-BAY IN NEW-ENGLAND, ASSEMBLED AT WATERTOWN, ON WEDNESDAY THE 31ST DAY OF MAY, 1775. BEING THE ANNIVERSARY FIXED BY CHARTER FOR THE ELECTION OF COUNSELLORS. BY SAMUEL LANGDON, D.D. PRESIDENT OF HARVARD COLLEGE IN CAMBRIDGE. Watertown: Benjamin Edes, 1775. Stitched with the half title. 29, [3 blanks] pp. Scattered foxing, lightly worn, upper blank margin of half title cut. Good+.

 

     President of Harvard, Langdon was an ardent American patriot. This sermon is one of the earliest and greatest statements of the American cause at the opening of hostilities, and one of the earliest accounts of the Battle of Lexington and Concord. He spoke on Election Day, which "from the first settlement of this Colony has been sacred to Liberty, to perpetuate that invaluable privilege of chusing, from among ourselves, wise men..." But now the British Constitution "is deeply undermined and ready to tumble into ruins;- when America is threatned with cruel oppression, and the arm of power is stretched out against New- England, and especially against this Colony, to compel us to submit to the arbitrary acts of legislators who are not our representatives, and who will not themselves bear the least part of the burdens which, without mercy, they are laying upon us."

     Langdon denounces British insistence on "the most absolute submission to their unlimited claims of authority." British tyranny brutally expressed itself on "that ever memorable day," the Battle of Lexington and Concord, the previous month. "At least five or six of our inhabitants were murderously kill'd by the Regulars at Lexington, before any man attempted to return the fire, and when they were actually complying with the command to disperse; and two more of our brethren were likewise kill'd at Concord-Bridge by a fire from the King's soldiers, before the engagement began on our side." The conduct of the British rulers and soldiers-- arrogant, arbitrary, contemptuous of human life, merciless-- is chronicled, and the justice of the American cause proclaimed.

Howes L75aa. Evans 14145. Adams, American Independence 178.

   (29070)         $3,000.00

 

163.   [Lee, Arthur]: EXTRACT FROM AN ADDRESS IN THE VIRGINIA GAZETTE, ON MARCH 19, 1767. BY A RESPECTABLE MEMBER OF THE COMMUNITY. [Philadelphia?: Crukshank?, 1780?]. 4pp. Caption title [as issued]. Disbound and lightly foxed, else Very Good. Contemporary signature, 'Robert Haydocke,' at blank lower margin of page 4.

 

     A member of Virginia's elite pens a powerful plea to end slavery in Virginia. "Long and serious reflections upon the nature and consequences of slavery have convinced me, that it is a violation both of justice and religion; that it is dangerous to the safety of the community in which it prevails; that it is destructive to the growth of arts and sciences; and lastly, that it produces a numerous and very fatal train of vices, both in the slave, and in his master." Espousing the Natural Rights view of government, he asserts that "freedom is unquestionably the birth-right of all mankind, Africans as well as Europeans."

     This is one five identified printings of Lee's Extract. The caption title of this offering does not have a comma after 'Address'; the phrase "favour slavery" appears, not on the first printed page, but on page 2; the word "probable" appears on line 14, rather than on line 16, of page 4, and is spelled correctly; and the printing, "unfortunate ******** people" appears on page 2, rather than the phrase "unfortunate and detestable people." Hildeburn, Evans, and NAIP opine that this printing issued in 1780 rather than in 1767.

LCP 5748-5750. NAIP w010010, w009535, w040337, w040338, w003729. Evans 16773. Hildeburn 4006. Not in Work, Blockson, Dumond.

   (29068)         $1,750.00

 

164.   [Lee, Charles]: STRICTURES ON A PAMPHLET, ENTITLED A "FRIENDLY ADDRESS TO ALL REASONABLE AMERICANS, ON THE SUBJECT OF OUR POLITICAL CONFUSIONS." ADDRESSED TO THE PEOPLE OF AMERICA. America: Boston: Re-Printed and Sold at Greenleaf's Printing-Office..., 1775. 20pp. Untrimmed, margin-foxed, with some light text foxing. Else Very Good, in modern cloth [which is lightly worn].

 

     The Friendly Address had supported the Intolerable Acts, warned against a bloody and futile colonial rebellion, argued that the colonists were unreasonable, and insisted that English policies were just and sensible. Of the numerous responses to the 'Friendly Address,' "probably none was more talked about and laughed over, and none was more effective, than" this "sprightly brochure," which was immediately "attributed to General Charles Lee, for it has all the notes of that brilliant and Mephistophelian personage-- eccentricity, fluentness, smartness, tartness, a mocking tone, a cosmopolitan air, unusual information, an easy assumption of authority on all subjects-- particularly on those appertaining to military history and to military criticism."  Tyler, Literary History of the American Revolution 395 [1897]. Its first edition issued in 1774 from Philadelphia. This is one of five 1775 printings.  

     Lee surmises that the author of the Friendly Address [probably Thomas Bradbury Chandler] must be an Anglican, for the Address "has the want of candour and truth, the apparent spirit of persecution, the unforgivingness, the deadly hatred to Dissenters, and the zeal for arbitrary power, which has distinguished Churchmen in all ages, and more particularly the high part of the Church of England." Chandler, a clergyman who favored establishing the Church of England in the Colonies, opposed American independence in his Friendly Address and elsewhere.

FIRST EDITION. Howes L193. Adams, American Independence 125b. Evans 14151.

   (29074)         $2,500.00

 

165.   [Levy, Jonas]: IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES. MAY 4, 1858. THE COURT OF CLAIMS SUBMITTED THE FOLLOWING REPORT...IN THE CASE OF JONAS P. LEVY VS. THE UNITED STATES. [Washington: 1858]. 35th Cong., 1st Sess. SMD251. Caption title [as issued], disbound, 60pp. Occasional light toning, light scattered foxing, Very Good.

 

     During the Mexican War Levy, member of a prominent Philadelphia Jewish family and brother of Captain Uriah Levy, had commanded the United States Ship 'America' and transported American troops to Vera Cruz. General Scott appointed him Captain when the port surrendered. Before the War he had settled in Mexico, and engaged in extensive commercial business there. Having suffered various losses at the hands of Mexico, he claimed compensation and indemnity. He thus filed his claim, which the United States rejected. This litigation ensued. Levy's arguments, the Solicitor General's opposing arguments, exhibits, and decision are presented in this document.

Not located on OCLC. Not in Singerman or Cohen.   (29032)          $450.00

 

166.   Lincoln, Abraham: LETTER OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN TO THE MISSOURI RADICALS, AND SPEECH OF S.T. GLOVER, AT THE COURT HOUSE IN JEFFERSON CITY, MO., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17TH, 1863. [Jefferson City?: 1863]. Caption title [as issued]. 18pp. Disbound, margins trimmed closely but without affecting text, light spotting. One small hold in title leaf affects about five letters. Good+.

 

     The subject relates "to a demand" by Missouri Radicals "for the removal of Gen. John M. Schofield" [Monaghan]. The Civil War in Missouri was a continuation of the bitter pre-War battles between Jayhawkers and Border Ruffians over the Kansas Question. Competing Unionist factions-- differing over the status of slavery in Missouri-- sorely vexed Lincoln, who said that their "factional quarrel" had "tormented" him "beyond endurance."

     In 1863 he sought to end this strife by naming General Schofield-- whom he had previously relieved-- as Military Commander of Missouri. This move, however, brought the wrath of Radicals down upon Lincoln's head. Lincoln's Letter seeks to placate Charles Drake, leader of the Missouri Radicals, and his colleagues. It describes the tragedy of civil war: "Deception breeds and thrives. Confidence dies, and universal suspicion reigns. Each man feels an impulse to kill his neighbor, lest he be killed by him. Revenge and retaliation follow...Every foul bird comes abroad, and every dirty reptile rises up." He urges unity; Glover's speech chastises the 'Charcoals,' as the Immediate Emancipationists were called, for their unceasing and unreasonable attacks upon the President..   

Monaghan 224. Sabin 41150. As of March 2013, OCLC records only six locations, none of them in Missouri.

   (29987)         $350.00

 

167.   Lincoln, Abraham: THE REPUBLICAN PARTY VINDICATED- THE DEMANDS OF THE SOUTH EXPLAINED. SPEECH OF HON. ABRAHAM LINCOLN, OF ILLINOIS, AT THE COOPER INSTITUTE, NEW YORK CITY, FEBRUARY 27, 1860. np: [1860]. 16pp, caption title [as issued]. Folded, untrimmed. Lightly toned, lightly worn, scattered light foxing. Good+. Contemporary inscription at blank head of the title page.

 

     An unusual 16-page issue of Lincoln's Cooper Union discourse, followed, at the middle of page 9, by John Hickman's July 24, 1860 campaign speech. Page 16 prints Stephen Douglas's endorsement of the Dred Scott Decision, and criticisms of his doctrine of Popular Sovereignty. Most copies print Lincoln's speech only, in 8 pages; another 16-page printing includes addresses by Horace Greeley, General Nye, and others.

     Lincoln's great Cooper Union speech argues that the Framers and early Congresses contemplated a narrow role for slavery. Examining the constitutional and early Congressional debates, he demonstrates that contemporary statesmen viewed slavery "as an evil, not to be extended, but to be tolerated and protected only because of and so far as its actual presence among us makes that toleration and protection a necessity." Lincoln's argument received wide press coverage; it catapulted him into presidential contention, for its great contribution placed the new Republican Party at the center of American constitutional and legal thought rather than an unacceptable extreme. He thus made it easy for moderate Northern Democrats and Whigs to vote Republican in 1860.

Monaghan 54. OCLC 4774045, 43396061 [9].   (28848)      $850.00

 

168.   Lincoln Assassination: 1873 FACSIMILE OF THE FAMOUS 1865 FORD'S THEATRE POSTER FOR 'OUR AMERICAN COUSIN,' THE PLAY PERFORMED WHEN BOOTH ASSASSINATED PRESIDENT LINCOLN

. [Washington: Polkinhorn, 1873]. 3" x 5 3/4", mounted on the top margin of the blank verso on old card stock. Light wear, Good+ or so.   (29274)  $275.00

 

169.   [Lindley, G.]: ESSAY ON ESTABLISHING A GENERAL SYSTEM OF MANUFACTURES, IN ST. LOUIS AND VICINITY. [St. Louis: 1860]. 8pp, stitched. Caption title, as issued, and printed in two columns per page. Lightly dusted, Very Good.

 

     Lindley, about whom we know next to nothing, entered the copyright  to this rare pamphlet in the Eastern District of Missouri in 1860. His introductory remarks, signed at the end 'G.L.', express hope that his Essay will "ultimately be as much value to the public as the sight of a bull for which a thousand dollars has been paid, and maybe as much as the sight of a horse for which the sum of fifteen hundred dollars was paid."

      St. Louis's strategic location, "at the confluence of the two largest and longest rivers of North America," renders it unequalled "as a business place." He surveys the area's natural resources, fruit, domestic animals, fish iron, and manufacturing materials. With some common-sense planning, St. Louis can exploit these advantages and become mighty. Thanks to "The Great Engineer of the Universe," St. Louis is "stamped indelibly...as a large commercial as well as manufacturing city." He signs in type at the end, 'Manifest Destiny.'     

Not in Sabin, Eberstadt, Decker. OCLC 297540011 [1- WI Hist. Soc.] [as of August 2012].

   (29253)         $500.00

 

170.   Lindo, A[braham] A[lexandre]: A RETROSPECT OF THE PAST, AS CONNECTED WITH AND PREPARATORY TO A FAITHFUL EXPOSITION INTENDED TO BE GIVEN OF THE DIVINE WILL AND DISPENSATION DISCLOSED IN THE SACRED BOOKS RECEIVED AS AUTHORITY BY JEWS. BY...AN ISRAELITE. Cincinnati: Robinson & Jones, 1848. Original printed wrappers [light wear, spine reinforced with archival tape, three rubberstamps on blank portions] with ornamental borders, stitched. 49, [3 blanks] pp. Very Good.

 

     This scarce pamphlet is the address of 'An Israelite to the Christian World,' asserting "that Israelites view with as much concern and regret as devout Christians, the lamentable attempts to instil disbelief in a Divine revelation." Lindo argues that God's Covenant with the Jews "has never been intermitted, but has always been and still continues to be in operation." Through the revelation they received at Sinai, "the world is indebted for the civilization it now enjoys and will continue to be indebted for the preservation of that civilization." Christianity, he says, was "originally a Jewish sect, adhering strictly to the monotheism of the Old Testament," but it has "gradually become so perverted as to remove it from what it was originally."

FIRST EDITION Rosenbach 637. Singerman 1026. OCLC locates nine copies, as of October 2012, under two accession numbers. Not in Sabin, Thomson, Eberstadt, Decker.

   (29488)         $750.00

 

171.   Livingston, Edward: RAPPORT FAIT A L'ASSEMBLEE GENERALE DE L'ETAT DE LA LOUISIANE, SUR LE PROJET D'UN CODE PENAL, POUR LEDIT ETAT. Nouvelle-Orleans: Benjamin Levy, 1822. 170, [1 blank], [1 errata] pp, in somewhat later worn boards [spine cloth shorn]. Light to moderate foxing, small archival repair to margin of blank verso of first leaf [no loss]. Good+. Contemporary signature, 'R. Whittingham', at head of title.

 

     This is the first edition in French, printed in English by Levy at the same time, of one of the most important legal treatises of the 19th century. The Legislature ordered 1000 copies in each language to be printed.

     The author, a disciple of Bentham, explains the philosophical underpinnings of his penal system. "No single writer, except Jeremy Bentham, has written so much upon Codification, or as learnedly, as Livingston. His Codes are much admired for their philosophy, apparent practicability, and the characteristic wisdom of their provisions, which place their author among the best writers upon legislation" [Marvin]. "Every part of the work evinces the most elaborate attention to the preservation of a complete unity of design and aims at the prevention rather than the avenging of crime. Although it was not adopted, the publication of the code brought Livingston immediate and wide fame" [DAB]. Sir Henry Maine called him "the first legal genius of modern times" [id]. "There were many evidences of the influential character of his work," even in his lifetime. Marke 455.

FIRST EDITION. Jumonville 372. Cohen 10317. Sabin 41613. Marvin 471 [1825 printing]. I Harv. Law Cat. 1187 [English edition].   (29372)     $1,500.00

 

172.   Lope, D. Juan: IDEA SUCINTA  DEL PROBABILISMO, QUE CONTIENE LA HISTORIA ABREVIADA DE SU ORIGEN, PROGRESOS, Y DECADENCIA: EL EXAMEN CRITICO DE LAS RAZONES, QUE LO ESTABLECEN, Y UN RESUMEN DE LOS ARGUMENTOS, QUE LO IMPUGNAN. POR D. JUAN LOPE DEL RODO. QUIEN LA DEDICA ¡L EXCELENTISIMO SE—OR DON MANUEL DE AMAT Y JUNIENT, CABALLERO DEL ORDEN DE S. JUAN, GENTILHOMBRE DE CAMARA CON ENTRADA, TENIENTE GENERAL DE LOS REALES EXERCITOS, VIRREY, GOBERNADOR, Y CAPITAN GENERAL, DE LOS REYNOS DEL PERU & C. &C. | POR MANO DEL SE—OR DOCT. DON JOSEPH PERFECTO DE SALAS, FISCAL DE LA REAL AUDIENCIA DE CHILE, Y ASESOR GENERAL DE ESTOS REYNOS DEL PERU. Lima [Peru]: Imprenta Real Calle de Palacio, 1772. 6" x 8".  [74], 127, [1] pp. Bound in contemporary vellum [dustsoiled and spotted, two chips, large piece of back cover torn off], endpapers pasted to insides of covers. Title page printed in red and black inks. Occasional light foxing, else quite clean. Wormed, affecting letters or portions thereof in early and late leaves. Lower outer corners dogeared and worn, but text complete. Good+.

 

     This is the first edition of a book on the controversy over the Doctrine of Probabilism. "In Latin America, the Jesuits introduced and were mainly responsible for propagating the probabilism across the region..." Forment, Democracy in Latin America, page 64 [2003]. The doctrine met fierce opposition; it was outlawed in Peru in 1767. The Jesuits' advocacy of it led to their expulsion from Latin America in 1767, a few years before the publication of this book.

Sabin 72495. OCLC 3114085 [11]. Palau 139857. Medina, Lima 1347.

   (29132)         $1,000.00

 

173.   Lord, Eleazar: SIX LETTERS ON THE NECESSITY AND PRACTICABILITY OF A NATIONAL CURRENCY, AND THE PRINCIPLES AND MEASURES ESSENTIAL TO IT. New York: Anson D.F. Randolph, 1862. Original printed wrappers, stitched. 53, [1 blank] pp. Very Good.

 

     Lord argues that "a uniform National currency is indispensable to the interests and welfare of the people." Congress ought to make Treasury notes legal tender. Lord had a roller-coaster career. Initially quite successful in business, he founded the Manhattan Fire Insurance Company, the New York Sunday School Society, the University of the City of New York and Auburn Theological Seminary, and was the first president of the New York & Erie Railroad (1833). But he lost everything during the Panic of 1857. During the Civil War years, when he wrote this pamphlet, he was forced to depend on the kindness of relatives for his support. DAB's sketch of Lord's life notes that this pamphlet attracted the attention of the Lincoln Administration; William Seward consulted with him on national fiscal policy.

FIRST EDITION. Sabin 42024.   (30040)     $250.00

 

174.   Louisiana: CHARTER OF THE CITY OF JEFFERSON. AN ACT INCORPORATING THE CITY OF JEFFERSON... [Baton Rouge: 1867]. 15, [1 blank] pp. Caption title, as issued. Stitched, toned, lightly worn. Good+.

 

     This is Act "[No. 57.]" of the Legislature, signed at the end in type by House Speaker Duncan S. Cage, Senate President Albert Voorhies, and Governor J. Madison Wells. Jefferson is located on the East Bank of the Mississippi River; today it is part of the New Orleans Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

OCLC 10613388 [3- NYPL, Duke, Louisiana State Lib.] [as of September 2012]. Not in Thomson.

 

    (29348)        $250.00

 

175.   Louisiana: TRANSCRIPT, TAKEN VERBATIM, FROM THE AUTHENTICATED RECORD OF THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA, SITTING IN THE YEAR 1821, IN THE CITY OF NEW-ORLEANS, IN THE CASE OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA, VERSUS THE ORLEANS NAVIGATION COMPANY, IN A SUIT INSTITUTED AGAINST THEM, IN PURSUANCE OF THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS OF THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA... Washington: Way and Gideon, Printers, 1826. 24pp, disbound, lightly foxed. Trimmed a bit unevenly but no text affected. Contemporary pencil notations at page 22. Good+.

 

     Testimony for the State included that of "Alexis Rochon, free man of colour." 

     The canal in the Territory of Orleans which connected Bayou St. John with the Old Basin, later called the Carondelet Canal, was dug by order of Baron de Carondelet while Louisiana was under Spanish control. Sand bars and low water levels had frequently rendered the mouth of the Bayou impassable. Carondelet hoped a canal would solve the problem and thus open an avenue of travel and trade. After the United States purchased Louisiana, control of the Carondelet Canal passed to the Orleans Navigation Company, which the Territorial Legislature had chartered in 1805 to improve the Bayou St. John for navigation, and authorized it to collect tolls.

     The issue for decision was whether the Company had breached its duty to render the Canal navigable. This pamphlet includes testimony of witnesses, with summaries of direct and cross examinations, a deposition transcript, funds received by the Navigation Company [including toll receipts] and Company expenditures. The title page states: 'Note.- Judgment was given by the District Court, on the 27th February [crossed out, and written 'Novr.' in ink] 1821, for the defendants, and confirmed on appeal by the Supreme Court of the State on the 12th September, 1822]. 

AI 26232 [1- PPL]. OCLC 13505352 [1- LSU] [as of September 2012]. Not in Cohen or Sabin.

   (29345)         $850.00

 

176.   Low, Nathanael: AN ASTRONOMICAL DIARY; OR, ALMANACK, FOR THE YEAR OF CHRISTIAN AERA, 1777. America. Boston: Printed by J. Gill, in Queen-Street, and T. and J. Fleet, in Cornhill, [1776]. 12mo. [24] pp. Loosened, stitching absent, spotted. Good or Good+, with the woodcut map, entitled, A VIEW OF THE PRESENT SEAT OF WAR, AT AND NEAR NEW-YORK.

 

     The map shows 'General Washington's Lines on New-York Island,' the Powles Hook Fort, 'Bunker-Hill, near New-York,' King's Bridge, Hell's Gate, Fort Washington, Governor's Island, Staten Island, Newark, the 'North River,' the East River, Manhattan Island. Low also prints his 'Address to the Tories,' dated October 8, 1776, denouncing them for their disloyalty. "I cannot call you friends...Every enemy to his country and its liberties, I esteem an enemy to myself. The liberties of America and the rights of mankind, whatever your professed principles may be, your practices diametrically oppose."

     Each month of the Calendar is preceded by six lines of poetry, extolling liberty and execrating the British dictatorship. A list of Friends' Meetings, and a table of roads and distances is also included. 

Evans 14829. Drake 3264. Church 1133 [with an illustration of the title at page 2246] .

   (29104)         $2,000.00

 

177.   [Mahone, William]: THE CASE OF THE FOREIGN BONDHOLDERS AND THE ATLANTIC, MISSISSIPPI & OHIO R.R. CO: THE ANSWER OF THE COMPANY AND ACCOMPANYING DOCUMENTS; CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN GENERAL WILLIAM MAHONE, PRESIDENT, AND JOHN COLLINSON, AGENT OF THE COMPANY; ALSO, GENERAL MAHONE'S LETTER TO CAPTAIN TYLER, WHO PRESIDED OVER THE MEETING OF FOREIGN BONDHOLDERS IN LONDON, &C., &C., &C. Richmond, Virginia: 1876. 69, [3 blanks] pp. Stitched. Title page with some foxing, else a clean text. Good+ or so.

 

     General Mahone used his war record to become a major player in post-War Virginia politics and the Railroad business. He led the Virginia 'Readjusters'-- more or less populists who favored a reduction in state indebtedness-- in their battles against the 'Stalwarts.'

     Mahone organized the Atlantic, Mississippi & Ohio Railroad in 1870. Its 428-mile route linked Norfolk with Bristol by way of Petersburg, Lynchburg, and Salem. Investors from England and Scotland backed it, in the hope that it would stimulate Virginia's trade with the Ohio Valley and Mississippi Valley. However, the Panic of 1873 dashed those hopes, and the Railroad went into receivership. Thereafter the Road's foreign backers became disenchanted with Mahone: they removed him as Trustee, although he continued as its President. This pamphlet prints the relevant documents in the dispute between the bondholders and the Railroad, which was fought out in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. 

Cappon 750. OCLC 6729921 [5- U VA, Lib. VA, Duke, Appalachian State U., NYPL] [as of July 2012].

   (29043)         $250.00

 

178.   Maine Liquor Law Broadside: DEATH STRUGGLE OF THE DEMOCRACY. THE ANTI-MAINE LAW PARTY HAVE HAD PRINTED FOR DISTRIBUTION, A LARGE EDITION OF THE MAINE LAW...WE PRONOUNCE IT BASE, SLANDEROUS & UNTRUE. np: F. Ferguson, Printer, [1851-1852]. Broadside, 5" x 13". Light spotting and wear, two short closed margin tears. Good+.

 

     This pro-Temperance broadside rebuts the canard that the Sons of Temperance are the prime force behind enactment of the Maine Liquor Law. "Men of all denominations and parties are firm supporters of this law; look everywhere, and you find it depends not alone upon the Sons of Temperance." The broadside also denies "that this law makes the man who buys liquor a criminal. An absolute falsehood-- not one word of truth in it." Opponents of the law are "lying." Indeed, "DROWNING MEN CATCH AT STRAWS. BUT THE HAND-WRITING IS UPON THE WALL. A Prohibitory Liquor Law must and will be enacted."

Not located on OCLC or the AAS web site, or in Williamson or Sabin.

   (29962)         $350.00

 

179.   Male Adult School Association of Philadelphia: CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE MALE ADULT SCHOOL ASSOCIATION OF PHILADELPHIA, INSTITUTED JUNE 3, 1816. Philadelphia: Printed for the Institution, by Anderson & Meehan, 1817. 12mo. 12pp. Disbound without wraps, else Very Good.

 

     The Association sought to educate young men privately; its evening classes suggest that many of its students were in the work force. Evidently free public education was not introduced in Pennsylvania until 1818; and that was for the education of indigent children only.

     Officers and members of the Association are listed on page 2. Hugh De Haven, Jun., was President. The Association's purpose was to instruct "adult males, in reading, writing, and arithmetic; and to incite them to the study of the Holy Scriptures." Maximum number of Association members was thirty; expulsion was permitted "for unchristian behaviour, by the concurrence of two-thirds of the Association." The Association would sponsor schools, and hire teachers, for classes on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday evenings.

AI 41336 [1- DLC]. Not in Sabin. OCLC records only facsimiles [as of November 2012].

   (29558)         $275.00

 

180.   [Mason, Samson]: SPRINGFIELD, CLARK COUNTY, JAN. 11, 1827. GEN. D. M'ARTHUR, .. [Springfield, Ohio?: 1827]. 7, [1 blank] pp. Caption title [as issued]. Untrimmed, uncut, and generously margined. Spotted, Good+.

 

     Mason was a lawyer who would be elected to the Ohio State Senate in 1829, and then to Congress in 1834, where he served several terms as an anti-Jacksonian Whig. In this rare pamphlet he addresses General Duncan McArthur, who had brought an action of ejectment "against Reynolds and Van Meter, in the Court of Common Pleas for Champaign county." McArthur claimed ownership of land between the Scioto and Little Miami Rivers, pursuant to military warrants granted him by the State of Virginia. Mason represented McArthur at trial; in this rare pamphlet he defends himself against McArthur's criticisms of his trial conduct.

     The case was an important one, decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1829. See, Reynolds vs. McArthur, 27 U.S. 417 [1829] [opinion by Chief Justice Marshall]. When Virginia ceded lands to the United States in 1784, it reserved to itself the area between the Scioto and Little Miami for the satisfaction of military bounties which Virginia had promised. McArthur held title to land pursuant to a Virginia military land warrant. The Supreme Court held that McArthur's claim of ownership was superior to the purported title of persons holding under a sale made by the United States.

OCLC 492252493 [1- W. Res. Hist. Soc.] [as of November 2012]. Not in American Imprints, Sabin, Eberstadt, Thomson, Decker, Cohen.

   (29566)         $600.00

 

181.   Massachusetts: SENATE.....NO. 46. COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. IN SENATE, MARCH 4, 1841. THE COMMITTEE TO WHOM WAS REFERRED THE PETITION OF CHARLES I. TORREY AND OTHERS...ON THE SUBJECT OF THE DISABILITIES OF THE FREE PEOPLE OF COLOR, ASK LEAVE TO SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING REPORT. [Boston: 1841]. 8pp, disbound with binder holes in blank inner margin. Light scattered foxing, Good+.

 

     An early plea to abolish prohibitions on interracial marriages-- rendered even more unusual because the Committee of this Massachusetts legislature agreed with the petitioners. The Statutes "forbid the marriage of white persons with negroes, mulattoes and indians, and which inflict the disgrace and disabilities of illegitimate birth upon the children of such marriages." The Committee recommends repeal and drafts a repealing statute, which is reproduced at page 8.

     The Committee has some lawyers' fun with the existing statutes, portraying their "inconsistencies and absurdities": Case law defines mulatto as the issue of a union between a white and a black. "The inferences from this decision are obvious. The child of a black person and a mulatto, though much darker than the mulatto parent, may marry freely with white persons!" Similar permutations-- children of two mulattoes, or negroes and indians, for example-- "however tawny, are equally at liberty to contract such marriages under our laws."

Dumond 79. Not located in American Imprints, Cohen, or LCP. Not located on OCLC [as of August 2012].

   (29270)         $350.00

 

182.   [Mather, Moses]: AMERICA'S APPEAL TO THE IMPARTIAL WORLD. WHEREIN THE RIGHTS OF THE AMERICANS, AS MEN, BRITISH SUBJECTS, AND AS COLONISTS, THE EQUITY OF THE DEMAND, AND OF THE MANNER IN WHICH IT IS MADE UPON THEM BY GREAT-BRITAIN, ARE STATED AND CONSIDERED. AND, THE OPPOSITION MADE BY THE COLONIES TO ACTS OF PARLIAMENT, THEIR RESORTING TO ARMS IN THEIR NECESSARY DEFENCE, AGAINST THE MILITARY ARMAMENTS, EMPLOYED TO ENFORCE THEM, VINDICATED. Hartford: Printed by Ebenezer Watson, 1775. 72pp. Disbound. Lightly toned and foxed, closed tear [no loss] to title leaf inconspicuously and expertly repaired. Several leaves trimmed closely at the bottom margin, affecting a couple of catchwords, last leaf toned with blank inner margin chipping. Title page with quotations from Isaiah, Jeremiah, and 2 Samuel. Good+.

 

     This is one of the great Revolutionary War sermons, justifying the American cause on religious, political, and philosophical grounds. Americans have been endowed with natural rights, which are "antecedent to any charters, or colony constitutions under the crown." Mather explains the nature of American liberties, as Natural Rights and under the British Constitution. Like many political thinkers of the time, he argues for a system in which Power is "so judiciously placed as to connect the force and preserve the rights of all; each estate, armed with a power of self-defense against the encroachments of the other two."

     Mather's Appeal "breathes the fire of righteous patriotism characteristic of the pulpit of the time, as can be seen from the three mighty Old Testament texts on the title page, and is a superb statement of American liberty." Sandoz [editor], Political Sermons of the American Founding Era, No. 15 [2d ed. 1998], vol. 1. Born in Lyme, Connecticut, Mather graduated from Yale with the class of 1739. He began preaching in 1742 in Darien, and stayed for 64 years. "As a champion of liberty, he became an especially obnoxious personality to Tories in his vicinity; he was even twice imprisoned for his views: In 1779 he was seized in his home and imprisoned in New York for five weeks, and in 1781 the British arrived at his church during services and confined him and around fifty of his congregation in New York for some months." Id.

FIRST EDITION. Howes A214 'aa', M407 'b'. Evans 14253. Holmes, Minor Mathers 11. Bailyn, Ideological Origins of the American Revolution 73 and passim.

   (29102)         $3,500.00

 

183.   Mather, Samuel: AN APOLOGY FOR THE LIBERTIES OF THE CHURCHES IN NEW ENGLAND: TO WHICH IS PREFIX'D, A DISCOURSE CONCERNING CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHES. BY...PASTOR OF A CHURCH IN BOSTON, NEW ENGLAND. Boston: T. Fleet, for Daniel Henchman, 1738. Original paneled calf with raised spine bands [some rubbing, hinges starting]. [8], ix, [1 blank], [errata leaf], [1 blank], 116 [i.e., 216] pp. Widely scattered foxing, light wear, else Very Good. Later owner's inkstamp at blank upper margin of title page.

 

     Mather argues for "the Royal Favour and Protection in the undisturb'd Enjoyment of the Liberties of our Churches and Schools." His Preface, in the form of a dedication to "Mr. Holden, one of the Directors of the Bank of England, at London," emphasizes "that it would by no Means do well for [the King] to take away from the People of New-England any of their Privileges," which were "confirm'd unto them by the Charter, which was granted to this Province by King William and Queen Mary of glorious and immortal Memory."

     Mather explains the governing principles of New England's Congregational churches, and their differences with-- and advantages over-- the "National churches in various Kingdoms and Countries, with an Uniformity of Doctrine and of Discipline." Those national churches require "the Aid of the secular Powers," but the Congregational way is independent of them.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 4275. Holmes, Minor Mathers 60 [reproducing the title page at page 113]. Brinley Sale 1323.

   (29428)         $1,000.00

 

184.   [McCoy, Isaac]: REMOVE INDIANS WESTWARD. WITH BILL NO. 449. FEBRUARY 18, 1829...MR. MCLEAN, FROM THE COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS, TO WHICH THE SUBJECT HAD BEEN REFERRED, MADE THE FOLLOWING REPORT:.. [Washington: 1829. 48pp. Disbound, lightly toned with occasional light spotting, rubberstamp at blank portion of title page. Good+.

 

     "Written after a personal tour of inspection of the country proposed" [Howes]. "In March, 1828 McCoy was appointed to 'accompany an exploring party of Indians west of the Mississippi.' Pages 6-24 contain his report of this expedition; which is followed by the reports of Captain Kennerly and Lieutenant Hood. Appended thereto is a transcript of the original field notes giving courses, distances and daily observations on the country passed through. This issue, interestingly enough, has apparently escaped previous description. Dr. Camp gives the collation as 23 pages rather than 48 pages as here contained. Very evidently the present is the hitherto unlocated issue described in Wagner-Camp, No. 81, note as: 'Not seen'" [Eberstadt]. The 23-page printing does not include the Hood and Kennerly documents.

     Wagner-Camp-Becker now leads with the 48-page printing: "McCoy's report, with its covering letter, describes  his tour of the country west of the Arkansas Territory with a delegation of Indians who were to be moved across the Mississippi. Reports of Lt. Washington Hood and Capt. G.H. Kennerly make up the second half of the document."

112 Eberstadt 470. Howes M71aa [23pp]. Wagner-Camp-Becker 38. 39 Decker 188. Gilcrease-Hargrett 204.

   (29374)         $750.00

 

185.   Michigan: ACTS OF THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF MICHIGAN, PASSED AT THE FIRST AND EXTRA SESSIONS, OF 1835 AND 1836. Detroit: J.S. Bagg, Printer to the Legislature, 1836. 396pp. Several light rubberstamps, some leaves lightly toned. Bound in later cloth [some spotting], with morocco spine titles and gilt institution name at base of spine, Good+.

 

     These are the first State laws, though apparently passed during the last year of Michigan's territorial status. As a condition of Michigan's admission to the Union as a State, it had to settle its boundary with Ohio and the dispute which had erupted into the so-called Toledo War. This Legislature enacted a bill complying with this requirement. A List of Acts and an Index are included.

AII [Michigan] 304. Babbitt 248.   (29991)   $750.00

 

186.   Miner, A.A.; and R.C. Pitman: SHALL CRIMINALS SIT ON THE JURY? A REVIEW OF GOVERNOR ANDREW'S VETO, WITH OTHER DOCUMENTS ON THE SUBJECT. Boston: Published by the Massachusetts Temperance Alliance, 1865. Stitched in original printed orange wrappers [lightly dusted]. 70, [2 blanks] pp. Very Good plus. 'Read and Circulate' is printed at the head of the front wrapper and the title. Ownership signature on front wrapper of F. C. [?] Baxter.

 

     Miner was a minister; Pitman was a State Senator closely identified with the Temperance and Prohibition movement. That movement had succeeded in enacting a law prohibiting and rendering criminal the sale or production of alcoholic beverages. The proposed Massachusetts Jury Bill-- which Governor Andrew vetoed-- required a juror to be of "good moral character," which meant that the prospective juror was not "engaged in any business or occupation made criminal by the laws of the Commonwealth," i.e., the liquor trade. 

     Miner deplores Boston's effective nullification of the prohibitory law. Indeed, he says, the City "defiantly resists the execution of the law." Though unmentioned, much of Miner's ire is directed at the habits of the Boston Irish; Governor Andrew's veto was the result, in part, of his stated fear that the Bill would be employed to discriminate against prospective jurors based on their religion or national origin. Senator Pitman's speech seeks passage of the Jury Bill over the Governor's veto. Press criticism of the veto is also printed.

Sabin 49198.   (29305)            $250.00

 

187.   Montefiore, J[oshua]: SYNOPSIS OF MERCANTILE LAWS, WITH AN APPENDIX: CONTAINING THE MOST APPROVED FORMS OF NOTARIAL AND COMMERCIAL PRECEDENTS, SPECIAL AND COMMON, REQUIRED IN THE DAILY TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS, BY MERCHANTS, TRADERS, NOTARIES, ATTORNIES, ETC. A NEW EDITION REVISED, CORRECTED AND ENLARGED, WITH REFERENCES TO THE ALTERATIONS EFFECTED BY THE REVISED STATUTES OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. New York: G. & C. & H. Carvill, 1830. xvii, [1 blank], [168], 335, [3] pp. Bound in original sheep [lightly rubbed], with gilt-lettered red morocco spine label. Occasional mild foxing, Very Good plus.

 

     Montefiore, a Jew born in England, graduated from Oxford in the early 1780's and was admitted to the Bar. After an unsuccessful attempt to establish a colony off the coast of West Africa, he accepted a military commission as Captain in the British army, purportedly the first Jew so honored. He emigrated to Philadelphia about 1803, published and edited a weekly journal, and established himself there. Montefiore spent his latter years in St. Albans, Vermont, where he died and is buried.

     The Synopsis is an alphabetically organized explanation of terms and concepts used in commercial transactions, complete with forms, an Index, and profuse explanations. A two-page list of subscribers is included. Though called a "new" edition, this is evidently its first printing, at least under this title. An alleged 1820 printing recorded by Shaw and Shoemaker is, as Cohen notes, a ghost.

FIRST EDITION. Cohen 2434. II Harv. Law Cat. 142. Not in Singerman or Rosenbach.

        (29221)    $650.00

 

188.   Morris, Gouverneur: AN ORATION, UPON THE DEATH OF GENERAL WASHINGTON. DELIVERED AT THE REQUEST OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK, ON THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1799. AND PUBLISHED BY THEIR REQUEST. New York: John Furman, 1800. 24pp, with the errata at the base of page 24 and the statement, 'Copy Right Secured to the Corporation.' Disbound and lightly foxed, else Very Good.

 

     A graceful and beautifully crafted Oration. "There are issues with and without Errata on p. 24, and several variants of the former." Evans. "Two states of gathering C noted. The second state includes on p.24 an errata note and the line 'Copyright secured to the Corporation,' not found in the first state." NAIP.

Evans 38002. NAIP w021570. Stillwell 178.   (29064)         $250.00

 

189.   Morrison & Fourmy: MORRISON & FOURMY'S GENERAL DIRECTORY OF THE CITY OF HOUSTON 1887-88| CONTAINING THE PRESENT STATE, COUNTY AND CITY GOVERNMENTS, AND A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL COUNTY OFFICIALS, POST OFFICES AND MONEY ORDER OFFICES IN TEXAS; ALSO, AN INDEX OF SOCIETIES, ASSOCIATIONS, CHURCHES, CORPORATIONS, EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES, THE FULL NAME AND ADDRESS OF ALL RESIDENTS, THEIR OCCUPATIONS OR PURSUITS, AND A COMPLETE CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. ALSO, A VALUABLE STREET INDEX OR GUIDE. PRICE, $4.00. Galveston: Morrison & Fourmy, Compilers and Publishers, [1887]. Original blue cloth [some rubbing], stamped with gilt-lettered advertisements. 24, 63, [1], 25-40, [65]-332, 41-48, 333-357. [1], 49-60, [3] pp [as issued]. Hundreds of advertisements, printed on thick pink card stock, or interleaved on colored paper without pagination. A clean and attractive text, Very Good plus.

 

     A rare, early Houston directory, filled with all the data suggested by the title and loaded with information from local merchants, generally in the form of advertisements. The book is a remarkable achievement by Morrison & Fourmy, who began publishing Texas directories in the late 1870s. OCLC locates only a couple of Houston directories by this firm.

Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Graff, Soliday, Rader, Raines, Jenkins [Basic Texas Books].

   (28803)         $1,500.00

 

190.   [Nat Turner Insurrection] [Harrison, Jesse Burton]: REVIEW OF THE SLAVE QUESTION, EXTRACTED FROM THE AMERICAN QUARTERLY REVIEW, DEC. 1832; BASED ON THE SPEECH OF TH. MARSHALL, OF FAUQUIER: SHOWING THAT SLAVERY IS THE ESSENTIAL HINDRANCE TO THE PROSPERITY OF THE SLAVE-HOLDING STATES; WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO VIRGINIA. THOUGH APPLICABLE TO OTHER STATES WHERE SLAVERY EXISTS. Richmond: Printed by T.W. White, 1833. 48pp, disbound, title leaf with light to moderate foxing. Small hole in first text leaf [affecting one word and a few letters] and blank portion of title leaf. Clipped signature of John Thompson Brown, the Virginia lawyer, member of the House of Delegates, and delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829-1831. In Brown's hand, attribution of authorship to J.B. Harrison. Good+.

 

     Nat Turner's slave insurrection in Southampton County, Virginia, brought to reality the South's worst nightmare. The incident sparked the only concerted effort by a Slave State to abolish slavery within its borders. Charles Faulkner [from western Virginia] and Thomas Jefferson's grandson, Thomas Jefferson Randolph, led the struggle. Their bill would free all children born of slave parents after July 4, 1840. They and their supporters argued that slavery diminished the value of free labor, impaired the work ethic, and thus fatally damaged the body politic for the sake of the enrichment of a few wealthy plantation owners. They failed, in good part because the malapportioned Virginia legislature was tilted in favor of the Tidewater aristocracy. The seriousness of the debate is reflected in the large number of speeches and pamphlets issuing from the Richmond press of T.W. White.

     Harrison, a resident of Lynchburg, believed, like Thomas Marshall, that slavery was a social evil: "inanimation of public spirit- destruction of the spirit of industry in the free population- the degradation of labour itself- ruin of agriculture, by a wasteful mode of cultivation- interposing obstacles to the improvement of the soil- and the encouragement of habits and opinions, destructive of economy and enterprize." 

Haynes 7936. LCP 4631. Dumond 64. Sabin 70270.   (29437)         $500.00

 

191.   [Nat Turner Insurrection] [Leigh, Benjamin Watkins]: THE LETTER OF APPOMATOX TO THE PEOPLE OF VIRGINIA: EXHIBITING A CONNECTED VIEW OF THE RECENT PROCEEDINGS IN THE HOUSE OF DELEGATES, ON THE SUBJECT OF THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY; AND A SUCCINCT ACCOUNT OF THE DOCTRINES BROACHED BY THE FRIENDS OF ABOLITION, IN DEBATE: AND THE MISCHIEVOUS TENDENCY OF THOSE PROCEEDINGS AND DOCTRINES. Richmond: Thomas W. White, Printer, 1832. 47, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, light to moderate foxing, with the author's name written in ink on the title page. Good+.

 

      The previous year Nat Turner had led the slave insurrection in Southampton County, Virginia, a profoundly disturbing realization of the South's worst nightmare. The incident sparked the first and last concerted effort by a Slave State to abolish slavery within its borders. Charles Faulkner, from western Virginia, and Thomas Jefferson's grandson, Thomas Jefferson Randolph, led the struggle. Their bill would have freed all children born of slave parents after July 4, 1840. They argued that slavery diminished the value of free labor, impaired the work ethic, and thus fatally damaged the body politic for the sake of the enrichment of a few wealthy plantation owners. They failed, in good part because the malapportioned Virginia legislature was tilted in favor of the Tidewater aristocracy. The seriousness of the debate is evidenced by the large number of speeches and pamphlets issuing from the Richmond press of T.W. White.

     A Virginia Whig and widely respected lawyer, Leigh became Reporter of Decisions of the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. There were evidently two issues of this pamphlet, the other spelling 'Appomattox' with two 't's. Here Leigh reflects on the "scene of atrocious crime" of the Southampton "rebellion," describes its course, and the "instigations of the devil" which had motivated Nat Turner. He regards efforts to abolish slavery as "inflammatory and mischievous," the result of "unmanly panic...Who could have anticipated, that the bloody horrors of the Southampton massacre, instead of suggesting plans for stricter discipline, would give birth to schemes of emancipation?...I burn with shame and indignation at the thought." Leigh reviews in detail the debates in the Virginia Legislature, analyzes the respective arguments, and contends that there is no "constitutional power to abolish the rights of slave property, without the consent and against the will of its owners."

Howes V118. Haynes 10580. LCP 644 and AI 13372 [5] [the other issue].   (29458)         $1,000.00

 

192.   Nelson, H[enry] A[ddison]: MISSOURI: A THANKSGIVING DISCOURSE, DELIVERED IN THE UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, BY...PASTOR OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. SAINT LOUIS, 1859. Canandaigua, N.Y.: 1860. 15, [1 blank] pp. Stitched. Lightly toned, else Very Good.

 

     "A panegyric on the greatness of the State" [Eberstadt]. Nelson was Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in St. Louis from 1856 until 1868. According to the online site of the First Presbyterian Church of Auburn, New York, where Nelson had earlier been installed as Pastor, "He became so distinguished as a New School leader and abolitionist that he was called to First Presbyterian Church in St. Louis to face the challenges of abolition in the days before the Civil War. Rev. Nelson is credited with saving Missouri for the Union." Nelson's Discourse explains Missouri's "natural advantages": its location at "the point of confluence of two of the grandest rivers of the world," and at the center of the Union; touts its intertwined commercial relations with the world, its agricultural and mineral resources, which "can scarcely be adequately and truthfully described without the appearance of hyperbole."

     "Most significant" is that "this State is to be not only a populous and powerful, but a Free State." For a variety of reasons, slavery is fast diminishing in Missouri. "They go from our State as slaves, into States in which they will still be held in the same condition." Nelson acknowledges that his fellow citizens "are not about to enfranchise an enslaved race." But he is anguished by the sight of "this living human freight bestowed upon one of our steamers" heading to the deep South; and warns that God may conclude that we are "forfeiting His favor."

114 Eberstadt 522. OCLC locates three copies under two accession numbers [as of September 2012]. Plumley, The Presbyterian Church Throughout the World [New York: 1874], page 720. Not in Dumond, LCP, Work.

   (29367)         $500.00

 

193.   Nelson, Henry A.: PRESBYTERIAL RELATIONS. ACTION OF THE PRESBYTERY OF ST. LOUIS, ON THE REQUEST FOR DISMISSION OF REV. J. JERMAIN PORTER, WITH REMARKS UPON THE SAME, BY REV. HENRY A. NELSON, MODERATOR OF THE PRESBYTERY. Saint Louis: [Missouri Democrat Book and Job Office], 1860. 14, [2 blanks] pp. Stitched in original printed wrappers. Minor wear, ownership signature at head of front wrapper. Near Fine.

 

     This rare pamphlet is a window on the bitter dispute between Old School and New School Presbyterians. Reverend Porter sought to leave the Presbytery of St. Louis in order to unite with the Old School Presbytery of St. Louis. The New School Presbytery here cordially grants Porter's request. But it bitterly observes that the incident illustrates the Old School's "deep injustice...persistently refusing every proposal for honorable union with our body, while they are ready to receive any of our ministers and churches who will consent to leave us." A history of the dispute is given.

     According to the online site of the First Presbyterian Church of Auburn, New York, where Nelson had earlier been installed as Pastor, "He became so distinguished as a New School leader and abolitionist that he was called to First Presbyterian Church in St. Louis to face the challenges of abolition in the days before the Civil War. Rev. Nelson is credited with saving Missouri for the Union."

Not in Sabin. OCLC 81570677 [2- JKM Library, Clements] [as of 6/12].   (29003) $250.00

 

194.   New Orleans: REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF TWO HUNDRED CITIZENS APPOINTED AT A MEETING OF THE RESIDENT POPULATION OF NEW ORLEANS, ON THE 12TH DECEMBER, 1872. New Orleans: Picayune Steam Press, 1873. Original printed wrappers [clean, but with a bit of corner wear] with wrapper title [as issued]. 27, [1 blank] pp. Minor wear, clean text, Very Good plus.

[with] Typescript Letter, laid in, from New Orleans, March 22, 1873, [1] page: 'Dear Sir: We assume the liberty to commend to your patriotism, and to your love of our common country the accompanying Report...' It is signed in type by Thos. A. Adams, Chairman, and five others, comprising the Executive Committee of the Committee of Two Hundred Citizens. Fine.

 

     The Committee presents its memorial of "the discontents, pressures, and grievances under which the people of the State were suffering from the unconstitutional and revolutionary action of a portion of the federal authorities," especially the United States District Court's intervention in the elections of 1872, in favor of the Pinchback government. The elections had produced rival claimants for the governorship, and sparked the notorious Colfax massacre, in which 280 blacks were killed, some while attempting to surrender to whites armed with rifles and a cannon. The Report is signed in type by Thomas A. Adams, Chairman, and five other members of the Executive Committee.

FIRST EDITION. 136 Eberstadt 391.    (29323)      $500.00

 

195.   New York: REPORT OF THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE PETITIONS TO PREVENT SLAVE HUNTING IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. TRANSMITTED TO THE LEGISLATURE, FEBRUARY 11, 1860. Albany: C. Van Benthuysen, 1860. Original printed blue wrappers. Stitched. 11, [1 blank] pp. Light chipping at forecorners, else Fine.

 

     This Report is a legislative reaction to the firestorm created by the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 and New York's celebrated Lemmon Slave Case. In 1852 the Lemmons left their native Virginia with their eight slaves and steamed to New York, where a Free Negro named Louis Napoleon filed a writ of habeas corpus to free the Lemmons' slaves. New York courts granted the writ, concluding that the State was free soil, and that any prior slave status was nullified by entry within its borders. Public opinion in New York wholeheartedly agreed.

     This Committee, endorsing Personal Liberty legislation which would effectively nullify the Fugitive Slave Act within New York State, reflects the widespread northern hatred of the Act and the endorsement of Free Soil doctrine. It also summarizes similar Personal Liberty laws enacted in other Northern States. The Report gives a resounding 'No' to the questions, "Shall the soil of the Empire State be longer polluted by the track of the slave hunter? Shall we ourselves be subject to his call to chase and catch his human prey? Shall we be subject to fines and imprisonments, for refusing thus to degrade and dehumanize ourselves?"

FIRST EDITION. LCP 7109. Dumond 85.   (26636)           $500.00

 

196.   New York Central & Hudson River R.R.: THE AMERICAN TRANS-CONTINENTAL ROUTE VIA NEW YORK CENTRAL & HUDSON RIVER R.R. AND CONNECTIONS, THE ONLY 4 TRACK LINE. NEW YORK TO OMAHA; THE UNION AND CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILWAYS, OMAHA TO SAN FRANCISCO; AND THE PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY'S LINES, FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO DESTINATION. THROUGH RATES OF FARE... New York: April 16, 1878. Broadside, 8 1/2" x 13", printed on pale purple paper [lightly sunned]. An attractive broadside. Very Good.

 

     The broadside prints fares in "U.S. Gold" to Honolulu, Auckland, Hong Kong, Yokohama, and elsewhere in the Pacific, as of May 1878, for 1st Class, Special 1st Class, Servants, and 3d Class; rates for children; instructions for procuring through passage tickets. "Passengers from Europe on arrival at New York are met at the Steamship landings by an authorized Agent, who is able to converse in the several European languages." G.B. Meeker, General Passenger Agent, signs in typescript at the end.

Not located on OCLC.   (29268)        $250.00

 

197.   New York City in the Civil War: DOCUMENTS FROM THE 'EXECUTIVE WAR COMMITTEE TO PROMOTE VOLUNTEERING IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK.'. [New York: 1863]. Various sizes. With manuscript minutes of six Committee meetings [Dec. 8, Dec. 11, Dec. 15, Dec. 18, Dec. 29, 1863, Jan. 5 1864 (the latter is printed on same sheets as Dec. 29 meeting)]; related manuscripts [resolutions and reports] dated Dec. 2, 1863; Jan. 4 and 5, 1864; and one undated item;  three printed General Orders from the War Department [No. 191 for recruiting veteran volunteers, No. 305 containing amendment to No. 191, and No. 375 for granting furloughs to re-enlisted volunteers]; and manuscript of General Orders No. 305 [Sept. 11, 1863]. A few occasional short splits along a fold. Else Very Good. 

 

     New York City hosted a mass meeting on December 3, 1863-- several months after the Draft Riots-- to avoid future such horrors and to inspire volunteers to fill New York's recruitment quotas. A Committee, formally known as 'The Executive War Committee to promote Volunteering in the City of New York,' was organized for that purpose, with representatives from each of the City's congressional districts. Dozens of New York City civic leaders were involved.

     The Committee appointed members to secure reenlistments among the veterans at the front, lobbied for higher military pay and prompt payment of bounties, and sought to stimulate enthusiasm. In the notes from the December 15th meeting, a member reported "that he had heard of twenty-nine colored men having been taken from this city today for enlistment in Connecticut, and he thought something ought to be done, if possible, to stop recruits leaving the city for other places." There was much discussion of the need for the $300 bounty to be paid to all re-enlisting soldiers, including those re-enlisting "in the field." The Committee feared that failure to pay these bounties would cause soldiers to feel "deceived", with "reenlistments virtually stopped." 

     Several of the prominent New Yorkers listed in the documents are George Opdyke [mayor of New York], Josiah Sutherland [lawyer and judge], John T. Hoffman [future mayor of New York], John Pruyn [Treasurer of the New York Central Railroad], Thos. C. Acton [President of the Board of Police Commissioners and battler against the Draft Rioters], William Seligman [Jewish merchant and banker], Prosper M. Wetmore [City businessman], Col. George Bliss, Jr. [Paymaster General of New York State, lawyer, and railroad man], Spencer Kirby [who helped soldiers in the field to vote in the 1864 elections], Stephen Hyatt [active in the Union League].

   (25468)         $1,500.00

 

198.   New York Fire Department Engine Company No. 42: MANUSCRIPT LEDGER OF THE NEW YORK CITY FIRE DEPARTMENT ENGINE COMPANY NO. 42, JANUARY 9 - APRIL 10, 1879. New York City: 1879. 9" x 14". 481pp, lined. Half leather and black cloth, raised spine bands [well worn], small hand written paper label on front board. Neat and clean manuscript text in red and brown inks. Rubberstamp with manuscript on front flyleaf reads, "Complainant Exhibit No. 702, March[?] 4, 1891. G.E.P.H., Master." Stationer's plate of Clarence Levey & Co., 184 William St., New York, on front pastedown. Very Good.

 

     This manuscript ledger of New York City Fire Department Engine Company No. 42 describes its activities from January 9-April 10, 1879. Company 42 moved several times over the years. The January 25, 1881, edition of the New York Evening Express lists its location at Fulton Avenue and 167th Street, in the South Bronx. Members listed on a front flyleaf include: William Frost, Foreman; George Jarvis, Engineer; Jon Murphy, Fireman; William J. Kerneghan, John H. McKniff, Stephen A. Kent, William Riker and Abraham Storm, Privates. The ledger contains detailed daily logs on the doings of the Company: dates and times of alarms, locations of fire calls, inspections, attendance at training school, absences, telegraph tests, meal times, exercising and grooming of horses, receipt of equipment for horses, etc. There are numerous entries about receiving "official papers" from Chemical Engine Companies Nos. 2, 3 and 4, and Hook and Ladder Company No. 18, and forwarding these on to the Battalion Headquarters, making it appear the five companies were interconnected.

     Examples of entries include:

February 16, 1879, "Received Chimney fire by Citizen. Fireman John Murphy and private Wm. Riker proseded to 3d [?] Blvd., 157th & 168th and the same in fire the building was owned by Thomas G. Dodworth and Ocupant George Bradley. The flue of the 2nd floor Rear of the Building [was on fire] it was extinguished by the above. The Size of Building was 15 t 20 feet."

March 26, 1879, "Look out for a man going around making collection for the benefite of a family he has a paper with official Heading of this Department warn the citizens to have him arrested messiage sined Chief Bates;"

April 4, 1879, "Received the following from Foreman Hutchinson. Notify Foreman Frost that Engineer of Steamer James K. Giles is Ordered to report to Medical Office 9 of am on the 4th inst. and can not report to him until after medical examination."

   (29489)         $600.00

 

199.   New York Fire Department Hook and Ladder Company No. 19: MANUSCRIPT LEDGER OF THE NEW YORK CITY FIRE DEPARTMENT HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 19, DECEMBER 23, 1885 - MARCH 29, 1886. New York City: [Maverick & Wisinger], 1885-1886. 9.5" x 14". 500, [1] pp, lined. Half leather and black cloth, raised spine bands with gilt decoration [rubbed, corners well worn], hand written paper spine labels, marbled endpapers. Gilt stationer's stamp at base of spine: "Maverick & Wisinger. 175 Fulton St, New York;" additional paper label on front pastedown. Neat and clean manuscript text in red and brown inks. Very Good.

 

     This manuscript ledger of New York City Fire Department Hook and Ladder Company No. 19, located in the Bronx, describes its activities from December 23, 1885-March 29, 1886. The boundaries of this Company's district as of 1882 were McComb's Dam Bridge, Jerome Avenue, Kingsbridge Road, and Harlem River. [REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK FOR THE THREE MONTHS AND YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31,1882. Page 11.] Names and addresses of members listed on a front flyleaf include: Alexander McDonald, Foreman; Bernard J. Reilly, Asst. Foreman; Thomas C. Lee, Francis McKiernan, John J. See, Richard Nodine, Matthew Reilly, James F. Fitzpatrick, firemen. The ledger contains detailed daily logs on the doings of the Company: dates and times of alarms, locations of fire calls, dates of inspections, absences, telegraph tests, meal times, maintenance of horses and equipment, etc.    (29778) $450.00

 

200.   New York State Council of the Order of American Firemen: JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS OF THE FIFTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE NEW YORK STATE COUNCIL ORDER AMERICAN FIREMEN. [bound with] REPORT OF THE SIXTH ANNUAL CONVENTION... [np: New York? Newburgh? Waverly, NY?: 1892]. [6], 202, [2] pp. Continuously paginated. Bound in stiff cardboard printed wrappers [binding somewhat shaken, original staples, last several gatherings loose]. Lightly worn. Text with decorated borders [orange flames]. Profusely illustrated, hundreds of advertisements. About Very Good.

 

     This rare book is extremely interesting for its portrayal of the culture and organization of fire-fighting at the close of the 19th century. It includes many photo illustrations and biographies of Council members; as well as advertisements for hundreds of fire-related and other New York goods and services, including breweries and beer, silks and dress goods, stoves, fire ladders, dry goods, coal merchants, ladder locks, sanitary woolens, hotels, hook & ladder trucks, banks, lumber, fire alarms, ice, roofing, cigars, hotels. Many of the advertisements are illustrated. The Journal and Reports of the Convention are printed.

Not located on OCLC.   (29293)        $500.00

 

201.   New-Market Imprint: ECCLESIASTICAL ANNALS. REPORT OF THE TRANSACTIONS OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN TENNESSEE SYNOD, DURING THEIR TWELFTH SESSION, HELD IN BUEHLER'S CHURCH, SULLIVAN COUNTY, TENN. FROM MONDAY 12TH, TO FRIDAY THE 16TH SEPTEMBER, 1831. New-Market: Printed in S[olomon] Henkel's Office, 1832. 18pp, unbound [stitches perished], untrimmed, partly uncut. Light scattered foxing, Very Good.

 

     Located in East Tennessee, Sullivan County was originally part of North Carolina. Its county seat is Blountville, which is located well over 200 miles from Henkel's press in New Market, Virginia. The Synod's connection with Henkel is explained by the facts that Paul Henkel was a leader of the Tennessee Synod in the early 19th century, the Henkel press was the major if not the only outlet for Lutheran publications in the country, and Solomon Henkel's descendants and relatives numbered among the Synod's ministers.

     This rare pamphlet-- which OCLC locates only at the Library of Virginia and the University of Virginia-- lists the participants, including several Henkels, and records their doings. Ambrose Henkel was the Secretary of the Synod, and signs his name in type at the end. A eulogy is presented for the recently departed David Henkel.

OCLC 24497367 [2] [as of 7/12]. Not in American Imprints or Haynes.

   (29037)         $375.00

 

202.   Niles, H[ezekiah]: THE AGRICULTURE OF THE U. STATES. [Wheeling (VA): Curtis, Printer, 1827]. 16pp, disbound. Caption title, as issued. First leaf has a corner fox blotch and a small tear at blank lower corner, else scattered mild foxing. Good+.

 

     A scarce and interesting plea for federal protection from ruinous foreign competition in the production and sale of agricultural products. Absent tariffs, "the greatest and most important branch of business, the agricultural, will fail to produce a reasonable profit to land owners and those who till the soil; and a comparative state of want, (in the present condition of society,) become the portion of this chosen and peculiarly valuable people-- the free cultivators of their own lands-- the best depository of the morals, the rights and the liberty of their country-- the class which must mainly defend our institutions at arms."

     This call for federal intervention to protect the idealized Jeffersonian yeoman was at odds with the free-trade position of much of the South, which opposed the protectionist lobbies of northern manufacturers.    

Norona 601. OCLC 25537437 [5- NYPL, Trinity, Boston Ath., U So. Car., U VA] [as of October 2012]. Not in Haynes, Swem, Eberstadt.

   (29448)         $750.00

 

203.   Nixon, William: PROSODY MADE EASY. WHEREIN, THE RULES ARE MORE BRIEF, COMPREHENSIVE AND PERSPICUOUS, THAN ANY HITHERTO PUBLISHED; AND ARE SO PLAIN AND SUCCINCT, THAT A CHILD LEARNING THE DECLENSIONS, MOODS AND TENSES, MAY AT THE SAME TIME BE TAUGHT THE QUANTITIES OF THE SYLLABLES, AND READ WITH PROPRIETY FROM THE VERY BEGINNING... Philadelphia: Printed and sold by William Spotswood, Sold Also by Mr. Hugh Gaine, Bookseller, New-York; Wright & Co. Charleston, South Carolina... , 1786. 12mo. xvi [i.e., xiii], [3], 36 pp. Bound in original quarter calf and marbled paper over boards [some rubbing]. Very Good, with contemporary writing on the endpapers concerning the Duncan family's accounts, including horses and a "stock of Negroes." Bookplate of the noted Americanist Michael Zinman.

 

     The Charleston reference in the imprint is explained by the fact that Nixon was a teacher there. Nixon dedicates the book to Benjamin Franklin. Nixon writes that, "In the late War, being a Prisoner in France, I inclosed the following Book" to Franklin, who was the American Ambassador to France. Franklin replied: "Should you, as a Prisoner on Parole, want Money for immediate Use, draw on me and your Bill will be paid on Sight." In the 'Recommendations' section, Franklin tenders his thanks to Nixon. Another recommendation comes from Walker Maury of the "University of Williamsburgh, Virginia."

     Page xiii is incorrectly numbered xvi, as issued. Nixon explains and illustrates the rules of Latin grammar, asserting that "An Acquaintance with the Latin Language is a necessary Qualification for the Study of Law, Physic, or Divinity, and constitutes a Part of the Accomplishments of a Gentleman."  

Evans 19867. Ford, Franklin 928.

   (29119)         $1,000.00

 

204.   North Carolina Imprint: REPORT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH SESSION, OF THE EVAN. LUTHERAN TENN. SYNOD HELD IN BUEHLER'S CHURCH, SULLIVAN CO., TENN. FROM THE 2D TO THE 7TH OCTOBER, 1847. Salem [NC]: Printed by Blum & Son, 1847. Stitched in original plain wrappers. 24pp. Lightly spotted. Chip at lower corner affects several words, Good+.

 

     A full record of the proceedings, with reports, addresses, and names of participants. This pamphlet is evidently unrecorded, although the University of North Carolina does own a copy.

Not located on OCLC [as of February 2013] or in Sabin, Thornton.   (29862)         $275.00

 

205.   Nott, Samuel: SLAVERY AND THE REMEDY; OR, PRINCIPLES AND SUGGESTIONS FOR A REMEDIAL CODE. FIFTH EDITION; WITH A REVIEW OF THE DECISION OF THE SUPREME COURT IN THE CASE OF DRED SCOTT. New York: Appleton, 1857. [1], 137pp. Original printed wrappers, stitched. Wraps lightly chipped at extremities, archivally reinforced at spine. Else Very Good.

 

     The fifth and most significant edition. The previous four had issued in 1856; this is the first to include an analysis of the Court's 1857 decision in Dred Scott, and one of the earliest commentaries on that case. Nott calls the decision "utterly and absolutely indispensable."

     Chief Justice Taney liked Nott's review: Taney "had received from Samuel Nott a copy of his pamphlet, 'Slavery and the Remedy,' in a new edition containing a favorable commentary on the Dred Scott decision. Taney's letter of acknowledgement to the Massachusetts clergyman is the most revealing recorded statement of his attitude toward the Negro-- 'this weak and credulous race,' as he put it, whose life in slavery was 'usually cheerful and contented.'" Fehrenbacher, The Dred Scott Case 428. Nott sought whatever middle way could exist in the gathering storm over Slavery, and ended up proposing a Slave Code that eliminated some of its most horrific features but kept the institution intact, all for the sake of Union.

LCP 7236. Dumond 86. Cohen 9864.    (29498)       $350.00

 

206.   [Nullification] Brown, John Thompson: SPEECH OF JOHN THOMPSON BROWN, (OF PETERSBURG,) IN THE HOUSE OF DELEGATES OF VIRGINIA, IN COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE, ON THE STATE OF THE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND SOUTH CAROLINA. DELIVERED JANUARY 5, 1833. Richmond: Thomas W. White, Printer, 1833. 42, [2 blanks] pp. Disbound, lightly to moderately foxed, Good+.

 

     Brown's Speech illustrates the differing reactions, by adherents to the State Rights doctrine, to South Carolina's purported Nullification of the Tariffs of 1828 and 1832. Brown and many other Virginians of the Jeffersonian Strict Construction school refused to support the "catastrophe" of Nullification, which "would bury deep in one indiscriminate ruin, the liberties and happiness of this hemisphere, if not of the whole human family." His Speech is an especially good vehicle for examining those different views, because he was an insightful student of the Constitution.

     Brown explains his objections to Nullification. He acknowledges that the protective tariff is "unequal and oppressive" in its discriminatory effects upon the South; and that its imposition is "odious." Moreover, Tariffs are "a perversion of the spirit and intent of the Constitution." But, thanks to President Jackson's policy to divorce the national government from the manufacturing and banking sectors of the economy, "the days of the Tariff and the American System were already numbered." Nullification was unnecessary, provocative, and dangerous. "It was a fearful thing to see the foundations of government uplifted, and all the elements of social being thrown into wild commotion."

     A thoughtful and thorough lawyer, Brown examines the history of the Union's creation. Emphasizing the sovereignty of each State, he nevertheless concludes, "The Federal compact was not an ordinary treaty...but was an intimate constitutional union, establishing a common government for certain general purposes between the parties. The closeness of the connexion and the mutual dependence of the destinies of the one upon the other, gave rise to some obligations which did not exist in the case of a mere treaty respecting transient interests." He refuses to endorse Nullification, "a snare for the feet of the unwary," which impermissibly claims "a right to dissolve the compact at will and pleasure."

FIRST EDITION. Haynes 2260. Not in Cohen or LCP. OCLC locates ten copies [some of which may be facsimiles] under two accession numbers, as of October 2012.

   (29462)         $850.00

 

207.   [Nullification] Cocke, Charles: FEDERAL RELATIONS. SPEECH OF CHARLES COCKE, DELIVERED IN THE SENATE OF VIRGINIA, IN COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE, ON THE STATE OF THE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE U. STATES AND S. CAROLINA, ON THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1833. Richmond: Printed by Thomas W. White, 1833. 16pp. Disbound, lightly foxed, trimmed closely at the top margin, shaving portions of a few page numbers. Good+.

 

     A rare pamphlet in the literature of Nullification and Virginia's response to South Carolina's attempt to nullify, within its borders, the Tariffs of 1828 and 1832. The conflict placed Virginia in a delicate position: its most prominent attorneys and politicians were of the State Rights, Strict Construction school. Though supporting State Rights, many Virginians considered Nullification an impermissible "revolutionary" measure, unjustified under the circumstances and wholly unsupported by the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of 1798-1799. Cocke asserts that he "can never subscribe to the consolidating doctrine" that a State entering the Union has given up its "natural right of revolution." But Nullification is "novel and mischievous heresy," he explains, doing his best to demonstrate that it is impermissible under the reasoning of the Virginia Theory of the Union.  

AI 18315 [1- ViL]. OCLC 48818555 [2- VA Hist. Soc., U VA] [as of October 2012]. Not in Haynes, Swem, Cohen, LCP.

   (29477)         $750.00

 

208.   [Nullification] Davis, J[ohn] A[nthony] G[ardner]: A LECTURE ON THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF PROTECTING DUTIES, DELIVERED IN THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. BY J.A.G. DAVIS, PROFESSOR OF LAW IN THAT INSTITUTION. Charlottesville: Printed by Cary & Watson, 1832. 24pp, disbound and foxed. Good+. Presentation copy "To J.T. Brown, Esq. from the Author," inscribed in light pencil at head of title. Brown was a Virginia lawyer, member of the House of Delegates, and delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829-1831.

 

     "Davis [1801-1840] was the second professor of law at the University of Virginia. He argues that protective duties are unconstitutional because Congress lacked the 'authority to encourage manufactures.' " [Cohen]  Davis has the intellectual courage to dispute James Madison's arguments that Congress may constitutionally "pass laws for the purpose of encouraging domestic manufactures." In a close examination of Madison's reasoning, Davis counters that Congress's authority over interstate commerce, and to lay and collect taxes and duties, are insufficient to authorize the imposition of tariffs. The result is a sophisticated interpretation, from the perspective of a Jeffersonian Strict Constructionist, of the Constitution.

Cohen 10479. Haynes 4728. AI 12094 [2]. OCLC 6246095 [9]. Not in Harv. Law Cat. or Marke.

   (29449)         $850.00

 

209.   [Nullification] South Carolina: THE REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE CONVENTION OF THE UNION AND STATE RIGHTS PARTY, ASSEMBLED AT COLUMBIA, 10TH DECEMBER, 1832, WITH THEIR REMONSTRANCE & PROTEST. [Columbia, S.C.: 1832]. 11, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, lightly foxed, blank top margin clipped from title leaf. Good+.

 

     A heated denunciation, by a group of distinguished Carolinians, of South Carolina's Ordinance of Nullification. Its "natural consequences are DISUNION AND CIVIL WAR...[W]e cannot regard the threatened destruction of a mild and rational system of liberty, without apprehensions of the keenest anxiety." The Ordinance "has insidiously assailed one of the inalienable rights of man, by endeavoring to enslave all freedom of conscience by that tyrannical engine of power-- a Test Oath," binding the individual first and foremost to the State rather than the United States. The Ordinance violates the Constitution, the rights of the citizen, and "has virtually destroyed the Union, by carefully preventing the General Government from enforcing their laws through the civil tribunal of the country, and then enacting that if the Government should pursue any other mode to enforce them, then this STATE shall no longer be a member of the Union."

     Thomas Taylor was President of the Convention. The four Vice Presidents included Henry Middleton and Richard I. Manning. Pages 10-11 print, in double columns, the names of about two hundred Carolinians, including James Chesnut, Henry DeSaussure, Mitchell King, Daniel and John Legare, C.G. Memminger, Alexander Moultrie, J.L. Petigru, W. Gilmore Simms. Franklin J. Moses [born Israel Franklin Moses] and James Edward Henry are listed as Secretaries of the Convention.      

II Turnbull 285. Sabin 88088. Not in Cohen. OCLC 10815104 [3- U. So. Car., U Va, Duke] [as of October 2012].

   (29451)         $950.00

 

210.   [Nullification] South Carolina: THE REPORTS AND ORDINANCES, OF THE CONVENTION OF THE PEOPLE OF SOUTH CAROLINA. ADOPTED AT ITS SESSION IN MARCH, 1833. Columbia: Printed by A.S. Johnston, Printer to the Convention, 1833. 19, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, title page moderately foxed, Good+. With the light pencil signature of John Thompson Brown, Virginia lawyer, member of the House of Delegates, and delegate to Virginia's 1829 constitutional convention.

 

     South Carolina withdraws, with as much face-saving as possible, its Ordinance of Nullification, which had asserted its power to nullify the Tariffs of 1828 and 1832 within its borders. In response, the Federal government lowered those tariffs, in an effort to avoid armed conflict with South Carolina, which explains here: "Convinced that under the operation of this system the labor and capital of the plantation states must be forever tributary to the manufacturing states, and that we should in effect be reduced to a condition of colonial vassalage, South Carolina felt herself constrained...to interpose in her sovereign capacity the authorities, rights and liberties appertaining to her as a sovereign state." This interposition was necessary to avoid "the regulation of the whole labour and capital of this vast confederacy by a great central Government." Having made its point "beyond what existing circumstances would have authorized us to expect," and without abandoning its principles, it adopts [and prints here] the Ordinance of withdrawal.

     Also printed here are Convention Reports explaining South Carolina's actions; and a "Report, on the Mediation of Virginia," which assisted in engineering the compromise. That Report insists that South Carolina "must stand acquitted, of the charge of having acted with any undue precipitation...in exercising this faculty of her sovereignty" to nullify acts of the federal government.

Cohen 6313. II Turnbull 311. Sabin 87429. OCLC 191249030 [12] [as of October 2012].

   (29457)         $850.00

 

211.   [Nullification] [Tazewell, Littleton Waller]: A REVIEW OF THE PROCLAMATION OF PRESIDENT JACKSON, OF THE 10TH OF DECEMBER, 1832; IN A SERIES OF NUMBERS, ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE NORFOLK AND PORTSMOUTH HERALD, UNDER THE SIGNATURE OF "A VIRGINIAN." Norfolk: Printed by T.G. Broughton, 1833. 74pp. Disbound and lightly foxed, Good+.

 

     Tazewell wrote these Letters at the height of the Nullification Crisis. This is their first separate publication; the pamphlet was reprinted in 1888. Tazewell argues that President Jackson's denial of South Carolina's power to nullify the Tariffs of 1828 and 1832 repudiates "certain propositions that have ever been held (in Virginia, at least) as fundamental truths of constitutional law." Indeed, Jackson's denial and his threat to use force against South Carolina are "political heresies." He appeals to the great Western tradition that Power is always to be exercised in the service of Right, and denounces "the doctrines of the new ultra Federal School, that these States never were sovereign" and that by joining the Union they "surrendered any part of their sovereignty."

     With detailed analysis of legal and constitutional history, Tazewell supports his arguments.

FIRST EDITION. Cohen 6335. AI 21450 [1]. OCLC 9452031 [6] [as of October 2012]. Haynes 18166 and Swem 5473 [citing only the 1888 edition].

    (29456)        $850.00

 

212.   [Nullification] [Turnbull, Robert]: THE CRISIS: OR, ESSAYS ON THE USURPATIONS OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. BY BRUTUS. Charleston: Printed by A.E. Miller, 1827. 166pp. Disbound, early and late leaves with mild to moderate foxing, Good+.

 

     These powerful Essays are dedicated "To the People of the 'Plantation States'... as a Testimony of Respect, for their Rights of Sovereignty." The book consists of 33 Essays, 22 of which were first published in the Charleston Mercury. Turnbull wrote them for the purpose of "vindicating the rights of his native Southern country" which, he argued, had been abused by Northern abolitionists, protectionists, and advocates of "a consolidated national government." Turnbull acknowledges that "My feelings are more sectional than they are national...I believe that to the predominance of these feelings above all others, we are in future to look for the preservation of Southern interests and Southern safety."

     Turnbull's Essays are learned arguments that the national government has exceeded its constitutional powers, and invaded the reserved rights of the States and of the People. He treats the Debates in the Constitutional Convention, decisions of the Supreme Court, the background of the Convention, and significant events in American constitutional law since the Constitution's adoption. He denounces the Missouri Compromise of 1820, asserting that it induced "our slaves" to think "there was a charter of liberties granted them by Congress;" and warning that such conceptions will "light up the fires of revolt...Let it be remembered, that when Congress claims regulation in any way upon the subject of negroes, it assumes the character of the enemy that would invade your country." 

Howes T420. II Turnbull 172. Cohen 6338.

   (29447)         $600.00

 

213.   [Nutt, Lizzie]: LIZZIE NUTT'S SAD EXPERIENCE. A HEART BROKEN, AND A FAMILY PLUNGED IN GRIEF. WRECK AND RUIN! THE SHOOTING AND TRAGIC DEATH OF NOBLE-HEARTED CAPTAIN NUTT, LIZZIE'S BRAVE FATHER, WHO FLINCHED NOT, LIKE A TRUE SOLDIER, TO DIE IN DEFENCE OF HIS DAUGHTER'S HONOR. THE GREAT DUKES TRIAL AT UNION TOWN, PA. FULL ACCOUNT, AND ALL "THOSE TERRIBLE LETTERS." Philadelphia: Barclay and Company, [1883?]. Original blue printed and illustrated wrappers. Stitched. 8 full-page plates, plus rear wrapper illustration of the murder. Pages [17]-79, [1] [as issued]. Light wear, early leaves toned. Good+.

 

     Nicholas L. Dukes, a successful attorney, called off his engagement to Lizzie Nutt; he feared that her reputation was not unsullied. Soon thereafter Captain Adam Nutt, Lizzie's father, confronted Dukes in a misguided defense of his daughter's honor. During a scuffle Dukes shot and killed Captain Nutt. Dukes, pleading self-defense, was acquitted; the jury allegedly contained many of his friends. A few months later James Nutt, Captain Nutt's son, shot Dukes dead. James Nutt was acquitted by reason of insanity.

     McDade notes that, "There are various editions of this work, all with the same title page but with different cover titles." This one, which McDade calls the third edition, has a wrapper title, "The very pathetic and truly remarkable trial of young James Nutt. The avenger of his father's death." Its copyright date is 1883, the year of the murder; McDade's copy was copyrighted 1884. This is a typically sensational Barclay crime pamphlet.

McDade 719.    (29504)          $375.00

 

214.   Odd Fellows: ODD FELLOWSHIP EXPOSED. AN EXPOSITION OF ALL THE SIGNS, TOKENS, PASS WORDS AND GRIPS BELONGING TO THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS, AS PRACTICED IN SAGAMORE LODGE, NO. 9, WITH THE FORM OF INITIATION, AND AN EXPLANATION OF THE FIVE DEGREES. BY AN EXPELLED MEMBER. SECOND EDITION. Exeter: Printed for the Publisher, and for sale by Booksellers Generally, 1845. 12pp, stitched in original printed yellow wrappers. Text untrimmed, with some dusting and light blank extremity wear. Good+ copy of an attractive, entirely unsophisticated pamphlet. With the ownership signature of George Lincoln, in the upper margin of the front wrapper.

 

     A rare revelation of this secret Order's sordid and nefarious rituals, by an expelled member from Sagamore Lodge No. 9, in Exeter, New Hampshire. Having been "basely deceived," he has a duty as a citizen to expose Odd Fellowship, which is "a most fearful enemy to our free and republican institutions." The pamphlet expresses common American fears of secret societies and secret rituals, which threatened the primacy of American democratic institutions. OCLC records a Dartmouth copy with this imprint and title, but without an edition statement.

      A similar pamphlet was printed in New York in 1846, with a slightly different title, promising to expose Odd Fellowship in all its American Lodges.

OCLC 13635086 [1- Dartmouth] [as of 6/12]. Not in American Imprints, Sabin, Eberstadt.

 

   (28908)         $375.00

 

215.   Ohio Enquirer: THE ENQUIRER MANUAL AND POLITICAL REGISTER FOR 1871. Cincinnati: Enquirer Buildings, 247 Vine Street, 1871. Original printed wrappers [bit of wear to inner margin of front wrap] with wrapper title [as issued]. 118pp. Stitched. Very Good plus.

 

     The fourth annual of this Democratic periodical's effort to become "indispensable to every Democrat who pays attention to political events." Its only rival, the New York Tribune Almanac, "is full of obnoxious political matter." Reconstruction politics was a grudge fight; the Enquirer Manual is delighted that Deep South States are being "redeemed from Republican control," and that "the immense negro vote" will soon be outdone by the return of "the disfranchised voters" to the polls.

     This item contains much political information: election statistics in all the States, popular votes for the presidency over the previous thirty years, breaking down votes by towns and cities. In addition, it contains many full-page advertisements, some illustrated, for Cincinnati retailers, manufacturers, and suppliers. 

FIRST EDITION. OCLC 6397059 [7] [the series] [as of September 2012]. Not in Sabin, Thomson, Eberstadt, Decker.

 

   (29298)         $250.00

 

216.   [Olmsted, Gideon]: THE CASE OF THE SLOOP ACTIVE, INCLUDING THE WHOLE OF THE EVIDENCE ADDUCED ON THE TRIAL, THE PROCEEDINGS IN THE COURT OF ADMIRALTY, AND BEFORE THE COMMITTEE OF APPEALS, AND OTHER AUTHENTIC DOCUMENTS CONNECTED WITH THE CASE. Philadelphia: Printed by C. & A. Conrad, Mathew Carey, and Others, 1809. 39, [1 blank] pp. Toned and lightly spotted, bound in a later cloth binding with gilt-lettered morocco spine label. Covers with slight separation from text block. Good+.

 

     During the Revolutionary War, the British took Gideon Olmsted and three other Connecticut citizens as prisoners and impressed them into service of the Sloop Active. Olmsted and his friends seized the Sloop, which was then captured by a Pennsylvania-owned ship. Olmsted and Pennsylvania each claimed the Sloop under laws of admiralty. Predictably, Pennsylvania courts awarded the Sloop to the State. But Olmsted persevered in the federal courts, where he was successful. Pennsylvania ignored the federal mandate. Instead, the ship and its cargo were sold, and the moneys deposited with Rittenhouse, the Treasurer of Pennsylvania.

     Thus the stage was set for a significant early conflict between state and federal authority. In 1809, the year of this publication, the United States Supreme Court decided the issue by upholding the supremacy of federal law. Chief Justice Marshall held that State judicial decisions could not alter or impair rights acquired by virtue of federal court decisions or other federal law. The case was United States v. Peters, 9 U.S. 115 [1809]. Judge Peters, of the Pennsylvania state court, had affirmed Pennsylvania's right to the funds. This item, printed by disappointed Pennsylvanians, reprints a rare 1779 pamphlet [Evans 16220], which includes portions of several depositions omitted from other 1808 and 1809 publications on the subject .

Cohen 11167. OCLC 19440084 [4- U MN Law, Penn Law, Detroit Public Library, Newberry] [as of 6/12]. AI 17163 [7].

   (28967)         $500.00

 

217.   Olney, J.: A NEW AND IMPROVED SCHOOL ATLAS, TO ACCOMPANY THE PRACTICAL SYSTEM OF MODERN GEOGRAPHY... New York: Robinson, Pratt & Co., [1831-1832]. 4to. Original printed yellow wrappers [dirty, edge-worn], stitched [loosening]. Eleven hand-colored maps, including North America, the United States , New England, Middle States with part of the Southern States, Ohio and Indiana. Covers worn, maps Very Good. The maps are dated 1828-1830.

 

     Mexico includes all of California and today's American Southwest; the Oregon and Missouri Territories encompass all of today's Northwest and Upper Midwest; Texas and Arkansas Territories are shown with their then-boundaries.    (29969) $375.00

 

218.   Oregon: THE CONSTITUTION; TOGETHER WITH THE SESSION LAWS OF OREGON, ENACTED DURING THE FIRST REGULAR SESSION OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF OREGON, BEGUN, SEPT. 10, 1860. Salem, Oregon: Asahel Bush, State Printer , 1860. 111, [1 blank], 9, [1 blank], 5, [1 blank], 6, [1], [1 blank] pp [as issued]. Disbound, partly uncut, library label pasted down on blank verso of last leaf, Very Good.

 

     Oregon entered the Union in early 1859 with this Constitution, which was adopted in November 1857. Among its other provisions, "No negro, Chinaman, or mulatto shall have the right of suffrage," nor did any "idiot or insane person." The Constitution included a ratification Schedule, pursuant to which electors would also vote on the question, "Do you vote for slavery in Oregon-- Yes or No?"; and "Do you vote for free negroes in Oregon-- Yes or No?" The voters decided to prohibit both slavery and Free Negroes.

     This document, of great significance in Oregon's legal history, prints the Constitution, the Governor's Proclamation announcing the results of the referendum, Oregon's Act of Admission into the Union "on an equal footing with the other States;" the State's first General Laws, Resolutions and Memorials. An Index appears at the end. Among the Assembly's more interesting enactments is a requirement that "Every Chinaman engaged in mining gold in this State shall pay for such mining privilege the sum of two dollars tax per month." 

Belknap 508. Sabin 57548. OCLC records six locations under several accession numbers [as of November 2012].

   (29542)         $1,250.00

 

219.   Oregon: STATUTES OF A GENERAL NATURE PASSED BY THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF THE TERRITORY OF OREGON: AT THE SECOND SESSION, BEGUN AND HELD AT OREGON CITY, DECEMBER 2, 1850. Oregon City: Asahel Bush, Territorial Printer, 1851. Original sheep [faint institutional stamp, gilt-lettered institutional label at base of spine]. viii, [9]-301, [1 blank] pp. Light blindstamp and rubberstamp on title page, else clean and Very Good. Signature on front cover of H.C. Small who, during the Civil War, would serve as Captain of the First Oregon Cavalry.

 

     The first published collection of Oregon's earliest territorial laws, reflecting the social and political life of the early settlers. It was compiled by Edward Hamilton, Oregon's territorial governor by appointment of President Zachary Taylor, and hence known as the 'Hamilton Code.' The laws were drafted primarily by Judge Matthew Deady. The volume treats a wide variety of subjects concerning the early history of Oregon: the boundary with Great Britain, courts, the Cayuse War, Indian tribes, roads, bridges, taxes, slavery [prohibited], Negroes [prohibited from entering the territory]. The Organic Law [i.e., territorial Constitution], the Act of Congress organizing the Territory, the List of Territorial Officers, the 1846 Treaty with Great Britain establishing Oregon's boundary, and other foundation documents are also printed. Eberstadt calls the book "extremely rare." It is, at least, quite scarce.

Belknap 44. 114 Eberstadt 633. Soliday 616. Not in Cohen.

   (29897)         $1,000.00

 

220.   Owen, David Dale: REPORT OF A GEOLOGICAL EXPLORATION OF PART OF IOWA, WISCONSIN, AND ILLINOIS...IN THE AUTUMN OF THE YEAR 1839; WITH CHARTS AND ILLUSTRATIONS. [Washington]: June 11, 1844. 28th Cong., 1st Sess. SD407. Collated complete: 191pp + 25 maps and plates (many folding, some colored). Disbound, Very Good plus.

 

     The original 1840 printing did not include "the maps and illustrations which are to be found in the later editions and which are of considerable interest. The part of Illinois included is the Galena mining area. Besides much geological and mineralogical information of a general nature, the report contains brief descriptions of each township." Buck. This is the second, revised printing.

Buck 340. Sabin 58008. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Soliday, Graff.   (28835)           $250.00

 

221.   Paine, Thomas: RIGHTS OF MAN: BEING AN ANSWER TO MR. BURKE'S ATTACK ON THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. PART I. [bound with] RIGHTS OF MAN: PART THE SECOND. COMBINING PRINCIPLE AND PRACTICE. London: Symonds, 1792. iv, 78, [1 advt], [1 blank]; vii, [1], [9]-90, [4], [1 blank], [1 advt] pp. Occasional close trimming at the foremargin, but text unaffected. Very Good, in modern cloth. With tasteful bookplate and 'withdrawn' stamp [from Clements Library] on front pastedown

 

     On the first printing of Rights of Man, Gimbel writes, "Paine hoped that this book would do for England what his Common Sense had done for America. He appropriately dedicated it to George Washington, and published it on Washington's birthday, February 22, 1791."

     "On February 16, 1792, Paine published a second part to his Rights of Man, dealing an even stronger blow for a change of government in England...Part the Second fully developed his great political philosophy." Gimbel 66.

Howes P32.   (29412) $600.00

 

222.   Paine, Thomas (Robert Treat): AN ORATION, WRITTEN AT THE REQUEST OF THE YOUNG MEN OF BOSTON, AND DELIVERED, JULY 17TH, 1799. IN COMMEMORATION OF THE DISSOLUTION OF THE TREATIES, AND CONSULAR CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Suffield [CT]: Printed by Edward Gray, 1799. 16pp. Disbound and moderately foxed, Good+.

 

     This is the scarce Suffield imprint of Paine's Oration, printed after the Boston edition of the same year. Unlike the more famous Thomas Paine, Robert Treat was a dedicated Federalist, Anglophile, and Francophobe. Here he predictably denounces "Gallic perfidy," as America's quasi-war with France heated up.

Evans 36031. Trumbull 1217. NAIP w021573 [6].    (29571)           $250.00

 

223.   [Parke, John]: THE LYRIC WORKS OF HORACE, TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH VERSE: TO WHICH ARE ADDED, A NUMBER OF ORIGINAL POEMS. BY A NATIVE OF AMERICA. Philadelphia: Printed by Eleazar Oswald, at the Coffee-House., 1786. XLI, [1 blank], 334, [16] pp, plus frontispiece engraved by James Peller Malcolm-- his first published engraving-- after a design by Peter Markoe. Malcolm was "a young artist, who served but a short time in the business, therefore any inacuracies therein must be imputed to the above cause." Bound in original calf [rebacked early and expertly, with original spine and morocco spine label laid down]. Light wear to the binding, scattered text spotting, Very Good. With contemporary ownership signatures of John F. Ellis.

 

     The first edition and the first American translation of Horace, with 16-page List of Subscribers and the dedication to General George Washington. At page [321], with a separate title, is a poem entitled, "Virginia: A Pastoral Drama, on the Birth-Day of an Illustrious Personage and the Return of Peace, February 11th, 1784." It is purportedly the first celebration in print of George Washington's birthday.

     Evans says, "Henry Stevens calls this 'the rarest and oddest of all American books of poetry.' The translations are in rhymed verse, and paraphrased by the substitution of American public characters for the Roman worthies to whom Horace addressed his Odes, and by allusions to local and contemporary conditions. Four pages are given to the Dedication to Washington; and the scene of The Pastoral Drama [the 4th title] is located at Mount Vernon." The book includes some verse that Parke, a Delaware officer, had composed while at Valley Forge. The "translations" adapt the subject matter to American history, substituting George Washington for the Emperor Augustus. There is also a pastoral drama celebrating the return of peace.

Evans 19717. Wegelin 303.   (29866) $1,250.00

 

224.   Parsons, Joseph: CHRISTIANS MAY AND OUGHT TO BE INFUENCED BY THE RECOMPENCE OF REWARD. THE SUBSTANCE OF TWO SERMONS, PREACH'D FIRST AT BRADFORD, MAY 11TH AND 25TH 1743,4. AND AFTERWARDS, WITH SOME ABBREVIATIONS, IN SOME NEIGHBOURING PARISHES; AND PUBLISHED AT THE DESIRE OF MANY OF THE HEARERS. Boston: Printed by Rogers and Fowle, for S. Eliot in Cornhill, 1744. 30pp, lacking the half title and final blank. Inner margins with several closed tears into text, but text preserved. Final leaf torn at the top margin, but text also unaffected. Toned. Good.

 

     Parsons became Pastor of the First Church in Bradford in 1725; he stayed until his death nearly forty years later.

Evans 5469.   (29667) $250.00

 

225.   Peck & Snyder: PRICE LIST OF OUT & INDOOR SPORTS & PASTIMES. PRICE 25 CTS. New York: Peck & Snyder; Gast. Lith. & Eng. Co., [1885?]. About [300] pp., two double-sided color plates. Attractive chromolithographic stiff wrappers illustrating athletes in different dress, sports equipment [spine partly eroded, small chips and short closed tears to front wrap, large chip to top outer corner of rear wrap with small loss to a few illustrations, wraps and first text leaf separating from spine, tape repair to outer margin]. Stapled. Text with a few scattered spots, else quite clean with many text illustrations. Short closed tear to bound edge of first leaf, first few leaves and last several leaves chewed at outer margin [no text loss]. Good+.

 

     Peck & Snyder was a leading supplier of baseball gear from the 1860s onward, as well as a wide variety of other sporting goods, firemen's supplies, badges, telephones and telegraphs, magic tricks, musical instruments, jews' harps, minstrelsy, and an unusual array of other items. The two color plates depict wigs and related accessories, fencing equipment, and miniature yacht fittings. The verso of one plate contains illustrations of "Negro Wigs" and accessories such as a "Negro Fright Wig," advertised as a "mechanical contrivance for making the hair stand on end;" a "Negro End Men's Wig, with top knot;" a Negro Stump Speech and Comic Wig, a Plain Black Negro Wig, Negro Wench Wig, other "Negro Minstrel Wigs," greasepaint, and more.

OCLC 231761771 [6]. Winterthur 709.    (29484)     $750.00

 

226.   [Pemberton, Israel]: AN ADDRESS TO THE INHABITANTS OF PENNSYLVANIA, BY THOSE FREEMEN, OF THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, WHO ARE NOW CONFINED IN THE MASON'S LODGE, BY VIRTUE OF A GENERAL WARRANT. SIGNED IN COUNCIL BY THE VICE PRESIDENT OF THE COUNCIL OF PENNSYLVANIA. Philadelphia: Robert Bell, 1777. (4), 52pp. Disbound and lightly spotted, a couple of minor blank margin tears, Good+. With ownership signature, 'Sam Elam'.

 

     An item of great significance in the struggle for civil liberty and religious freedom. On religious grounds, Pemberton and other Quakers refused to swear allegiance to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. "These Quakers were imprisoned for security reasons by the Revolutionary Council of Pennsylvania." Howes. "These freemen, principally Quakers, were imprisoned in consequence of their refusal 'not to depart from their dwelling-houses and engage to refrain from doing anything injurious to the United States, by speaking, writing, or otherwise...'" Sabin.

     Pemberton offers a passionate denunciation of their arrests: no warrants charging a specific crime, no opportunity to be heard. The documents and letters are printed here, and Pemberton reviews them in detail.

Howes P191. Sabin 59610. Evans 15496. Adams 77-2b.

   (29060)         $1,000.00

 

227.   Pendleton, [Nathaniel Greene]: MILITARY POSTS- COUNCIL BLUFFS TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN. [TO ACCOMPANY BILL H.R. NO. 465.] MAY 27, 1842. MR. PENDLETON, OF OHIO, FROM THE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS, MADE THE FOLLOWING REPORT:... [Washington: 1842]. 27th Cong., 2d Sess. H.R. Rep. No. 830. 64pp [disbound] + folding map entitled 'Map of the United States Territory of Oregon West of the Rocky Mountains,' by Washington Hood. 42 x 50 cm. Very Good.

 

     The earlier of two reports, preceding the 1843 Report issued in the third session of the 27th Congress. The latter prints the extract from Wilkes's report. Eberstadt's Catalogue 137 offers them both. This Report includes reports from Abert, Totten, Gibson, and Elijah White.

Howes P199aa. 137 Eberstadt 481. Wagner-Camp 100 note. 2 Wheat, Transmississippi West, page 161. Graff 3243 [the 1843 report].   (28832)     $500.00

 

228.   Penn, William: FRUITS OF SOLITUDE, IN REFLECTIONS AND MAXIMS RELATING TO THE CONDUCT OF HUMAN LIFE. THE TENTH EDITION. Philadelphia: Printed by Benjamin Johnson, 1792. 12mo. xi, [9], 166, [2], 86, [2] pp. But pages 85-166 are bound out of order at the end of the book. Separate title page for second title, 'Fruits of a Father's Love...The Eighth Edition.' Light foxing. Bound in 19th century half morocco and blue boards, with decorated spine and title stamped in gilt. Good+. Several contemporary owner inscriptions.

Evans 24663.   (29354)           $275.00

 

229.   [Penn, William; Barclay, Robert; and Pike, Joseph]: THREE TREATISES, IN WHICH THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLE, DOCTRINES, WORSHIP, MINISTRY AND DISCIPLINE OF THE PEOPLE CALLED QUAKERS, ARE PLAINLY DECLARED. THE FIRST, BY WILLIAM PENN, IN ENGLAND; THE SECOND, BY ROBERT BARCLAY, IN SCOTLAND; THE THIRD, BY JOSEPH PIKE, IN IRELAND. Philadelphia: Re-printed by Joseph Crukshank, 1770. [8], 88, vii, [1], 111, [1], 24 pp. Bound in original sheep [rubbed, hinges strong]. Light and occasionally moderate foxing, lacks the rear free endpaper. Good+.

 

     "A brief account of the rise and progress of the people called Quakers...-- The anarchy of the ranters, and other libertines; the hierarchy of the Romanists, and other pretended churches, equally refused and refuted...-- An epistle to the national meeting of Friends, in Dublin, concerning good order and discipline in the church." NAIP. Each of these three treatises has separate title page and pagination, with the first signed separately and the latter two continuously.

Evans 11661. NAIP w029546.   (29874)       $250.00

 

230.   Pennsylvania: STATE OF THE ACCOUNTS OF THE COLLECTORS OF EXCISE FOR NORTHAMPTON COUNTY. Philadelphia: John Dunlap, 1783. [2], 12 pp. Stitched lightly toned, a little mild foxing, untrimmed, Very Good.

 

     The pamphlet prints the Excise Collectors' accounts from July 1775 to June 20, 1782. Long lists of names of persons who paid taxes to Excise Collector George Graff, during this Revolutionary War period. The accounting is signed in type, at the end, by John Nicholson for the Comptroller General's Office, March 29, 1783.

Evans 18115. Hildeburn 4394.    (29111)       $450.00

 

231.   [Pennsylvania Hospital]: THE COMMITTEE, APPOINTED TO PREPARE AN ACCOUNT OF THE MONIES RECEIVED FROM THE LEGISLATURE OF PENNSYLVANIA, TOWARDS ERECTING ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS TO THE PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITAL, AND FINISHING THE SAME, AND OF THE EXPENDITURES OF THE SAID BUILDINGS-- REPORT; [Philadelphia]: Printed by John Fenno, [1797]. Folio Broadside, 8 1/4" x 13 1/2". Several old folds, light blank edge wear. Very Good.

 

     A rare broadside Report, signed in type at the end by Committee Members Thomas Morris, Samuel Clark, Thomas Penrose, and John Dorsey. It is dated from Philadelphia, '12 mo. 18th, 1797.' Samuel Coates was Secretary. Expenses were for work by ironmongers, stone masons, stone cutters, carpenters, painters and glazers, and for beer and other necessaries. Receipts from the loan office and the State Treasurer are also recorded, along with other anticipated expenses and receipts.

Evans 32680. NAIP w024206 [2- AAS, National Library of Medicine].

   (29329)         $1,250.00

 

232.   [Pennsylvania Hospital]: THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO PREPARE AN ACCOUNT OF THE MONIES RECEIVED FROM THE LEGISLATURE OF PENNSYLVANIA, TOWARDS ERECTING AND FURNISHING ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS TO THE PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITAL, AND OF THE CONSEQUENT EXPENDITURES, REPORT,... Philadelphia: Printed by Zachariah Poulson, Junior, [1800]. Folio Broadside, 8" x 13". Light folds [with a single small hole, not affecting text], light dusting, Very Good.

 

     A rare broadside Report, signed in type at the end by Committee Members Samuel Coates, Elliston Perot, James Smith Junr, and Pattison Hartshorne. It is dated from Philadelphia, 'Twelfth-month 22d. 1800.' Samuel Coates was Secretary. Expenses were for work by ironmongers, stone cutters, carpenters, plumbers, bricklayers, plasterers, etc. Receipts from the loan office and the State Treasurer are also recorded, along with a notation of the deficit.

     Shipton & Mooney, recording this item, state that "No copy could be located." Its absence from NAIP suggests a modern view that it issued in 1801.

Evans 38250. Not in NAIP, American Imprints, or on OCLC.    (29330)     $1,000.00

 

233.   Peters, Richard [Reporter of Decisions]: REPORT OF THE CASE OF EDWARD PRIGG AGAINST THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA. ARGUED AND ADJUDGED IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES, AT JANUARY TERM, 1842. IN WHICH IT WAS DECIDED THAT ALL THE LAWS OF THE SEVERAL STATES RELATIVE TO FUGITIVE SLAVES ARE UNCONSTITUTIONAL AND VOID; AND THAT CONGRESS HAVE THE EXCLUSIVE POWER OF LEGISLATION ON THE SUBJECT OF FUGITIVE SLAVES ESCAPING INTO OTHER STATES. Philadelphia: Stereotyped by L. Johnson, 1842. 140pp, light to moderate foxing. Bound in original publisher's cloth [bit of chipping, front hinge starting]. Good+, with W.A. Leary's Bookseller Ticket on front pastedown.

 

     The first edition of "the earliest of the three most important Supreme Court decisions on slavery" [Cover, Justice Accused 166] [the others being Dred Scott and Ableman v. Booth]. It is also the first Supreme Court case construing the Constitution's Fugitive Slave Clause [Article IV Section 2], requiring delivery to the master of his slave who had escaped into another State. With the arguments of counsel, it precedes even the official printing, a measure of public excitement. The case "rivals Dred Scott v. Sandford in historical importance" [Fehrenbacker, The Dred Scott Case 43].

     Prigg was a Maryland professional slave-catcher. He seized Margaret Moran, an alleged fugitive slave, in Pennsylvania; but he had not, as required by Pennsylvania law, obtained a State official's certificate of removal. Pennsylvania indicted him for kidnapping; Maryland extradited him to Pennsylvania, where he was tried and convicted. The issue on appeal was the extent, if any, to which State requirements could alter the Federal constitutional provisions, as elaborated by Congress's Fugitive Slave Act of 1793. The case thus excited an enormous amount of interest.

     Justice Story wrote the Opinion for the Court, Chief Justice Taney concurring, with only one dissent. The Court held that Congress had exclusive power to regulate the rendition of fugitive slaves. Pennsylvania's additional requirement of a certificate of removal was void. The Court also held that slave-catchers had a right of 'self-help': they could seize alleged fugitives without judicial approval. But, the Court held, the federal government lacked power to compel State officials to enforce the Fugitive Slave Act. These disparate conclusions increased already-heightened friction between Slave States-- thus emboldened to pursue self-help-- and Free States, thus encouraged to decline aid to slave-catchers.

Finkelman 61-63. LCP 8466. Sabin 61207.   (30050)            $2,500.00

 

234.   Peterson, C.F.: BLACK HILLS VIEWS| PUBLISHED BY C.F. PETERSON, DEADWOOD, S.D. Omaha, Neb.: Omaha Printing Co., [1907]. [64] pp. Bound in original black publisher's cloth, with gilt-lettered title on front cover. A bit shaken, Very Good.

 

     Two introductory pages of text are followed by rare illustrations of mining and milling operations [including the Homestake Mines near Deadwood, the Terraville Gold Mining Camp], cattle ranching, cowboys, Native Americans, towns and cities [Deadwood, Lead City],  "productive prairie lands," and spectacular scenery.

     From context, this book was published in 1907, the latest date mentioned in the text. Other printings were issued by the firm of Peterson & Carwile. OCLC does not record this one.

Not located in Eberstadt, Decker, Soliday, or on OCLC [as of September 2012].

   (29304)         $500.00

 

235.   Philadelphia: THE ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, AND THE SEVERAL SUPPLEMENTS TO THE ACT OF INCORPORATION, PASSED SINCE THE NINETEENTH DAY OF JULY, IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND NINETY-EIGHT. PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE SELECT AND COMMON COUNCILS. Philadelphia: Printed by Zachariah Poulson, Junior, 1800. Contemporary plain wrappers [spine shorn, front wrapper detached and chipped], stitched, untrimmed, top edge uncut. 46, [2 blanks] pp, as issued; plus supplementary pages 47-70, [2 blanks], consisting of 1801 ordinances. A complete 1800 imprint, supplemented with Ordinances issued and bound in the following year. Expertly repaired closed tear [no loss] at last text leaf. Good+ or better.

 

     To the 1800 printing, pages 47-70-- containing 1801 supplements-- were added. The supplements were unpublished as a separate imprint; they were added to some of the copies of the 46-page printing, with pagination continuous. The Ordinances divide the City into wards, arrange for supplying it with water, regulate the Second Street market, appropriate funds for running the City, and provide for other matters.

     Evans and Shipton note both the 46-page printing and ours, with the supplementary ordinances. The title page of each is identical. 

Evans 38242, 38243. NAIP w000013 [6], as of September 2012 [46 pages].

   (29320)         $750.00

 

236.   [Philadelphia and Erie Railroad]: PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITIZENS OF PHILADELPHIA RELATIVE TO THE RAIL ROAD TO ERIE, AND OF THE CONVENTION AT WILLIAMSPORT, LYCOMING COUNTY, PA. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE DELEGATES. Philadelphia: J. Thompson, 1836. 31, [1 blank] pp, plus folding map frontis, 9 1/2" x 8 1/4". Disbound with scattered foxing, Good+. The map is uniformly toned on thin paper and is in Very Good condition.

 

     The "Map, without title, shows the New York and Erie, the Philadelphia, Northumberland Erie, the Monongahela, and the Baltimore and Ohio railroads, and the Pennsylvania Canal and Railroad." Thomson. Simon Gratz was among the Committee members supporting direct transportation, "by Rail Road or Canal, between the seaboard and Lake Erie, along the West Branch of the Susquehanna." Delegates to the Williamsport convention included Gratz, Nicholas Biddle, and other prominent Philadelphians. The importance of such a route is explained, and the Committee's report on the Convention is printed. 

Thomson 1453. AI 39530 [6] [not collating the map]. Sabin 62082. OCLC 14639156 [11] [as of September 2012]. Not in Modelski.   (29334)     $275.00

 

237.   [Philadelphia Judaica]: LOAN OF THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA| CERTIFICATE NO. 162.| SIX PER CENT LOAN.| THIS CERTIFIES THAT THERE IS DUE TO NATHAN NATHANS, GUARDIAN OF GEORGE AND JOHN LOCKHART BY THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS, WITH INTEREST, AT THE RATE OF SIX PER CENTUM PER ANNUM, PAYABLE HALF YEARLY, ON THE FIRST DAYS OF JANUARY AND JULY. THE PRINCIPAL NOT REIMBURSABLE, WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE OWNER HEREOF, BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF JANUARY, 1892... IN WITNESS WHEREOF, THE TREASURER OF THE SAID CITY HAS HEREUNTO SET HIS HAND, AND CAUSED THE SEAL OF THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA TO BE HEREUNTO ANNEXED, THE TWENTY-SIXTH DAY OF JULY 1854, AND THE CONTROLLER HAS ATTESTED THE SAME ON THE SAME DAY AND YEAR. Philadelphia: Draper, Welsh & Co., [1854]. Folio broadside, 8.75" x 14.75". A beautifully printed bond, with an ornamental border and ten engraved vignettes, including a large one of Independence Hall; and a locomotive, a waterfront scene, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, William Penn, and other portraits. Signed by the City Treasurer and the City Controller [each signature has a circular punch through it]. Blindstamp seal of the City of Philadelphia. Minor wear, Very Good.

 

     The Loan Certificate evidences the indebtedness of the City to Nathan Nathans, as guardian of George and John Lockhart. Nathans [1798-1877], a Jewish Philadelphia attorney, was admitted to the Bar in 1819; in addition to his legal work, he was a controller of the Philadelphia public schools for many years.

Center for Jewish History, Philadelphia City Bonds Collection, PID #364970.

    (29756)        $250.00

 

238.   [Pierce, Charles E.]: MANUSCRIPT MEMOIR OF UNION SOLDIER CHARLES E. PIERCE OF THE 146TH NEW YORK INFANTRY, DESCRIBING HIS CAPTURE AT THE BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS, HIS IMPRISONMENT AT ANDERSONVILLE, AND HIS ATTEMPTED ESCAPE. Annapolis, MD: 1865. Folio, 9" x 13.5". Approx. [250] pp, of which 14 pages contain Pierce's manuscript narrative; several additional pages contain records of the Camp Parole Hospital, Annapolis, Maryland, where Pierce was transferred after his imprisonment at Andersonville; and @150 pages contain accounting records of the ledger's first owners. The Hospital entries include the names of men staying there, their ranks and regiments, and bed and ward counts.  Original brushed leather boards tooled in black and cornered in calf [rubbed, a few stains], gilt-lettered red morocco label and raised spine bands [a few small chips, bottom half of spine eroded], text block lightly shaken. Text pages have minor foxing and spotting, and are in excellent condition. Some later blank pages are chewed at the top margin. A letter from Pierce to his mother, dated 21 May 1865, is laid in, stating his intention of  "writing of my life in the South from the time I was taken prisoner until I came out of Savannah." Also included is Pierce's admittance card to the Soldiers' Reading Room of Philadelphia while a resident of the Episcopal Hospital. Very Good.

 

     Pierce was evidently the final owner of this ledger, which originally belonged to Orne Wilson & Co. of Loudon, Tennessee, as a cash book from 1853 to early 1858. It was then used by R.T. Wilson as an individual ledger. Midway through the ledger, beneath an entry dated May 5, 1863, is an undated inscription by an unknown author, who writes that the ledger was "taken from the city that cradled the rebellion" and given to W.L. Cooper, to be kept in remembrance of the "foulest rebellion ever engaged in by man."  This suggests that the ledger was taken from Charleston. W.L. Cooper's and Charles E. Pierce's signatures are on a front endpaper, each signing as Chief Ward Master of the Camp Parole Hospital at Annapolis. 

     Charles E. Pierce [@1837-1909] was a private in Company I of the 146th New York Infantry from October, 1862 through May, 1865. His memoir begins in Virginia on the morning of May 5, 1864, preparing for the Battle of the Wilderness. After waiting two hours for the order to attack, Pierce and his unit charged the Confederate line. After much fighting and sending "many a Reb to his long home," the 146th's ranks had thinned; they began to fall back. As the 146th retreated, Pierce was "halted by one of those leaden mesingers, I fell, & received three more wounds in quick succession". He lay on the field with "the ded and dying making rather a sad sight." In the next few days, he had no food and water, and the Rebels attempted to "draw out the Yankees." Late in the afternoon of May 8, after giving up on assistance from anyone, Pierce "got two guns & made them supply the place of crutches" and started off; he didn't make it far before fainting by a tree. Rebels put him in a lumber wagon and took him to hospital, which he described as "a hill in the woods, no shelter but the trees." While lying at the foot of an oak tree, he heard the familiar voice of his friend George Wheeler; Pierce used his injured left arm "to drag myself along" the one hundred feet to Wheeler's side; this "took most of that forenoon to accomplish..."  Pierce got a "Reb" to tear up some pieces of tent Pierce had found close by to use as bandages; Pierce bound a gun stock to his thigh, dressed his arm, and then tended to Wheeler, who had  "one of his ribs sticking out...through the flesh." Pierce tried to put the rib back: "by the first try I made I hurt him bad but it soon got numb with swelling  so I just put it back all right & got a bandage over the wound & he felt better soon." The two men then fell asleep but Pierce was awakened "when I felt some one pulling my foot I looked up & there saw a nigger as black as you please pulling off my shoe I did not speak to him very kindly as I saw he was trying to steal them." Pierce woke up Wheeler, who pulled out an unloaded carbine and frightened the thief away. "The next morning another came along & asked me if I had a watch or ring to sell." Pierce sold him his watch for some whiskey & seventy five dollars in "confederate trash." Pierce laments the 33 1/2 cent discount on the bills and that he lost most of the worth of the watch because the farmers, who "must have had a pretty poor opinion of their cause,"  wanted greenbacks instead of Confederate money.

     Over the next several days, Pierce and Wheeler tried to keep their wounds clean, to subsist on one meal a day [crackers and water], and later corn meal rationed at one pint daily for two men. Pierce did a bit better after being sent to the commissary to keep the accounts of the doctor in charge; but soon the prisoners were sent to Orange Court House and then Gordonsville, Virginia. At a stop at a church, Pierce befriended a little boy whose Yankee mother gave him and Wheeler "as much chicken and biscuits as could fill their pockets." From Gordonsville Pierce, Wheeler, and the other prisoners journeyed by train to Charlottesville, where "a great many colored people gathered to see the Yankees" until an old man called to the crowd "that if the nigers did not leave their in fifteen minutes they would get put into the stocks" and whipped. The next stop was Lynchburg, where the men were bounced between different hospital units; one, described as filthy, had 84 men in a room 40 feet long by 20 feet. The men were required to take turns standing up so others could lie down to sleep. They then went to Danville, Columbia, Augusta, Macon, and finally to Andersonville. They traveled by train, packed tightly into hot crowded cars and receiving little or no food and water.

     Finally arriving in Andersonville, Pierce states, "here we found the most filthy and sick looking men I ever saw I never will forget the thoughts I had on entering that prison I made up my mind that I had done all the soldiering I would do in this world." He found some of his regiment there. They were soon moved to a new stockade, via a route of deep mud. Pierce was up to his armpits in it; and some of the men got stuck in the mud and died. The prisoners went a week with no tents; but the tents, once erected, made life even more unpleasant: twenty -one straight days of rain caused the water to pool in the tents. They lay in mud with no blankets under them. They were given corn meal most of the time. Occasionally they received some beans and bacon, "but there was two bugs to one bean & five magets to one ration of bacon that was as large as angle worms in the northern states." The men were put to work digging wells with "half of canteens & other tools," and they had to dig 80 feet deep before finding water. He notes, "there was great danger of them caving in there were several covered up in these wells alive & they could never be dug out for the tools we had would take... days"; there were few that would risk it, for "they did not like the idea of being buried alive."  Some prisoners "got so tired of living that they would walk across the dead line... to get shot by the guard... it was very seldom they got back alive for if one of the guard shot a Yankee he got a furlough for thirty days..." 

     Eventually, Pierce and his comrades attempted an escape. "If we ever expected to get out of the Southern (Confederacy) now was the time... there was no cannon... only two fences... & the guard was boys from sixteen to eighteen years old & we could drive them all from their posts in two minutes..." They rushed the lower line of guards and set off into the woods. They tore up railroad tracks along their escape route, and broke the telegraph wire so that their flight would not be broadcast. They made for the Big Pee Dee River, where they broke into smaller groups. Pierce took three men with him; they made a raft with boards and logs, bound together with grapevine, to navigate the river. A Negro warned them of cavalry on their trail, so they kept to the woods and swamps. After seventy-two miles with almost no food and water, they stopped to rest. Pierce looked for food at a nearby farmhouse. He found some "good people" there who promised them food if they returned that night; when Pierce went back to tell his men, one of them had cut his own throat and died. The "helpful" farmer betrayed Pierce, and they were taken away by Rebel soldiers. The farmer said, "we had better not come to his house when we were trying to get away for he would get us caught every time he said he was no fool."

     Pierce returned to prison but was given a Parole of Honor after taking the appropriate oath. He was transferred to the Camp Parole Hospital, working as a clerk assisting with the paroling out of soldiers.

     The signature of  "Chas. P. Holahan, Sergt. 19th Penna. Cavalry, 'Greirson's Raiders', 609 North 11th St. Philadelphia" appears on a front endpaper, but we do not know if he ever possessed the ledger. Holahan asserted, in a suit which he brought in the U.S. Court of Claims, that he had been taken prisoner in Mississippi and transferred to Camp Parole on March 5, 1865. [Charles P. Holahan v. The United States. No. 16983. 30 Ct. Cl. 115]. 'Grierson's Raid' was a cavalry raid from mid-April to early May 1863, as part of the Vicksburg Campaign.    (28901)            $22,500.00

 

239.   Pilmore, Joseph: THE BLESSINGS OF PEACE: A SERMON, PREACHED IN CHRIST'S CHURCH, NEW-YORK, ON THE FOURTH OF JULY, 1794. AT THE JOINT REQUEST OF THE TAMMANY SOCIETY OR, COLUMBIAN ORDER, AND THE SOCIETY OF MECHANICS. New York: John Buel- For the Society., 1794. 32pp, disbound [with later stitching], light wear, else Very Good.

 

     The New York minister preaches an early and "ardent" July 4th sermon, celebrating American independence and the thriving American republic.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 27525.

   (30035)         $250.00

 

240.   [Porter, William Augustus]: AN ARGUMENT ON BEHALF OF THE DEFENDANTS, IN THE CASE OF ISAAC SHELBY, A CITIZEN OF KENTUCKY, VERSUS JOHN BACON, ALEXANDER SYMINGTON...CITIZENS OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA. SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. DECEMBER, 1850. Philadelphia: King & Baird, Printers, 1851. Contemporary plain wrappers. 35, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, lightly foxed, wrappers a bit dirty with a closed tear. Good+.

 

     Porter, representing the Trustees of the dissolved Pennsylvania Bank of the United States, opposed Henry Clay in the U.S. Supreme Court. Shelby was a Kentucky creditor of the insolvent Bank, which assigned its assets for the payment of its debts under the laws of Pennsylvania. Shelby disputed the Pennsylvania court's settlement of the Bank's claims, and challenged the settlement in federal court. The issue was whether the federal court could take jurisdiction of the case and overturn the State court's judgment. The Court held that federal courts were expressly granted jurisdiction to hear cases involving diversity of citizenship, that no ruling of a State could divest them of that jurisdiction; and that the State court's jurisdiction could not, in any event, extend beyond that State's boundaries. The case is reported at 51 U.S. 56 [1850].

Cohen 11234.

   (29551)         $350.00

 

241.   [Porter, William D.]: MR. DOUGLAS AND THE DOCTRINE OF COERCION, TOGETHER WITH LETTERS FROM HON. HERSCHEL V. JOHNSON, OF GEORGIA, AND HON. J.K. PAULDING, FORMER SEC. OF NAVY. READ AND SEND TO YOUR NEIGHBOR. [Charleston: 1860]. 24pp, disbound with scattered foxing. Good+.

 

     Headed 'Tract No. 2,'  this item is one of the '1860 Tracts' expressing South Carolina's eagerness to dissolve the Union. It explains why Senator Stephen A. Douglas, presidential candidate of the northern branch of the now irretrievably splintered Democratic Party, is an enemy of the South. Written during the 1860 presidential campaign, the pamphlet publicizes Douglas's recent assertion that Lincoln will almost certainly be elected, and his argument that resistance to Southern secession, by force if necessary, is the duty of patriots. This pamphlet insists upon "the sovereign character of the States", denounces the "theory that we are one nation-- one consolidated people," musters the appropriate legal arguments, and urges secession if Lincoln is elected.

     This issue differs slightly from the pamphlet catalogued by Turnbull, which is headed, '1860 Association Tract  No. 2' , and whose title does not mention the Paulding Letter.

III Turnbull 318 [ref.].   (28944)         $450.00

 

242.   Preston, William P.: AN ARGUMENT IN THE CASE OF THE UNITED STATES VERSUS PHILEMON T. HERBERT, TRIED FOR THE MURDER OF THOMAS KEATING. DELIVERED IN THE CRIMINAL COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, ON THE TWENTY-FOURTH OF JULY, 1856: ... TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY P.B. TEMPLETON, STENOGRAPHER. Washington: C. Alexander, Printer, 1856. 37, [3 blanks] pp. Stitched in original printed blue wrappers [separated from text block]. Very Good.

 

     "Herbert, a Congressman from California, had ordered breakfast at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C., telling the waiter to be 'damn quick.' This man being too slow, he called to Keating, who told him, 'You have one servant waiting on you and that's enough.' With a few words more Herbert shot him dead. He was acquitted on the second trial after a disagreement on the first." McDade. One witness said that Herbert had exclaimed, "You damned Irish son of a b----, get us some breakfast." Herbert had moved to California from his native Alabama. Later he served in the Confederate Army and was killed in action in 1864.

FIRST EDITION. McDade 471. 241 NUC 0297066 [3]. BEAL 12689. Not in Marke, Harv. Law Cat., Rocq, Cowan. OCLC shows twelve locations under two accession numbers [as of 6/12].

   (28963)         $375.00

 

243.   Price, Richard: OBSERVATIONS ON REVERSIONARY PAYMENTS; ON SCHEMES FOR PROVIDING ANNUITIES FOR WIDOWS, AND FOR PERSONS IN OLD AGE; ON THE METHOD OF CALCULATING THE VALUES OF ASSURANCE ON LIVES; AND ON THE NATIONAL DEBT. TO WHICH ARE ADDED, FOUR ESSAYS ON DIFFERENT SUBJECTS IN THE DOCTRINE OF LIFE-ANNUITIES AND POLITICAL ARITHMETICK. ALSO, AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING A COMPLETE SET OF TABLES; PARTICULARLY, FOUR NEW TABLES, SHEWING THE PROBABILITIES OF LIFE IN LONDON, NORWICH, AND NORTHAMPTON; AND THE VALUES OF JOINT LIVES. THE SECOND EDITION, WITH A SUPPLEMENT, CONTAINING ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS AND TABLES. London: Printed for T. Cadell, in the Strand, 1772. [xv], [1], 404pp. Original calf [hinges starting, some cover erosion] gilt lettered black morocco spine label. Bookplate on front pastedown. Text clean and bright. Overall, Good+.

 

     Price's work established his pre-eminence in insurance, annuities, mortality data, actuarial studies, and probability theory. This printing includes Price's supplemental report, with statistical information, on "the much greater difference between the probabilities of life in great country towns and in country parishes, than is commonly suspected." It also contains his supplemental essay on the "Schemes of the Societies for providing Annuities for Widows, and for Persons in Old Age." His Introduction states, "Upon the whole, A great part of this work is, I believe, new; and I am in hopes also, that it will be found to contain some improvements in those branches of philosophical enquiry, which are the subject of it."

Kress 6894. ESTC T12983.    (29342)            $750.00

 

244.   Price, Richard: OBSERVATIONS ON THE NATURE OF CIVIL LIBERTY, THE PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENT, AND THE JUSTICE AND POLICY OF THE WAR WITH AMERICA. TO WHICH IS ADDED, AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING A STATE OF THE NATIONAL DEBT, AN ESTIMATE OF THE MONEY DRAWN FROM THE PUBLIC BY THE TAXES, AND AN ACCOUNT OF THE NATIONAL INCOME AND EXPENDITURE SINCE THE LAST WAR. [Philadelphia] London Printed, 1776 : Philadelphia: re-printed and sold by John Dunlap, [1776]. 71, [1 blank] pp, with page 71 numbered correctly. Fore-edge untrimmed. Stitched into later stiff plain paper wrappers [some loosening, spine chipping]. Light scattered spotting, Good+.

 

     "The encouragement derived from this book had no inconsiderable share in determining the American colonists to declare their independence." Church. It "ranks next to Paine's Common Sense as the most often reprinted work of its time. It is said to have had considerable influence on the drafting of the Declaration of Independence." Decker. This is one of the earliest of the 1776 American printings.

     Price adopts the Natural Rights theory of Liberty, and its axiom that government exists by the consent of the governed. "There is nothing that requires more to be watched than power. There is nothing that ought to be opposed with a more determined resolution than its encroachment." From this perspective, he opposes England's War with America; and answers authoritatively each British argument favoring the War. Price also absolves the Colonists of responsibility for African Slavery. "It is not the fault of the Colonies that they have among them so many of those unhappy people. They have made laws to prohibit the importation of them; but these laws have always had a negative put upon them here because of their tendency to hurt our Negro trade."

Howes P586. Evans 15031. Adams, American Independence 224u. Hildeburn 3450. Sabin 65452. Church 1137 and 31 Decker 21 [London].

   (29078)         $3,000.00

 

245.   Quimby, W. Fred: ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE OF CANVAS AND LEATHER SPORTSMEN'S GOODS, MANUFACTURED BY W. FRED. QUIMBY & CO., 291 BROADWAY, N.Y., P.O. BOX 1016. New York: O'Keefe & Shiegley, Book and Job Printers, [1880s-early 1890s]. 26, [1], [1 blank] pp, illustrated. Original illustrated and printed pink [some discoloration, small chips and edgewear], stapled as issued. Text lightly toned, small stains in last few leaves from rear wrapper color bleeding into text [touches upon text but text remains legible]. Good+.

 

     This rare trade catalogue contains descriptions, prices and illustrations of quality sporting goods. In addition to Quimby's well known leather, corduroy and waterproof canvas coats, he also offers vests, shoes and boots, leggins, rifle and ammunition cases, pistol holders, metal plated dog collars, reel cases and tackle boxes. This catalogue is most likely dated in the 1880s or early 1890s, as his business is advertised in the 1892 Sportsman's Directory at the address listed in this catalog; by 1897 he had moved down the street. [SPORTSMAN'S DIRECTORY AND YEAR BOOK, 1892, inside back cover; SPORTING LIFE, VOL. 28, NO. 19, JAN. 30, 1897.]

Not in Romaine or Winterthur. Not located on OCLC.    (29847)    $250.00

 

246.   Randolph, Edmund: REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. READ IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, DECEMBER 31, 1790. [Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Childs and John Swaine, 1791]. [2], 34pp. Folio. Disbound, two rubberstamps on blank portion of title page, widely scattered foxing, else Very Good.

 

     Randolph prepared this seminal report, the first by an Attorney General and a foundation document of American jurisprudence, at the request of Congress "to suggest any defects existing in the judiciary system." Although he deferentially analyzes the Judiciary Act of 1789, he observes that, "I have been compelled to question the fitness of some of its leading features."

     Randolph reviews the scope of Federal and State court jurisdiction. In which areas should the jurisdiction of federal courts be exclusive of, and which concurrent with, state courts? His masterful analysis is based "on the vital principles of the Union," in order to "maintain the harmony of the federal and state judiciaries." He particularly considers the United States courts' appellate jurisdiction, and its exercise over the judgments of the highest tribunal of a State. He urges minimizing the circuit duties of Supreme Court justices, a "separation of the supreme judges from the circuit service," with a fundamental analysis of the role of that Court in the organization of the judiciary and the life of the Nation. "Should the judges of the supreme court become stationary, they will be able to execute reports of their own decisions, and thus promote uniformity through the whole judiciary of the United States."

     After further analysis, Randolph proposes a bill to divide the federal judiciary into districts and circuits, provide for their administration, and delineate areas of exclusive federal jurisdiction and original and appellate jurisdiction. Finally, Randolph includes several pages of notes, elaborating on his proposals. Randolph's ideas gained favor by a process of accretion, bearing fruit in later sessions of Congress.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 23908. Cohen 1054. Sabin 67816. Reardon, Edmund Randolph 194-196.

   (29083)         $6,000.00

 

247.   [Raymond, Henry J.]: THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. APPEAL OF THE NATIONAL UNION COMMITTEE TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES. HEADQUARTERS OF THE NATIONAL UNION COMMITTEE, ASTOR HOUSE, NEW YORK, SEPT. 9, 1864. New York: 1864. Broadsheet, signed at the end in type by Raymond [as Chairman] and twenty other men from the Loyal States; dated September 9, 1864. One horizontal fold, a couple of light spots, Very Good.

 

     "Every rebel in arms and every rebel in office,- every rebel organ in the rebel States or in foreign lands,- every hater of Democratic Freedom and the Rights of Man, longs and labors for the overthrow of the Administration and the expulsion of ABRAHAM LINCOLN from the Presidential chair." This broadsheet attacks the Democrats' 1864 Chicago Convention, which "gives a silent approval of the Rebellion itself, and an open condemnation of the war waged for its suppression. Without a word of censure for the conspirators who plotted the Nation's death, it brands with unsparing denunciation the patriots and heroes who defend its life."

     A no-holds-barred attack on the Democratic Party as a bunch of traitors, and a defense of "the lion-hearted citizen-soldiers of the Republic" and their commander-in-chief, Abraham Lincoln.

Not in Sabin, Bartlett, Monaghan.   (29054)  $650.00

 

248.   [Reichel, Edward H.]: AN HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE CHURCH AND MISSIONS OF THE UNITED BRETHREN, COMMONLY CALLED MORAVIANS. ALL PROFITS FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE MISSIONS. Bethlehem Pa.: Printed by J. & W. Held, 1848. Original printed wrappers with decorated borders, stitched. 93, [11] pp. Contemporary ownership signature ['Moravian Male Academy'] on front wrapper, about Fine.

 

     A beautiful copy of this important work on the history of the United Brethren or Moravians. Their history is recounted from the early 15th century, and is followed by a series of tables "of the Missionary Stations and Preaching Places which the U. Brethren formerly had among N. American Indians," operations in Europe, "List of the Congregations of the United Brethren," "List of Bishops of the Renewed Brethren Church," "Boarding Schools under the charge of the Brethren," and "Anniversary of Memorial Days."

Howes R160. Sabin 68984.    (28969)            $500.00

 

249.   Republican Party in Tennessee: THE REPUBLICAN PARTY IN TENNESSEE REORGANIZED. TO THE REPUBLICANS OF TENNESSEE AND THE UNITED STATES. MEMORIAL, RESOLUTIONS AND PROCEEDINGS HAD AT A CONVENTION HELD AT THE CAPITOL, NASHVILLE, FEBRUARY 16TH, 1870, TOGETHER WITH THE SPEECHES OF HONS. A.J. FLETCHER AND J.O. SHACKELFORD. [Nashville: 1870]. 24pp, stitched, somewhat dusted. Else Very Good.

 

     The Civil War was especially bitter in Tennessee, and the aftermath of Reconstruction reflected the continuing strife. The Convention sought to "place the Republican army of Tennessee in condition to make a bold and successful resistance to the rapid and unblushing efforts of a rebel Democracy to strike down all that remains to protect those who loved and dared help maintain the Union when it was in danger." The Convention urges all Union Men "in every county to defeat the nefarious schemes of a horde of States Rights Democrats." The Rebels continue "subverting all that is left of Republicanism in the Constitution and laws of the State."

     Speakers denounce the Klan, "a vast secret organization...nightly riding over the country in masks and shrouds, butchering, in cold blood, at the hour of midnight, the unoffending citizens, and such acts either suppressed or grossly misrepresented and directly or indirectly justified."  

Allen 7270. OCLC records six locations, only one of which is in Tennessee [Knox County Public Library], under two accession numbers, as of March 2013.   (29963) $350.00

 

250.   Riell, Henry E.: AN APPEAL TO THE VOLUNTARY CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES, FROM ALL NATIONS, ON THE EXERCISE OF THEIR ELECTIVE FRANCHISE, AT THE APPROACHING PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. New York: Published at the Office of the Evening Post, 1840. 16pp. Stitched, untrimmed, and generously margined. A bit of edge and blank margin wear, lightly dusted, Good+.

 

     Riell was a New York customs-house officer and an affiliate of Tammany Hall; he assisted with thousands of naturalizations, and was an active proponent of immigration. Here he urges naturalized Americans to vote against the Know-Nothings, a "bigoted" and "parricidal faction" seeking to overturn the naturalization laws; they belong to the Whig Party, the heir to the Federalists' "atrocious" Alien Act of 1798. By contrast the Democratic Party believes that the United States "is destined, both politically and physically, to be the free asylum for the oppressed and the distressed of the universal world."

Sabin 71303. AI 40-5770 [5].    (28878)        $250.00

 

251.   [Roosevelt, William Emlen]: ROOSEVELT V. NEWETT. A TRANSCRIPT OF THE TESTIMONY TAKEN AND DEPOSITIONS READ AT MARQUETTE, MICH. (PRIVATELY PRINTED). [New York: 1914]. 362pp. Original brown pebbled cloth with gilt title on front board and spine. Bookplate of  'Mr. W. Emlen Roosevelt | 804 Fifth Avenue' on front pastedown. Typed letter signed by Theodore Roosevelt to Albert Shaw, one of the witnesses, dated June 7th, 1913 [light wear to outer edge], laid in, written one week after the close of the trial, thanking Shaw for his testimony and stating he "shall have all that testimony put out in a little pamphlet to meet this thing once and for all." Shaw was the author of "The Cartoon Life of Theodore Roosevelt". Our offering was evidently Shaw's copy: he annotates his testimony on pages 288-289. No doubt a limited edition that was most probably in the one hundred copy range and sent to all the witnesses, who numbered fewer than forty. Near Fine. 

 

     The compiler of this trial transcript and the author, W. Emlyn Roosevelt, was Theodore's cousin, close friend, lifelong political supporter and financial adviser, and prominent New York City banker. George Newett, a Michigan Republican and editor of the Iron Ore in Marquette County, located in the Upper Peninsula, had charged that TR was a drunken, profane liar. Emlen, deeply offended, published this trial transcript privately, in book form, for TR's witnesses after the victory in TR's libel suit. Emlen writes "To My Fellow Witnesses": "We have all been greatly incensed...by reports that Theodore Roosevelt was a drinking man. We, who knew the unusual purity and wholesomeness of his life, felt special anger at this rumor, both because of its persistence and of its cruel falsity... I have had this book printed because we all wanted to have a complete copy of the official record which contradicts the libel." TR's witnesses, listed here at page  comprised a formidable array: Admiral Dewey, Jacob Riis, William Loeb, Lyman Abbott, General Leonard Wood, Gifford Pinchot, and more than thirty others, including Emlen himself.

     Having failed to wrest the 1912 Republican presidential nomination from President William Howard Taft, Theodore Roosevelt broke with his Party and ran on the Bull Moose Ticket. Newett blamed Roosevelt for splitting the Party. After Roosevelt spoke in Marquette on October 9th, 1912, Newett published a charge that Roosevelt lied, cursed, and was often drunk. Roosevelt sued; his many witnesses gave convincing denials. Roosevelt won. Newett read a prepared statement in Court retracting his claims: "I am forced to conclude that I was mistaken." Although the trial cost Roosevelt more than $40,000, he asked the Judge for the smallest award possible -- a mere six cents.

   (30023)         $6,500.00

 

252.   Russell, William: THE HISTORY OF AMERICA,  FROM ITS DISCOVERY BY COLUMBUS TO THE CONCLUSION OF THE LATE WAR. WITH AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE PRESENT UNHAPPY CONTEST BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND HER COLONIES. BY WILLIAM RUSSELL, ESQ. OF GRAY'S-INN. London: Printed for Fielding and Walker, 1778. 4to. Two volumes, in matching modern half red morocco [raised spine bands, gilt-lettered and -decorated spine]. 51 maps and plates, as issued [17 maps, 34 plates]. One map backed with linen, two others with minor conservation. A beautiful, unusually attractive and complete set of this significant work. iv, 596; 629, [3] pp. Near Fine.

 

      The first volume is largely devoted to Latin America, and the second to North America. The "late war" of the title is actually the French and Indian War, which ended in 1763. However, the work was updated before publication with a lengthy "Appendix to the History of America." Most of the 220 Appendix pages are devoted to the early years of the American Revolution, up to the 1778 Treaty with France. The Revolution was viewed as a struggle to determine "whether France or Great Britain shall give law to America." Among the many attractive plates is a fictitious portrait of Washington (Hart 740).

Adams, American Controversy 78-94a. Howes R539 ("aa"). Palau 282969. Sabin 74383.

   (29480)         $7,500.00

 

253.   Scheel, Heinrich Otto: A TREATISE OF ARTILLERY, CONTAINING A NEW SYSTEM, OR THE ALTERATIONS MADE IN THE FRENCH ARTILLERY, SINCE 1765. TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH OF M. DE SCHEEL. Philadelphia: Printed for the War-Office, by John Ward Fenno, 1800. [5], 4-154, [6], [1 errata], [1 blank] pp. Disbound, loosening, else Very Good.

 

     Jonathan Williams was the Translator of this detailed essay on the alteration, manufacture, and fabrication of field pieces; gun carriages, cartridges, etc. There are two states of Gathering A: in this copy, the last word of the second line on page [4] is 'English.' A second volume, consisting of plates, is apparently a separate imprint and not offered here. AAS's copy is also unaccompanied by the plates.

Evans 38467. Rink 2177. Sowerby- Jefferson Library 1161. NAIP w028358 [10].

    (29986)        $2,250.00

 

254.   [Sewall, Stephen]: AN HEBREW GRAMMAR, COLLECTED CHIEFLY FROM THOSE OF MR. ISRAEL LYONS, TEACHER OF HEBREW IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE; AND THE REV. RICHARD GREY, D.D. RECTOR OF HINTON, IN NORTHAMPTONSHIRE; TO WHICH IS SUBJOINED A PRAXIS, TAKEN FROM THE SACRED CLASSICS, AND CONTAINING A SPECIMEN OF THE WHOLE HEBREW LANGUAGE: WITH A SKETCH OF THE HEBREW POETRY, AS RETRIEVED BY BISHOP HARE. Boston, New-England: Printed by R. and S. Draper, for the Honourable and Reverend the President and Fellows of Harvard-College, 1763. [2], v, [1], 83, [1 blank] pp, with the half title. Original marbled paper over boards, rebacked in calf with modern gilt-lettered spine label on red morocco. Scattered light foxing and toning, lacks front free endpaper. Very Good, with much Hebrew text.

 

     The second Hebrew grammar printed in America. Rosenbach says, "The Hebrew types used in its printing were destroyed by fire in January, 1764." Stephen Sewall (1734-1804), a graduate of Harvard College, replaced his teacher Judah Monis-- the author of the first Hebrew grammar printed in America--in teaching Hebrew at Harvard in 1761. From 1764 to 1785 he served as Hancock professor of Hebrew and other Oriental languages. Josiah Quincy, in The History of Harvard College, writes, "Professor Sewall was the most distinguished classical scholar, at that period, among the alumni of the seminary, and, considering his opportunities, his knowledge of Oriental language was extensive." John Quincy Adams wrote to John Adams on 21 May 1786, "He [Sewall] was obliged to resign, because, it was said he was addicted to drinking. He most sacredly declared, at the Time, that the accusation was false."

FIRST EDITION. Evans 9514. Rosenbach 43. Goldman, Hebrew Printing in America 172.

   (26676)         $3,500.00

 

255.   Seward, William H.: ARGUMENT OF WILLIAM H. SEWARD, IN DEFENCE OF ABEL F. FITCH AND OTHERS, UNDER AN INDICTMENT FOR ARSON, DELIVERED AT DETROIT, ON THE 12TH, 13TH AND 15TH OF SEPTEMBER, 1851. PHONOGRAPHICALLY REPORTED  BY T.C. LELAND. Auburn: 1851. 64pp, stitched in original printed wrappers. Wrappers a bit edge-chipped, else a clean and Very Good text. 

 

     Seward was counsel to Fitch, allegedly the "chief conspirator" in a plot to sabotage the Michigan Central Railroad, whose newly built and unfenced line had killed cattle and other livestock grazing onto the Road's right-of-way. "The railroad, instead of trying to mitigate the controversy, acted in a high-handed manner," and brought suit after the burning of its freight house in Detroit. [Greenly]. Fitch and others, arrested for the crime, were denied bail; he died in jail during his trial. This piece presents Seward's compelling jury argument; it was also printed in Detroit in the same year.

Cohen 12146. Not in Sabin or Eberstadt.   (30010)   $250.00

 

256.   Sierra Leone Company: SUBSTANCE OF THE REPORT OF THE COURT OF DIRECTORS OF THE SIERRA LEONE COMPANY, DELIVERED TO THE GENERAL COURT OF PROPRIETORS, ON THURSDAY THE 26TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1795. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE DIRECTORS. Philadelphia: Printed by Thomas Dobson, 1795. 12mo. 24pp. Light uniform toning, loose [formerly stitched], Good+.

 

     The Sierra Leone Company was established in 1791 by an impressive array of abolitionists-- including Granville Sharp and William Wilberforce-- to establish a colony on the west coast of Africa for runaway slaves who had found asylum in London. The Company's Reports are all difficult to obtain. This fourth Report recounts in detail the "calamity which has been sustained by the Colony at Sierra Leone, through the depredations made by a French Squadron, which has very lately and unexpectedly appeared in that quarter."

Evans 29514. LCP 9415.    (29676)   $850.00

 

257.   [Smith, Provost William et al.]: FOUR DISSERTATIONS, ON THE RECIPROCAL ADVANTAGES OF A PERPETUAL UNION BETWEEN GREAT-BRITAIN AND HER AMERICAN COLONIES. WRITTEN FOR MR. SARGENT'S PRIZE-MEDAL. TO WHICH [BY DESIRE] IS PREFIXED, AN EULOGIUM, SPOKEN ON THE DELIVERY OF THE MEDAL AT THE PUBLIC COMMENCEMENT IN THE COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA, MAY 20TH, 1766. Philadelphia: Printed by William and Thomas Bradford, 1766. x, viii, 12, [2], 112 pp. Later half calf with marbled boards and gilt-lettered spine title [worn, front board detached, rear joint cracked but holding]. Light scattered foxing. Heavy staining in margins, touching a few words of text on final few leaves but text remains legible, else Good+.

 

     An eight-page List of Subscribers precedes the Preface and Smith's Eulogium. "Smith made the presentation address at the delivery of the prize medal. The dissertations were by John Morgan, Stephen Watts, Joseph Reed and Francis Hopkinson" [Howes], the latter a future Signer of the Declaration of Independence. John Morgan won the prize offered by John Sargent in this essay contest, held in the wake of the repeal of the Stamp Act. Provost Smith was acutely aware of the "truly delicate and difficult" timing of the Dissertations, when "misunderstanding had untwisted all the cords of that Union, and the minds of many were too much inflamed."

     "Mr. Sargent was a Bristol merchant who had given the money for the medal instead of making a contribution to the support of the college when asked by Smith during a fund-raising trip to England.  Sargent specified that union with Great Britain was to be the topic of the dissertation" [Adams]. The prize was given at the 1766 commencement of the College of Pennsylvania, now the University of Pennsylvania.

Adams, American Independence 40a. Evans 10400. Howes S691 ("aa"). Hildeburn 2213.

   (29567)         $1,500.00

 

258.   Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts: A BOUND VOLUME OF EIGHT SERMONS, EACH A SEPARATE IMPRINT, PREACHED BEFORE THE INCORPORATED SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN FOREIGN PARTS, AT ITS ANNIVERSARY MEETINGS IN 1755, 1758, 1759, 1761, 1762, 1765, 1766, 1767. London: 1755-1767. Bound in quite attractive contemporary or early 19th century half morocco, marbled boards, marbled endpapers, and raised spine bands. 'Sermons' stamped in gilt on spine. Bookplate of Paul Beilby Thompson [1784-1852], the first Baron Wenlock, an English Whig and Member of Parliament during the late 1820's and the 1830's. Pages 80; 77, [1]; 99, [1]; 88; 91; 119, [1]; 68, [1]; 98, [1] pp [each, as issued]. A lovely set, in Near Fine condition [tear to one blank margin on the 1767 Sermon, and spotting on a couple of its leaves].

 

     The Preachers, listed chronologically, are Thomas Hayter [1755], James Johnson [1758], Anthony Ellis [1759], Richard Newcome [1761], John Hume [1762], Philip Yonge [1765], William Warburton [1766], John Ewer [1767]. In addition to their Sermons, the pamphlets print the Society's Charter, its Proceedings over the preceding year, names of members and donors; the names of the Society's missionaries in Canada, the American Colonies, and the West Indies, with their narrative reports on their work, including conversions of Indians and Negroes; and a list of the Bishops and Deans who have preached before the Society beginning in 1701. The form of a bequest to the Society is usually printed at the end. Anthony Ellis's 1759 Sermon appears to be especially scarce; OCLC records only an incomplete copy at the Corporation of London Libraries, as of January 2013

     The Society's efforts in the American colonies aroused great resentment among some leading American clergy, particularly Charles Chauncy and Jonathan Mayhew, who viewed its activities as attempts to establish the Church of England in the New World and to destroy the democratic organization of American churches. Their resistance during the 1760's paralleled political developments which would produce the American Revolution.

     Certainly the Sermons reflect the high-water mark of British self-assurance. Bishop Hume describes "the real state of the multitudes-- a set of thoughtless, illiterate, untutoured, creatures." Warburton's 1766 Sermon, "a statement of British manifest destiny..." [Gephart], dismisses objections of non-Episcopalians to the Society's mission: Americans suffer from the "outrageous folly" of "Freethinking." They are "a People, where wealth and Civil Faction, have, as usual, inflamed religious zeal." And the Society of Jesus has "immerged themselves in the worst part of civil intrigues." At the same time, he and his colleagues unequivocally denounce "the infamous traffic for Slaves," which "directly infringes both divine and human Law." They are "endowed with all our Faculties, possessing all our qualities but that of colour; our BRETHREN both by Nature and Grace."

FIRST EDITIONS. HAYTER: ESTC T47758. JOHNSON: Goldsmiths' 9409. Sabin 36223.  ELLIS: OCLC 24422790 [1- incomplete] [as of January 2012]. NEWCOME: Sabin 54938. ESTC N23710.  HUME: ESTC N37286. Goldsmiths' 9804. YONGE:  Adams, American Controversy 65-28. WARBURTON: Adams, American Controversy 66-61. Sabin 101276. Blockson 8984. Gephart 10084. EWER: Adams, American Controversy 67-5.

   (29803)         $5,000.00

 

259.   Society of Friends: A COLLECTION OF SOME WRITINGS OF THE MOST NOTED OF THE PEOPLE CALLED QUAKERS, IN THEIR TIMES. COLLECTED TOGETHER, IN ORDER THAT SUCH WHO PROFESS THAT WAY NOW MAY COMPARE THEIR SENTIMENTS WITH THOSE OF THEIR FOREFATHERS, AS THEY TERM THEM, OR SUCH AS WERE DEEMED WORTHY ANCIENTS, WHOSE WRITINGS HAVE BEEN APPROVED OF BY THE SOCIETY IN GENERAL. Philadelphia: Printed [by W. and T. Bradford] for the Compiler, 1767. iv, 5-34pp. Stitched, untrimmed, generously margined, uncut. Lightly toned, mildly foxed, a couple of contemporary margin corrections. Very Good in its unsophisticated state.

 

     The writings concern the question of Quakers' obligation to pay a tax to the Pennsylvania colonial government . The Introduction is signed in type, 'M.M.'

Evans 10583. Hildeburn 2288.    (29066)       $500.00

 

260.   Somers Mutiny: CASE OF THE SOMERS' MUTINY. DEFENCE OF ALEXANDER SLIDELL MACKENZIE, COMMANDER OF THE U.S. BRIG SOMERS, BEFORE THE COURT MARTIAL HELD AT THE NAVY YARD, BROOKLYN. New York: Tribune Office, 1843. 30, ii pp. Disbound and moderately foxed, Good+.

 

     One of several accounts of this gripping tale. Mackenzie, brother of John Slidell (later the Confederate diplomat), "was known as Alexander Slidell until 1838, when, under authorization of the New York legislature, he added Mackenzie to his name out of regard for a maternal uncle." DAB. Commander of the Brig Somers, which trained apprentices, he sailed in 1842 for the Africa Squadron. During the passage, plans for a mutiny were discovered, with the intention of killing the officers and converting the ship into a piratical vessel.

     Mackenzie ordered the execution of three persons, including Philip Spencer, for their alleged participation. Spencer was the son of John Spencer, President Tyler's Secretary of War. The incident created a storm of controversy. This document is Mackenzie's defense, which was successful: he was absolved of wrongdoing in carrying out the executions. The two-page Appendix at the end "is an exact copy of the paper found in Mr. Spencer's razor-case." It is in Greek. The translation, which also appears here, is evidence of the conspiracy.

Sabin 43421. II Harv. Law Cat. 13. Cohen 13563. AI 43-3187 [5].

   (29289)         $275.00

 

261.   South Carolina: THE ADDRESS OF THE PEOPLE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, ASSEMBLED IN CONVENTION, TO THE PEOPLE OF THE SLAVEHOLDING STATES OF THE UNITED STATES. PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE CONVENTION. Charleston: Evans & Cogswell, Printers to the Convention, 1860. 16pp, disbound without wrappers, else Very Good.

 

     This call to arms, prepared by the fire-eater Robert Barnwell Rhett, is, according to Harwell, the earliest Confederate imprint. It chronicles the "discontent and contention" between North and South "for the last thirty-five years," caused by "the aggressions and unconstitutional wrongs, perpetrated by the people of the North on the people of the South." Today the United States government, once a "government of confederated republics," is now "a Despotism." Rhett argues that the "Southern States, now stand exactly in the same position towards the Northern States, that the Colonies did towards Great Britain."

     Rhett urges likeminded southerners to join with South Carolina by seceding from the Union. "It cannot be believed, that our ancestors would have assented to any Union whatever with the people of the North, if the feelings and opinions now existing amongst them, had existed when the Constitution was framed. There was then, no Tariff-- no fanaticism concerning negroes." He urges them "to be one of a great Slaveholding Confederacy..."

FIRST EDITION. Harwell, Cornerstones of Confederate Collecting 1. Crandall 1865. Parrish & Willingham 3749. III Turnbull 294. Streeter Sale 1269. Sabin 87432. II Nevins 239.   (26780)            $1,500.00

 

262.   South Carolina: PROCEEDINGS OF THE DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION, COMPOSED OF DELEGATES FROM THE SEVERAL DISTRICTS AND PARISHES OF THE STATE OF SOUTH- CAROLINA, ASSEMBLED AT COLUMBIA, ON THE 22D MAY, 1843. Columbia: Printed at the "South Carolinian" Office, 1843. 21pp. Disbound, moderately toned or foxed, wrapper remnant in inner margin. About Good+.

 

     Whitemarsh Seabrook was President of the Convention, whose attendees are listed here. The Convention was called in order to nominate "JOHN CALDWELL CALHOUN to the first office in the gift of the American people." An Address of the Convention of South-Carolina to the Democratic Republican Party of the United States, printed here, calls Calhoun the only man who can reverse "the deplorable condition of the country." Calhoun "belongs to a portion of the Union which has never yet had a President;" nor has the Union had a President from one of "the smaller and weaker States." "Next to Mr. Jefferson, no one who has lived under our Constitution has done more to preserve its republican features, by exposing the dangers of consolidation, and resisting its encroachments."

FIRST EDITION. II Turnbull 486.   (29630)            $450.00

 

263.   South Carolina: REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, OF SOUTH CAROLINA, ON SO MUCH OF THE MESSAGE OF HIS EXCELLENCY GOV. JAS. H. ADAMS, AS RELATES TO THE SLAVE TRADE. Columbia, S.C.: Steam Power Press, Carolina Times., 1857. 48pp. Disbound, else Very Good.

 

     The Report demonstrates the Lower South's desire to resurrect American participation in the international slave trade. This wish rejected the consensus that had characterized American society-- for both moral and economic reasons-- since the founding of the Republic: Congress had barred, without significant objection, American participation in the international slave trade in 1808, the first year in which it was constitutionally permitted to do so.

     South Carolina now wants to reinstate it. This Report explicitly calls African slavery "an essential element in our domestic and social systems...[It] is unalterably interwoven with our destiny." Its authors ridicule the "new mania" that "All men are created equal." Defiantly raising the banner of Nullification, the Report suggests that, regardless of the federal constitutional prohibition, South Carolina may do as it pleases. It rebuts the notion that the slave trade is immoral, urges Carolina's representatives in Congress to advocate reopening the trade, and engages in lengthy legal analysis.

III Turnbull 241. Sabin 87521.    (29631)       $500.00

 

264.   South Carolina: REPORTS ON THE FREE SCHOOL SYSTEM, TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, AT THE REGULAR SESSION OF 1839. Columbia: A.H. Pemberton, State Printer, 1840. 88pp, disbound, with light to moderate spotting. Good+.

 

     The Committee on Education defends South Carolina's Free School system from charges that it "is a failure," although it acknowledges that "there are many defects; but these defects are rather in the administration of the system, than in the system itself." Included is the "Report of Professors Elliott and Thornwell, on the free school system," which cites as a major difficulty "the carelessness of the poor about the education of their children, the selfishness which leads them to prefer their labor to their improvements, and the foolish pride, which prevents them from receiving that as a bounty, which they cannot procure in any better way." Also printed are district-by-district reports, replete with data and suggestions on attracting students, qualified teachers, salaries, certifications, curriculum, buildings. 

II Turnbull 444. AI 40-6240 [5].   (29629)     $450.00

 

265.   [South Carolina Pharmacy]: AIMAR'S NEUROTIC OIL, FOR NEURALGIA, RHEUMATISM, PAINFUL SWELLINGS, SPRAINS, &C. PRICE 25 CENTS. AIMAR'S PEARL CEMENT, FOR MENDING CHINA, GLASS, EARTHENWARE, FURNITURE, LEATHER, ETC. PRICE, 25 CENTS. SOLD BY GOODRICH, WINEMAN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS, HAYNE STREET, G.W. AIMAR, CORNER KING AND VANDERHORST STREETS, CHARLESTON, S.C. [Charleston: 1860s]. Broadside, 10" x 7.5", in a variety of bold typefaces. Attractive, rare, and Very Good.

 

     Aimar's was a legendary South Carolina pharmacy, established in 1852. When it closed in 1978, the Smithsonian purchased its contents. It had evidently been the oldest American drugstore in continuous operation. It opened in a handsome multi-story building at King and Vanderhorst, built in 1808, where it remained as a family business for 125 years. During the Civil War the building served as a dispensary and hospital for the Confederacy while its owner, George W. Aimar, was a lieutenant in the Lafayette Artillery.

Not in Hummel, Turnbull, NUC. OCLC 277086555 [1- U. Rochester Med. Ctr., dating its copy 1850-1860]. The South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina owns two copies, which it dates 1869.

   (29018)         $500.00

 

266.   Spanish-American War Songster: AUG. 13 1898. SOUVENIR | SONG BOOK | 25 ORIGINAL SONGS AND POEMS WRITTEN BY MEMBERS OF THE 8TH ARMY CORPS. Manila: Lit. of Carmelo y Gavermann, 1898. 36pp. Stitched in attractive multi-colored title wrappers, with illustration of Screaming Eagle and American and Philippine flags. Text toned, else Very Good. With bookplate on blank verso of title leaf of A.L. Johnston, and a 1959 letter laid in from Edwin H. Carpenter, Jr., stating, 'I don't know who A.L. Johnston was- his library was sold at Butterfield & Butterfield's...'

 

     The offerings include 'Dewey, King of the Sea'; 'Battle Songs of Utah'; 'On the Decks of the Peking'; 'Nebraska's Battle Song.' And many others

OCLC locates eleven copies under two accession numbers, the majority in California and Oregon [as of March 2013].   (29970)          $250.00

 

267.   Spratt, L.W.: A SERIES OF ARTICLES ON THE VALUE OF THE UNION TO THE SOUTH, LATELY PUBLISHED IN THE CHARLESTON STANDARD. BY...ONE OF THE EDITORS. Charleston: Printed by James, Williams & Gitsinger, 1855. iv, 39, [1 blank] pp. Disbound with light to moderate spotting, Good+

 

     Spratt, an ardent Southern separatist, argues "that slavery is in fact the germ of a living and an enduring form of society"; that "we are not behind the North in any department of material progress; there is a peace and a repose in our social system which is not enjoyed by any other people, and it is directed by the most cultivated intelligence and is tempered and controled by a singularly elevated spirit of morality." In these eight Articles he explains "the sufficiency of the South for an independent government."

Howes S845. III Turnbull 210. Sabin 89749.   (29627)         $450.00

 

268.   Stanley, A. & T.W. : STANLEY'S METER-DIAGRAM: ILLUSTRATING THE METRIC SYSTEM. WITH EXPLANATIONS, TABLES OF LENGTH, SURFACE, CAPACITY, AND WEIGHT, RULES, APPROXIMATE EQUIVALENTS, &C. New Britain, CT: A. & T.W. Stanley; Printed by The Case, Lockwood and Brainard Co. of Hartford, Conn., on Artificial Parchment manufactured by Crane & Co., Dalton, Mass. , [1876?]. 4.25" x 5.5". Original stiff paper wrappers with gilt lettering [light edgewear], folded. Inside the wrappers is a meter rule that folds out to 40" long. On the recto are illustrations of two rulers, side by side, measuring 36" and 100cm in length. Beneath the rulers are explanations of the metric system and its units, as well as several tables of  measures. Very Good.

 

     The verso has an advertisement for the Centennial Exhibition at Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, from May 10  to November 10, 1876. Several pictures of the Centennial Buildings and the commemorative medal are included, with some facts about the Exposition and featured buildings.

OCLC 48248333 [2-Yale Univ., Hagley Mus. & Libr.]   (29983)     $375.00

 

269.   Stiles, Joseph C.: CAPT. THOMAS E. KING; OR, A WORD TO THE ARMY AND THE COUNTRY. BY REV. JOSEPH C. STILES, D.D. Charleston, S.C. [i.e., Atlanta]: The South Carolina Tract Society. J.J. Toon & Co., Printers, Atlanta, Ga., 1864. 16mo. 56pp, stitched in original printed wrappers [blank rear wrapper chipped, and addressed to someone in Covington, Tennessee]. Moderately foxed and toned, Good+.

 

     Stiles, born in Savannah but educated at Yale, was a Presbyterian evangelist in Georgia, Florida, and Kentucky. Before the War, he was a vocal opponent of the effort to expel slaveholders from the Church, a movement that closely followed a similar split in the Methodist Episcopal Church. Stiles argued that slaveholding was not a sin per se; and that sinfulness depended upon the conduct of the master towards the slave.

     Captain King, a resident of Roswell, Georgia, was killed at the Battle of Chickamauga. This eulogy-- lauding Captain King, the Southern Cause, and "the ever gallant conduct of the volunteer soldier"-- includes quotes from Captain King's battlefield diary.

Parrish & Willingham 9350. Not in Bartlett.

   (29434)         $500.00

 

270.   Stock, John Edmonds: AN INAUGURAL ESSAY ON THE EFFECTS OF COLD UPON THE HUMAN BODY. SUBMITTED TO THE EXAMINATION OF THE REV. JOHN EWING, S.T.P. PROVOST, THE MEDICAL PROFESSORS AND TRUSTEES, OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE, ON THE 12TH DAY OF MAY, 1797. Philadelphia: Printed by Joseph Gales, 1797. [1], iii, 43, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, toned with light foxing, Good+.

 

     Stock dedicates this pamphlet to Benjamin Rush. He was an Englishman who also wrote theatrical criticisms for the Port Folio in 1801-1803. He later wrote Medical Collections on the Effect of Cold as a Remedy [London: 1806]; and Memoir of Thomas Beddoes [Bristol: 1811]. See, Ellis: Joseph Dennie and his Circle, University of Texas Studies in English No. 3 [1915], page 159. Like most academic production, this learned Essay is abundantly footnoted.     

Evans 32883. Austin 1829.   (30021) $450.00

 

271.   Storrs, Augustus: ANSWERS OF AUGUSTUS STORRS, OF MISSOURI, TO CERTAIN QUERIES UPON THE ORIGIN, PRESENT STATE, AND FUTURE PROSPECT, OF TRADE AND INTERCOURSE, BETWEEN MISSOURI AND THE INTERNAL PROVINCES OF MEXICO, PROPOUNDED BY THE HON. MR. BENTON. Washington: Gales & Seaton, 1825. 14, [2 blanks] pp. Toned and disbound, Good+. 18th Cong., 2d Sess. Document [7].

 

     "A highly important document describing the Santa Fe Trail trade. It affected directly the phenomenal increase in trade which was described later in detail by Josiah Gregg." [Graff] This is a series of 22 questions [from Benton] and answers [by Storrs, who writes from Franklin, Missouri in November 1824]. A Dartmouth graduate, Storrs moved to Franklin as a young man. In 1824 he "joined a trading expedition to Santa Fe. His answers to Senator Benton's questions describe the route, the character of the country, the trade, the condition of New Mexico, and Indian depredations upon the traders. His report appeared when agitation for a road to Santa Fe and for military protection of the caravans was just beginning." [Wagner-Camp]

     "One of the earliest first-hand accounts." [Eberstadt] "A report that he furnished to Thomas Hart Benton on caravan trade proved to be most useful." [Handbook of Texas].

Wagner-Camp 29. 112 Eberstadt 457. Graff 3998. Streeter Sale 154.

   (28815)         $450.00

 

272.   [Stow, Joshua]: REPORT OF THE CASE OF JOSHUA STOW VS. SHERMAN CONVERSE, FOR A LIBEL; CONTAINING A HISTORY OF TWO TRIALS BEFORE THE SUPERIOR COURT, AND SOME ACCOUNT OF THE PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT OF ERRORS. New Haven: Printed by S. Converse, 1822. [1], 3, [3 blanks], [5]-183 [i.e., 179] pp, with erratum at bottom of page 3. Stitched and untrimmed. Uniformly toned, scattered foxing, else Very Good.

 

     "Stow, a Republican judge, charged Converse, the editor of the Connecticut Journal, with libel in declaring him to be an infidel. The jury found Converse guilty and awarded Stow $500. The judge declared the damages insufficient and the jury reconsidered and awarded $1,000, which the court accepted. Converse requested a new trial which the Supreme Court granted. The retrial in Superior Court resulted in a $750 award which the jury refused to increase when sent out to reconsider. The Supreme Court then denied the defendant's motion for another trial. That denial is reported at 4 Connecticut Reports 17." Cohen.

     The trial was an outgrowth of the "strong political feelings" of the time, as the Introduction observes. Connecticut politics exhibited extraordinary bitterness between Republicans and Federalists. Stow, who had also been Middletown's postmaster and tax collector, supported Thomas Jefferson in 1800, and resented the Federalists' efforts to place the Congregational Church at the center of political life. Stow actively supported the 1818 State Constitution's disestablishment of the Church; Federalists thus called him an infidel. "If the future historian of Connecticut would thoroughly understand the real genius and political spirit of the times in which we live, he will find more of them embodied in this pamphlet than in any other authentic document with which we are acquainted." 

Cohen 12059.    (29050)         $650.00

 

273.   Stroud, George M.: A SKETCH OF THE LAWS RELATING TO SLAVERY IN THE SEVERAL STATES OF THE UNITED STATES IN AMERICA. SECOND EDITION, WITH SOME ALTERATIONS AND CONSIDERABLE ADDITIONS. Philadelphia: 1856. xii, 125 pp. Stitched in original printed wrappers. One fox spot in blank upper margin of early leaves. Very Good.

 

     This Philadelphia judge's book, normally found in cloth rather than wrappers, is an essential reference for the library on slavery. It analyzes the law of slavery in each State, including the mid-Atlantic region; and reviews constitutional provisions bearing on slavery. It substantially updates the first edition, which issued in 1827, to reflect the sea-change in Southern thinking, which now regarded slavery as a positive good rather than a necessary evil. Issued at the height of the Kansas-Nebraska controversy, its new material on slavery in the territories, the fugitive slave laws, and slavery's interference with the First Amendment is particularly significant.

     "The legal literature of antislavery is of several sorts. One category...is that of descriptions of slave codes and their administration. The purpose of these works was to use slave law as data, credible data, as to the realities of slavery. The first, and in many ways the best of these works was" this item. [Cover, Justice Accused].

LCP 9947. Sabin 93097. Cover 149. Dumond 106. Cohen 9879.   (30029)  $450.00

 

274.   Sulzberger, Mayer and Dropsie, Moses A.: APPEAL FROM COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, NO. 3, OF PHILADELPHIA COUNTY. JULY, 1878. NO. 4. PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COMPANY, APPELLANTS, VS. LOMBARD AND SOUTH STREET PASSENGER RAILWAY COMPANY, APPELLEES. PAPER BOOK OF APPELLEES. MAYER SULZBERGER, MOSES A. DROPSIE, FOR APPELLEES. [Philadelphia: 1878]. 15, [1 blank], [17]-22, [2 blank] pp. Original printed wrappers [rear wrapper nearly detached], first 15pp stitched, separately printed Appendix [pages (17)-22] tipped in. Final blank has tear. Very Good.

 

     Dropsie was a prominent Philadelphia lawyer, author, philanthropist, entrepreneur, railroad promoter, President of Gratz College, and leader of Philadelphia's Jewish community. Sulzberger came to Philadelphia from Baden at the age of 15, was admitted to the Bar at the age of 21, practiced law with Dropsie, and became a Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in 1895. He, like Dropsie, was an active leader of Philadelphia's large Jewish community; he would serve as executor of Dropsie's estate.

     Here the two lawyers collaborate, representing the Lombard and South Street Passenger Railway Company in litigation against the Goliath Pennsylvania Railroad Company. The Pennsylvania Railroad had torn up the Lombard Railway's tracks and built tracks for itself; Dropsie and Sulzberger argue that the Lombard had no authority to do so.

Not located on OCLC as of December 2012.

   (29614)         $275.00

 

275.   Summer, Henry: SUGGESTIONS RELATIVE TO THE FREE SCHOOL SYSTEM IN SOUTH CAROLINA. Columbia, S.C.: A.G. Summer, State Printer, 1847. 16pp. Disbound with some spotting, Good+.

 

     Summer served in the South Carolina legislature when he wrote this pamphlet, as a member of a Special Committee charged with bringing "a higher standard of education" in Carolina. He argues that the State should "do more, much more than she has ever yet done for the cauwse of education amongst the poor, and amongst the people at large." Competent teachers are required, not only for the usual subjects, but for the pupils' "moral instruction" as well. He sets forth a proposed curriculum and laments, "There is scarce a State in the Union, in which so great apathy exists on the subject of the education of the people, as in the State of South-Carolina." 

     General Sherman's troops burned Summer's home during their 1865 final march; Summer barely escaped being hanged at their hands.

III Turnbull 45. OCLC 24340112 [3- UNC, Trinity, U Chicago], as of March 2013.   (29964)       $250.00

 

276.   Susquehanna Canal Company: AT A MEETING OF THE GOVERNORS AND DIRECTORS OF THE MARYLAND SUSQUEHANNA CANAL, HELD AT THE CANAL, ON THURSDAY, THE 28TH MAY, 1795, RESOLVED, THAT SAMUEL HUGHES, GEORGE GALE, AND JOHN HOLMES, BE EMPOWERED AND REQUESTED TO CONCERT WITH THE CITIZENS OF PENNSYLVANIA, OR SUCH PERSONS AS THEY MAY THINK PROPER TO APPOINT, THE MOST ELIGIBLE MODE OF REMOVING THE OBSTRUCTIONS AND IMPROVING THE NAVIGATION OF THE RIVER SUSQUEHANNAH, AND MAKE REPORT OF THEIR PROCEEDINGS... [Annapolis?: Frederick Green?, 1795]. Folio, a single leaf folded to 8" x 12 1/2". [2], [2 blank] pp. Page [4] addressed for mailing to 'Samuel Bryson Esqr, Mifflin County.' Old folds, final blank with several tears, small tear from seal remnant [minor effect on portions of a couple of letters], else Very Good.

 

     Samuel Bryson, the addressee, was a Mifflin County judge; he was also a county lieutenant of militia. In that capacity he refused to commission two colonels who had been elected by their regiments. In 1791 a furious mob tried to drag him from the bench. The exciting story is told in Franklin Ellis's HISTORY OF THAT PART OF THE SUSQUEHANNA AND JUNIATA VALLEYS EMBRACED IN THE COUNTIES OF MIFFLIN..., Chapter II. Philadelphia: 1886.

     This rare Report of the Canal Company is located, according to NAIP and Rink, only at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. It is not at AAS. The Resolution is followed by a 'Circular' dated May 29, 1795, from the Office of the Canal in "Maryland." It emphasizes the "immense importance [of] the navigation of the river Susquehannah," the "many and great advantages flowing from the partial improvements that have been made," and the even greater benefits that will accrue from "an easy, uninterrupted communication with the Chesapeake." Seeking political support and financial assistance, the Circular rebuts the objections of the "timid" and those who fear that the Canal's progress will "deprive them of the employment and support they at present draw, from conveying your produce by land to market."

Evans 29032. Minick 262. NAIP w032346 [1]. Rink 4534 [1].

   (29331)         $3,000.00

 

277.   Tennent, Gilbert: THE LATE ASSOCIATION FOR DEFENCE, ENCOURAG'D, OR THE LAWFULNESS OF A DEFENSIVE WAR. REPRESENTED IN A SERMON PREACHED AT PHILADELPHIA DECEMBER 24, 1747. Philadelphia: Printed by William Bradford, [1748]. 46, [1- errata], [1 blank] pp. Lightly toned, lightly foxed, lacking the half title. Bound in later half morocco and cloth [front cover detached]. Good+.

 

     A rare, early American imprint. A second edition, without the errata page and also quite scarce, was published in the same year. A Presbyterian minister and a leader in the Great Awakening, Tennent and his friend Benjamin Franklin sought the aid of the "Quaker-dominated Assembly regarding the threatened large-scale plundering of Pennsylvania settlements along the Delaware River, especially near the City of Philadelphia, by French and Spanish privateers" [Miller 417]. The Association for Defence, a volunteer militia, was Franklin's brainchild. This Sermon provides the religious justification for opposing by force such unprovoked attacks; Tennent gives the Association for Defence his whole-hearted support.

     Tennent dedicates his Sermon "To All that have join'd in the late Association for Defence," as well as to the officers of the Commonwealth and the City of Philadelphia. His purpose is to demonstrate "the divine Approbation of lawful War." Unlike the Quakers, Tennent urged that it was "lawful to oppose by Force unjust Invaders." Otherwise, "Men of the strictest Integrity, as well as Females of the most unblemished Virtue, will ever be exposed as an easy Prey to the vilest Insults of the most scandalous Scoundrels!" He argues that banishing the right of self-defense, "so far from promoting Peace, would rather contribute to the utter Ruin of the human Race."     

FIRST EDITION. Evans 6244. Hildeburn 1102. NAIP w005382 [4].

   (30027)         $3,000.00

 

278.   Texas Bar Association: PROCEEDINGS OF THE TEXAS BAR ASSOCIATION AT ITS ORGANIZATION SESSION, HELD IN THE CITY OF GALVESTON, JULY 15 AND 17, 1882 WITH THE OFFICERS, STANDING COMMITTEES,  AND ROLL OF MEMBERS FOR THE YEAR 1882. Galveston: Printed by Order of the Association, 1882. Original printed wrappers and original staples. 24pp. Light wear, Good+. [offered with] PROCEEDINGS OF THE FIRST AND SECOND ANNUAL SESSIONS OF THE TEXAS BAR ASSOCIATION HELD IN THE CITY OF GALVESTON, DECEMBER 12, 1882 AND IN HOUSTON, DECEMBER 14, 1883. WITH THE CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS, ALS, OFFICERS, STANDING COMMITTEES AND ROLL OF MEMBERS FOR THE YEAR 1884. Houston: 1884. Original printed wrappers, stitched, 85pp. Very Good.

 

     These two pamphlets record the beginnings of the Texas Bar Association. Several hundred Texans are listed as members, and all its founding documents are printed.

   (30046)         $250.00

 

279.   [Thomas, Isaiah]: THOMAS'S MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, RHODE- ISLAND, NEWHAMPSHIRE & VERMONT ALMANACK, WITH AN EPHEMERIS, FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1796. Worcester, Massachusetts: Isaiah Thomas, [1795]. 12mo. [48] pp. Stitched, cut of an angel on the title page, woodcuts corresponding to calendar months. Lightly toned, lightly foxed, untrimmed. Very Good. Ownership inscription in foremargin of title page: "The Property of Amos Pope 1795." Pope [1772-1837]issued his own almanacs in Boston during the 1790s. See, e.g., Drake 3507. Occasional contemporary margin notes.

 

     With a 'Lawyer and Justices' Calendar,' an essay on Slander, court schedules, "Clean Cellars Necessary to Health," tables of interest and currencies, Friends' Meetings, the New French Calendar and material on the French Revolution, and tables of distance.

Evans 29624. Drake 3557.

   (29179)         $350.00

 

280.   [Thompson, Matilda G.]: THE CHILD'S ANTI-SLAVERY BOOK: CONTAINING A FEW WORDS ABOUT AMERICAN SLAVE CHILDREN, AND STORIES OF SLAVE-LIFE. TEN ILLUSTRATIONS. Boston: American Tract Society. 28 Cornhill., [1859]. 158, [2 publ. advts.] pp. Bound in original cloth, stamped in blind [covers dirty, faded]. Text lightly foxed, all illustrations present. Good+.

 

     Disclaiming any intention to suggest that all slaveholders are bad, "we equally dread sthe danger of having any child grow up in the belief that slavery is not an enormous evil-- a wrong to the slave, and a sin against God. We send out this little volume in the hope that it may do something to awaken the sympathies of the young for the oppressed..." The stories reflect the horrors of American Slavery. The book was also printed, evidently simultaneously, by Carleton and Porter in New York.

LCP 2292. Dumond 38 [NY printing]. As of March 2013, OCLC locates four copies [AAS, Williams, Library Co., Huntington] under two accession numbers.

   (29979)         $450.00

 

281.   Thornwell, Rev. J.H.: REPORT ON THE SUBJECT OF SLAVERY, PRESENTED TO THE SYNOD OF SOUTH CAROLINA, AT THEIR SESSIONS IN WINNSBOROUGH, NOVEMBER 6, 1851 | ADOPTED BY THEM, AND PUBLISHED BY THEIR ORDER. Columbia, S.C.: Steam-Power Press of A.S. Johnston, 1852. 16pp. Disbound, lightly spotted, Good+.

 

     Thornwell, whom Appleton calls "one of the ablest men that the south has ever produced...and in politics advocated extreme southern views," justifies slavery biblically and as a humane labor system, especially compared with the wage slaves of the North. But, recognizing that the non-slaveholding States are increasingly hostile to such views, he expresses "the gloomiest forebodings in relation to the integrity of the Union and the stability of our free institutions. The question has passed from the Church to the State." Federal legislation, based on "the conviction that slavery is a sin," is threatened.

     Reverend Thornwell's conviction, that each constituent Presbyterian church and each State ought to be free to decide the issue of slavery for itself, "is the only position which can save the country from disaster and the Church from schism. He warns that "the continued agitation of slavery must sooner or later shiver this government into atoms."

III Turnbull 159.    (29663)     $350.00

 

282.   Tijuana Bibles: A COLLECTION OF 7 TIJUANA BIBLES, EACH @3" X 4", WITH ORIGINAL PRINTED PICTORIAL WRAPPERS. 1920. Generally 8pp each, in Very Good condition. Printed @1930s-1950s. These feature Baby Face Nelson and Dirty Daisy; Julius, Jr. "The Joyprong Jazzhound; Mischa Auer in "Man Bites Girl"; and others. They are all, of course, engaged in various illustrated forms of indiscreet behavior.

 

     Tijuana Bibles "were produced by a shadowy criminal underground in the 1930s. Very little hard information is available about how the Bibles were created, where they were manufactured, and how they were distributed. One certain fact, confirmed by numerous anecdotes, is that these comic books were for many young men their first peek into the forbidden world of erotic intimacy" [Adelman]. They were crudely printed and illustrated porn tract-comic books. The skimpy stories featured contemporary movie, sports, folk, political and cartoon characters in absurdly hyperbolic sexual relations. Why they're called Tijuana Bibles is a matter of speculation; 'Tijuana' was typically associated with iniquity and as an outlet for behavior considered impermissible elsewhere. Properly considered the ancestor of America's underground comics, Tijuana Bibles declined in popularity in the 1960's as mainstream publications like Playboy would satisfy readers' prurient interests.

Adelman, Tijuana Bibles. Art and Wit in America's Forbidden Funnies. 1930s-1950s. [1997].

   (30017)         $450.00

 

283.   Tillinghast, A.O.: READY PAY MUST BE RESUMED! I AM HARD UP FOR MONEY AND CAN NOT TRUST ANY MORE. THE WHEELS ARE CLOGGED WITH GOOD ACCOUNTS BUT THEY WILL NOT PAY MY DEBTS OR BUY GOODS... [West Valley, N.Y.?: 1887]. Broadside, 8" x 14 1/2", with a portrait of Tillinghast at the head of the title. Printed in a variety of type fonts. Lightly toned, Very Good plus.

 

     "My creditors will not allow me to take Trust for pay any more, and I will stop on the morning of June 20, '87" [the date printed in large, bold type]. Tillinghast discloses his low prices "under Ready Pay Administration," and says he'll accept in exchange "Logs, Skins and Hides...Barley, Peas, Colts, Cows and young stock, Ginseng Root, Dried Fruits, Poultry, Cotton Socks and almost anything but trust."

      Evidently unrecorded.   (29347)   $250.00

 

284.   Toulmin, Harry: A DIGEST OF THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF ALABAMA: CONTAINING THE STATUTES AND RESOLUTIONS IN FORCE AT THE END OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, IN JANUARY, 1823...COMPILED BY APPOINTMENT, AND UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, BY HARRY TOULMIN, ESQ. Cahawba: Published by Ginn & Curtis [J. & J. Harper, Printers, New York], 1823. Modern buckram. xxxiv, [7]-1066 pp. Rubberstamp on title page, tape repair to last leaf [no loss], else Very Good.

 

     This is the first Digest of Alabama laws. It is organized alphabetically by subject, with detailed regulations concerning slavery, Free Negroes, and "Mulattoes." It includes a complete index of all the subjects encompassed. Toulmin had been a Territorial Judge in Alabama and Mississippi; earlier, he had been Kentucky's Secretary of State. "By any standard, his 1823 Digest of the Laws of the State of Alabama is an impressive compilation. Nearly a thousand pages, it encompasses statutes of the Mississippi and Alabama territories as well as the acts of the Alabama state legislature. It is unmatched as a historical document of the Old Southwest and illustrates well how Toulmin shaped the public institutions of the wild frontier" [Encyclopedia of Alabama].

Cohen 5616. Babbitt 8.   (30000)       $1,000.00

 

285.   [Townsend, Samuel]: TO THE DEMOCRACY OF NEW CASTLE CO. AS THERE WILL IN ALL PROBABILITY BE A SET OF BOGUS DELEGATES... Appoquinimink Hundred: Oct. 4, 1856. Broadside, 8 1/4" x 13", printed in two columns, and signed and dated in type at the end by Townsend, William Weldon, Jacob Hill, William M. Johnson, and James Doughten for the Central Committee of Appoquinimink Hundred at the end. Generous margins, a few fox marks at the outer margins. Near Fine.

 

     Townsend, whose papers reside at the University of Delaware, was a prominent Delaware Democrat. He was a staunch Unionist during the War, though he opposed emancipation and would, during Reconstruction, help to found the Delaware White Man's Party.

     In this rare broadside, issued a month before the 1856 elections, Townsend and other members of the Central Committee warn of intraparty strife, led by a "small party of disorganizers" who challenged the duly nominated local ticket; and who have "done nothing towards preparing the party for the terrible struggle that must take place between the Democracy of this county, and the combined factions that are trying to put it down."

OCLC 79153031 [1- Clements], 32084932 [2- U DE, AAS] [as of October 2012].   (29516)         $450.00

 

286.   Tradewell, Jas. D.: ADDRESS ON THE STUDY OF THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTION DELIVERED BEFORE THE POLYTECHNIC AND CALLIOPEAN SOCIETIES OF THE CITADEL ACADEMY, CHARLESTON, S.C. NOVEMBER 19TH, 1856. Charleston: Steam-Power Press of Walker, Evans & Co., 1857. 34, [2 blanks] pp. Disbound, toned, some tide marks, Good+. Inscribed on outer margin of title page, 'Respects of James K. Conway.'

 

     Tradewell became Mayor of Columbia, S.C. soon after he delivered this Address. He was an enthusiastic Southern Nationalist who explicitly disavowed the radical egalitarian ideas of the Declaration of Independence. He discusses here "the question of the rights of the South, under the Federal Constitution, connected with domestic slavery." Having entered innocently into the Constitutional Compact, South Carolina and other Slave States had every justifiable expectation that their power to control their own domestic institutions was unassailable. "How mournful the mistake!" Today the South is threatened by "the temper of popular assemblages, Abolition societies, Free Soil organizations, literary periodicals and productions, works of fiction, the mad ravings of the pulpit, rapine, murder, conflagration and actual civil war." These all "proclaim that the rights of the South are about to fall beneath a falling Constitution."

Not in Turnbull, LCP, or Sabin. OCLC locates six copies under two accession numbers, as of December 2012.

   (29655)         $450.00

 

287.   Trescot, Wm. Henry: THE ANNUAL ADDRESS BEFORE THE CALLIOPEAN AND POLYTECHNIC SOCIETIES OF THE CITADEL ACADEMY, CHARLESTON, S.C. Charleston: Walker & Evans, 1856. 20pp. Disbound without wrappers, else Very Good.

 

     As early as 1850 Trescot had argued publicly for secession and establishment of a separate Southern Confederacy, with imperial ambitions throughout the West Indies, and Central and South America. In this scarce discussion of public education, Trescot outspokenly opposes free universal education. He argues instead that educating a surplus laboring class will merely create restlessness and "wild and ruinous social convulsion." Surplus labor already "reduces the wages of labor to starvation point." Educating such men will excite their "hopes and passions of a nobler life," without reasonable expectation of fulfillment.

     In a Slave Society such as Carolina's, education should be reserved for white citizens. "The white race must preserve its superiority by making its work mental as well as bodily. The State cannot with justice or safety allow the white man to come into competition with the black simply as a laborer."

Not in Turnbull. OCLC 35334323 [5].   (29654)       $450.00

 

288.   Trumbull, Lyman: GREAT SPEECH OF SENATOR TRUMBULL, ON THE ISSUES OF THE DAY. DELIVERED IN CHICAGO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 7TH, 1858. [Springfield : Printed and for Sale at the Daily Journal Office, 1858]. 24pp, caption title [as issued], stitched. Light wear, Very Good.

 

     This is Trumbull's scarce speech-- also printed in Chicago this year-- delivered in the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas campaign, denouncing Douglas and defending the principles of the Republican Party. He assails the Dred Scott decision, and observes that the Court had destroyed Douglas's Popular Sovereignty doctrine when it disapproved of restrictions on slavery in the Territories. Like Lincoln, he asserts a Slave Power conspiracy to nationalize slavery.

     At page 14, this pamphlet also prints an essay entitled, "Douglas' Chicago Speech vs. his Freeport Speech," which chides him for inconsistent remarks on the Dred Scott decision. "Dred Scott Swallowed in Chicago and Thrown Up in Freeport...The Little Dodger Cornered and Caught." It also prints "The Political Record of Stephen A. Douglas," demonstrating his comfort with and affinity for slavery. OCLC locates only five copies, one of which is in Illinois, at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library.

Not in Monaghan, LCP, Sabin, Decker, Eberstadt, Dumond, Work. OCLC 15991105 [5] [as of January 2013].

   (29767)         $650.00

 

289.   United States: TO CAPTAIN GEORGE PILSBERRY COMMANDER OF THE PRIVATE ARMED BRIG CALLED THE UNION. INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PRIVATE ARMED VESSELS OF THE UNITED STATES. [Philadelphia: 1798]. 8pp, caption title [as issued]. Folded sheet, with spines loosened. Browned, occasional light wear. Blanks completed in manuscript. Signed in manuscript, 'Timothy Pickering,' evidently his signature, followed by the printed words, 'Secretary of State.'

 

     This rare document consists of Secretary of State Pickering's printed instructions to privateers, whose mission is "pointed solely and exclusively against French armed vessels, and those vessels, goods and effects of citizens of the United States, or of persons resident therein, which shall have been captured by the French." Captured French vessels are, if "it can be done without injury or great inconvenience, to be sent to some port in the United States, to be tried according to law." Pages 5-8 print the Act of July 9, 1798, pursuant to which Pickering issued the instructions and authorized the actions of the American privateering vessels.

Evans 34695. NAIP w025028 [3- Lpro, MH-H, MWA].

   (22921)         $1,500.00

 

290.   United States Hose Company: CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES HOSE COMPANY. INSTITUTED JULY 4TH, 1826, INCORPORATED MARCH 18TH, 1833. CONSTITUTION REVISED DECEMBER 16TH, 1840. Philadelphia: Printed No. 3 La Grange Street, 1841. 3 1/2" x 5 1/4". 16pp, stitched in contemporary marbled wrappers. Light dusting, Very Good.

 

     The Pennsylvania Act incorporating the Company in 1833 is printed, along with its Constitution, whose Preamble states, "The utility of Hose in affording a constant supply of water in time of  FIRE, has long since been exemplified." OCLC does not record any printed item concerning this Company

Not located in American Imprints, Sabin, or on OCLC.

   (29316)         $350.00

 

291.   Vallette, Elie: THE DEPUTY COMMISSARY'S GUIDE WITHIN THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND, TOGETHER WITH PLAIN AND SUFFICIENT DIRECTIONS FOR TESTATORS TO FORM, AND EXECUTORS TO PERFORM THEIR WILLS AND TESTAMENTS; FOR ADMINISTRATORS TO COMPLEAT THEIR ADMINISTRATIONS, AND FOR EVERY PERSON ANY WAY CONCERNED IN DECEASED PERSON'S ESTATES, TO PROCEED THEREIN WITH SAFETY TO THEMSELVES AND OTHERS. BY...REGISTER OF THE PREROGATIVE OFFICE OF THE SAID PROVINCE. Annapolis: Printed by Catherine Green and Son, 1774. iv, 248, [11], [1 blank] pp, plus engraved title page [toned, minor wear] and Table of Descent opposite page 106 by Sparrow. Original sheep [corners rubbed], rebacked in period style. Text with scattered and generally light foxing, Very Good.

 

     A very early, complete American legal and business guide. This noteworthy book, printed by Ann Green, "has the distinction of being the only Colonial Maryland imprint with a copper engraved title page, which coincidentally was considered the best-known example of Thomas Sparrow's work" [Hudak. Early American Women Printers and Publishers 268]. Green, who inherited the business from her husband in her middle age, "when many women might have indulged in self-pity, summoned all her inner resources and undertook both the support of her children and the accomplishment of a vital public service" [Id. 267]. Wroth says the engraved title page "was Sparrow's best work."

FIRST EDITION. Hudak 9-50 and page 270. Evans 13742. Wroth 338. Cohen 4632.

   (29810)         $2,500.00

 

292.   Virginia: DEBATES AND OTHER PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION OF VIRGINIA, CONVENED AT RICHMOND, ON MONDAY THE 2D DAY OF JUNE, 1788, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DELIBERATING ON THE CONSTITUTION RECOMMENDED BY THE GRAND FEDERAL CONVENTION. TO WHICH IS PREFIXED, THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTION. VOLUME II. [offered with] ... VOLUME III. Petersburg: Printed by William Prentis, 1789. Volume II: 195, [1 blank] pp. Bound in a more-or-less contemporary calf binding, with the initials 'D.H.T." at base of spine, and gilt-lettered black morocco spine labels. Light wear [a couple of tiny holes affecting, at most, several letters]. Very Good.

Volume III: 228pp. Text loosening but complete and clean, except for some spotting of final leaves, two rubberstamps on title page, and a note in red ink in the title page's blank inner margin. Contemporary paper-covered boards [several rubberstamps, boards detached but present, spine perished]. Good+.

 

     This is the rare first printing of the second and third volumes of the Debates. Prentis issued them together in 1789. The first volume issued from Petersburg in 1788. They are a unique record of debates by the foremost revolutionary patriots of Virginia and the new Nation.

     "When the body assembled, David Robertson, of Petersburg, with an assistant, both shorthand reporters, appeared to take down the debates, a thing unprecedented in the history of Virginia assemblies." Swem. Such an illustrious gathering of luminaries has rarely assembled to discuss the fundamental issues of self-government. They included John Marshall, Governor Randolph, George Nicholas, James Madison, Patrick Henry, George Mason, Richard Henry Lee, James Monroe, George Wythe [who "spoke so very low, that his speech could not be fully comprehended"], and a distinguished supporting roster.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 22225. Swem 7589. Cohen 2948.    (29076)         $7,500.00

 

293.   Virginia Resolutions: THE VIRGINIA REPORT OF 1799-1800, TOUCHING THE ALIEN AND SEDITION LAWS; TOGETHER WITH THE VIRGINIA RESOLUTIONS OF DECEMBER 21, 1798, THE DEBATE AND PROCEEDINGS THEREON IN THE HOUSE OF DELEGATES OF VIRGINIA, AND SEVERAL OTHER DOCUMENTS ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE REPORT AND RESOLUTIONS. Richmond: J.W. Randolph, 121 Main Street..., 1850. 264pp. Bound in contemporary marbled cloth and quarter calf [light rubbing and wear], with gilt-lettered red morocco spine label. Very Good.

 

     Publication was doubtless stimulated by the heated struggle over the question of Slavery in the Mexican Cession, which resulted in the Compromise of 1850. Fearing a national despotism which repressed liberties of speech and assembly in the Alien and Sedition Acts, Virginia had issued Resolutions in 1798, drafted primarily by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. They argued that the Union was formed by the compact of sovereign states and that, when the national government exercised powers not explicitly delegated to it, each such state "has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions as of the mode and measure of the redress." They relied upon the Tenth Amendment, reserving to the States or the People powers not specifically delegated to the national government, and the First Amendment, protecting freedom of speech and press.

     This book prints the Report, the debates in the Virginia House of Delegates, its instructions to Congressional representatives, and an Appendix containing the famous letters of James Madison, 'Father of the Constitution,' written during the Nullification Crisis. Former President Madison denounces Nullification as incompatible with constitutional government. "What the fate of the constitution of the United States would be if a small proportion of the states could expunge parts of it particularly valued by a large majority, can have but one answer."

Cohen 6310.   (29701)            $350.00

 

294.   Walter, Thomas U.: REPORT OF THE BUILDING COMMITTEE OF THE GIRARD COLLEGE FOR ORPHANS, TO THE SELECT AND COMMON COUNCILS OF PHILADELPHIA. TOGETHER WITH A REPORT TO THE BUILDING COMMITTEE, BY THOMAS U. WALTER, ARCHITECT. Philadelphia: Printed by T.W. Ustick, 1834. 9, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, lightly dusted and lightly foxed, Good+.

    

     Stephen Girard's will devised a large tract of land to the City of Philadelphia, in trust, for the establishment of a college for poor white male orphans. It prohibited the presence of clergy anywhere on premises. Much litigation would be spawned by these restrictions. Walter, a native Philadelphian, was, according to Wikipedia, the dean of American architecture between the death of Benjamin Latrobe in 1820 and the emergence of H.H. Richardson in the 1870's. He was the fourth Architect of the U.S. Capitol.

     Walter's report is a detailed accounting of expenditures, materials used, and progress of construction. It is the earliest such report recorded on OCLC.

OCLC 33295146 [1- HSP], 78282025 [1- American Philosophical Soc.] [as of August 2012]. AI 24629 [5].   (29242)            $250.00

 

295.   Washington: STATUTES OF THE TERRITORY OF WASHINGTON: BEING THE CODE PASSED BY THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, AT THEIR FIRST SESSION BEGUN AND HELD AT OLYMPIA, FEBRUARY 28TH, 1854. ALSO, CONTAINING THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, THE CONTITUTION [sic] OF THE UNITED STATES, THE ORGANIC ACT OF WASHINGTON TERRITORY, THE DONATION LAWS, &C., &C. Olympia: Geo. B. Goudy, Public Printer, 1855. Attractive contemporary sheep [a hinge just starting], with gilt-lettered morocco spine labels. 488, LXVIII pp. Institutional stamp on front pastedown, light blindstamp on title page, marginal rubberstamps on title page and a couple of other blank margins, margin chip to last leaf without text loss. Else clean text and Near Fine.

 

     The first laws of the Washington Territory.

II Harv. Law Cat. 874. Babbitt 601. Not in Cohen.

    (29994)        $1,000.00

 

296.   [Washington, George]: THE EFFECT OF PRINCIPLE  BEHOLD THE MAN. [Germantown: Germantown Print Works, ca. 1806]. Cotton glazed textile, 11" x 12". Lightly toned, top edge a bit worn. Else Very Good.

 

     The title is inscribed above a full-length portrait of Washington. A portion of the Farewell Address is printed on the left, and a eulogy on the right. The Flag and Screaming Eagle emblem, a square rigger labeled the 'Commercial Union,' and 'The British Lion' are across the bottom. The Design is based on a mezzotint of General Washington. The figure of Washington is a copy of Gilbert Stuart's painting for William Constable. It is recorded separately by Collins, and frequently found as a companion piece to a textile entitled, "The Love of Truth Mark the Boy." AAS says the two were intended to be separated.

Collins, Threads of History 38. AAS 394364.   (28676)        $2,750.00

 

297.   [Washington, George]: LETTERS FROM GENERAL WASHINGTON TO SEVERAL OF HIS FRIENDS, IN JUNE AND JULY, 1776; IN WHICH IS SET FORTH, AN INTERESTING VIEW OF AMERICAN POLITICS, AT THAT ALL-IMPORTANT PERIOD. Philadelphia: Republished at the Federal Press, 1795. [6], 9-44 pp [as issued]. Stitched as issued. Untrimmed, light wear and toning, one faint blindstamp. Good+ or so.

 

     Howes says, "These were 'spurious letters' fabricated by Loyalists to damage the patriot cause." "These noted letters...were printed by Rivington while New York was in the hands of the British. Purported to have come from the pen of Washington, they express opinions and fears utterly alien to his nature and were undoubtedly the work of some British sympathizers. Washington himself suspected John Randolph" [107 Eberstadt 390].

     "These are the same spurious Letters which were industriously circulated in 1778 by James Rivington, and which Washington then declared to be forgeries, and were now republished because of his attitude on Jay's Treaty. The supposed author of the Letters is said to be John Randolph" [Evans].

Howes W137. Evans 28969. Sabin 101741.   (29813)           $600.00

 

298.   [Watch Papers]: LOT OF FIVE EARLY WATCH PAPERS. [Mass., New Jersey, New York: 1840s-1850s]. Lot of five watch papers, each round and measuring 2" in diameter. They have the usual small cuts around the edge to assist with placement inside the watch. A few small pinholes and spots, Very Good.

 

     This lot of five watch papers includes the following:

     D[aniel] Munroe [1775-1859] . Printed on orange paper, the inscription reads: "D. Munroe, Watch & Clock Maker, 150 Court Street, 4 doors East of Revere House, Boston." Engraved on each side of the inscription is an allegorical figure, a woman to the left leaning on an anchor and holding a watch in her opposite hand [usually referred to as "Hope"], and a Roman soldier to the right. Munroe worked in Boston1807-38, in New York 1839-40, and again in Boston 1841-56. This label's date is estimated c.1850-6, as the 1849 Boston directory has him at 149 Washington St., and the 1851 has him moved to the 150 Court St. address.

     Bacon Ware [1794-1853].  Inscribed: "Bacon Ware, Clock, Watch Maker, Salem, Ma." Features engraving of Lady Justice holding the scales in one hand and a watch in her other. Ware opened shop in his native state of New Jersey in 1819 and later partnered with William Paterson on Market St., Salem in 1848.

     Charles Bond [1796-?]. Inscribed: "Charles Bond, Watch Maker, 165 Washington Street, Boston." At the very bottom in smaller type is, "J.V.N. Throop Sc."  At the head of the paper is an engraving of two cherubs sitting on each side of a watch while perched upon a banner. Bond worked as watchmaker in Boston c.1845-65. John Peter Van Ness Throop was an engraver in Washington, D.C., c.1830-50. He was the engraver of the 1841 Great Seal made to replace the original 1782 seal which had become worn. Throop's seal is sometimes called the "illegal seal" due to his change in the design in which he has the eagle hold six arrows instead of the required thirteen.

     Charles Ball [1819-c.1903]. Inscribed: "Charles Ball, Watch Maker, Pokeepsie." Engraving of allegorical female figure leaning against small monument with timepiece placed upon it. Ball was a New York jeweler who traveled back and forth to California in the late '40s to mid-50s, working there for periods of time. By the late 1850s he had left Poughkeepsie for good.

     Phineas Rice  [1777-1859]. Inscribed in red ink: "Phineas Rice, Watch Maker, Charlestown, Mas." Engraving of eagle sitting atop a ribbon which it holds in its mouth. Rice worked as a watchmaker in Massachusetts for many years and is listed as still following his occupation in the 1850 U.S. Federal Census at the age of 73.    (29845)            $875.00

 

299.   Webster, Pelatiah: POLITICAL ESSAYS ON THE NATURE AND OPERATION OF MONEY, PUBLIC FINANCES, AND OTHER SUBJECTS: PUBLISHED DURING THE AMERICAN WAR, AND CONTINUED UP TO THE PRESENT YEAR, 1791. Philadelphia: Joseph Crukshank, 1791. Contemporary calf, lightly rubbed with front hinge just starting. Decorated and gilt-lettered red morocco spine label, raised spine bands. Old bookplate on front pastedown. viii, 504pp. Light scattered foxing, Very Good.

 

     "This is one of the most valuable works dealing with the subject of American finance" [Rosenbach]. "The fiscal difficulties of the Revolution and the economic distress under the Confederation engendered much debate. Far and away the two ablest writers were Pelatiah Webster and S. Gale. Webster began in 1776, and continued for a decade, to expound, in consonance with the most modern principles, the currency evils of the time. These tracts were collected, with some additions, in [this] volume..." [Volume 18, Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Chapter XXIV, Section 4]. "Collected works of an influential political economist of the period who was often consulted by members of Congress on finance and taxation" [Howes].

     The book "presents the reasoning which governed the states in their fluctuating finance from 1776 to the adoption of the Constitution. The author is a very severe critic of the issue of paper money, although he admits that some of the disastrous consequences which he anticipated were not realized. He covers issues of  taxation and paper money," with discussion of "the nature of the political union of the thirteen states, the establishment of the national capital in which the author favors Philadelphia." Webster argues "in favor of the adoption of the constitution," and he gives "a short history of the Bank of North America. The last essay treats of the extent and value of the western unlocated lands. In the appendix are given four scales of appreciation of Continental money by months..." Larned.

FIRST EDITION. Howes W211. I Rosenbach 464. Evans 23972. Larned 2904. Kress 2235.

   (29339)         $5,500.00

 

300.   Webster, Samuel: A SERMON PREACHED BEFORE THE HONORABLE COUNCIL, AND THE HONORABLE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, OF THE STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS-BAY, IN NEW-ENGLAND. AT BOSTON, MAY 28, 1777. BEING THE ANNIVERSARY FOR THE ELECTION OF THE HONORABLE COUNCIL. Boston: Printed by Edes & Gill, 1777. 44 pp, lacking the half title and final blank. Disbound, scattered foxing, some contemporary marginalia. Good+.

 

     This Revolutionary War sermon is an excellent assertion of the Natural Rights doctrine and its application to that conflict. Webster congratulates "this capital, whom the Lord hath delivered out of the hands of the enemy," the British having abandoned Boston two months earlier, thanks to General Washington's brilliant tactics. Today, as has been so during all of recorded history, "we are all suffering together unparallel'd oppressions from the common Enemy." However, "originally all were equally free. Men did not purchase their freedom, nor was it the grant of kings, nor from charter, covenant, or compact, nor in any proper sense from man: But from God. They were born free."

     Government's function is to protect people in their lives, liberties, and property. But "Power, especially over-grown power, whets the ambition and sets all the witts to work to enlarge it," particularly "with standing armies." Hence the need for government by virtuous men, restrained by effective limitations on their power, to "guard against tyranny and oppression." Webster prescribes specific policies to avoid oppressive government: frequent elections, an educated populace, use of standing armies only when necessary, division of powers, and avoidance of monopolies.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 15703. Sabin 102423. Not in Gephart, Stevens Rare Americana, Church Catalog.

   (29077)         $750.00

 

301.   Weir, Robert W.; and J.W. Casilear: THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. FROM ORIGINAL AND ACCURATE PORTRAITS, PAINTED & ENGRAVED FOR THE NEW YORK MIRROR.| DESIGNED BY ROBERT W. WEIR.| ENGRAVED BY J.W. CASILEAR.| ENTERED ACCORDING TO THE ACT OF CONGRESS FOR THE YEAR 1834 BY GEORGE P. MORRIS IN THE CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK. [New York: 1834]. Broadside, 9" x 13", printed on heavy stock. Black and white steel engravings featuring lifelike portraits of George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, John Quincy Adams, and Andrew Jackson. The portraits surround a writing desk with a large mirror behind it, reflecting a statue of Lady Liberty. The small steel engravings are by J.W. Casilear; they are placed upon a background designed by Robert W. Weir which contains fine perpendicular lines and a damasque pattern. Light age toning, minor dusting, a few very small spots of foxing. One small archival verso repair to small closed edge tear. Very Good.

 

     Robert Walter Weir [1803-1889], a New York native, devoted himself to painting at an early age. He joined the staff of the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1834 as a teacher of drawing, and remained on its faculty until 1876. John William Casilear [1811-1893], of New York City, began his career in the 1820s working under engraver Peter Marshall. Although he worked as an engraver through the 1850s, he is most famous for his landscape paintings. His work is displayed at several of the most prestigious museums in the country, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the National Gallery of Art.

Hart, Catalogue of Engraved Portraits of Washington 600 [Grolier Club: 1904]. Baker, The Engraved Portraits of Washington 192 [Philadelphia: 1880]. OCLC 82534475 [1-Brigham Young U.] [as of December 2012]. Catalogue of the Very Important Collection of Rare Americana and Fine Engravings formed by the late Edwin Babcock Holden [1910], #764.

   (29692)         $750.00

 

302.   West Indies: A VERY NEW PAMPHLET INDEED! BEING THE TRUTH: ADDRESSED TO THE PEOPLE AT LARGE. CONTAINING SOME STRICTURES ON THE ENGLISH JACOBINS, AND THE EVIDENCE OF LORD M'CARTNEY AND OTHERS, BEFORE THE HOUSE OF LORDS, RESPECTING THE SLAVE TRADE. London: 1792. 15, [1 blank] pp. Disbound and mildly dusted, else Very Good.

 

     An angry attack on "the Old Jewry Society" and other abolitionists-- "the Wilberforces, the Coopers, the Paines, and the Clarksons." Denouncing their "wild ephemeral theory" the author, identified at the end as 'Truth', accuses them of Jacobin Mobbery and presents evidence that "the Negroes are in general treated with great humanity." Powerful social norms hold in "detestation" anyone who "used unnecessary severity." The effect on commerce of the abolition of the slave trade would be disastrous. "Two of the witnesses for the abolition group were then under charge of perjury." Ragatz.

FIRST EDITION. Ragatz 469. Sabin 99320.   (29281)         $350.00

 

303.   West Wisconsin Railway: THE BONDS OF THIS COMPANY ARE FOR SALE BY WHITE, MORRIS & CO. 29 WALL STREET, NEW YORK. New York: Samuel French, 1871. Original green printed wrappers [wrapper title: 'The First Mortgage Land Grant Sinking Fund Seven Per Cent Gold Bonds, Principal and Interest Payable in Gold, Free of Government Tax. Of the West Wisconsin Railway']. Stitched, 14, [2 blanks] pp. Folding 'Map of Wisconsin Rail Road and Its Connections,' @14" x 16". About Fine.

 

     The Map, by Henry Seibert of New York, prominently shows the West Wisconsin line from St. Paul MN to Tomah WI; tracks other railroads in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa; and depicts Lakes Michigan and Superior, and Green Bay. The Road is described, and the investment recommended. A rare item, OCLC locating only the copy at the University of Missouri.

FIRST EDITION. OCLC 41200220 [1]. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Sabin, Soliday, Graff, Modelski.   (29188)            $450.00

 

304.   [Western Baptist Theological Institute]: REPLY TO "BRIEF HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE WESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE," IN COVINGTON, KY. BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. Covington, KY: [S. Davis, Printer]., 1850. 77, [1 blank], 6pp. Original printed front wrapper [dustsoiled, lightly chipped, lacks rear wrap], stitched. Light foxing to first few leaves, else text quite clean. Early ownership signature of "Rev. S.W. Fisher, Cincinnati," at head of front wrap. Good+.

 

     The 'Brief Sketch,' written by Reverend J. Stevens, was intended "obviously to destroy the Institute in the opinion of the whole Northwest, and to produce, if possible, a diminution of regard for it in the Southwest." The discord reflected an internecine struggle with the Ohio branch of the Church, based in Cincinnati, which resented the Kentucky Trustees for breaking with Ohio. Stevens claimed that Reverend Lynd's acceptance of the presidency of the Kentucky Institute was "one of the most piratical performances of the age," which will cause Ohio to "repudiate him." The final six pages presents the Catalogue of the Institute.

Sabin 69694 [77pp only]. Not in Coleman. OCLC records ten locations, as of September 2012.

   (29250)         $250.00

 

305.   [Western Reserve of Ohio]: TO THE HONOURABLE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR PORTAGE COUNTY: WE, WHOSE NAMES ARE HEREUNTO APPENDED - BEING INHABITANTS OF THE TOWNSHIP OF NELSON, COUNTY OF PORTAGE AND STATE OF OHIO, DO WITH THE MOST PROFOUND RESPECT, HUMBLY REPRESENT: THAT WE DEEM IT ESSENTIAL AND PROPER TO MULTIPLY THE FACILITIES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE IN OUR TOWNSHIP. JUSTICE, WHICH IS THE RESULT OF THE DUE OPERATION OF THE LAW, IS THE SHEET ANCHOR OF EVERY AMERICAN CITIZEN; FOR THAT INESTIMABLE BOON, THE TRANSCENDENT EXCELLENCE OF OUR FREE INSTITUTIONS AND LAWS - OCEANS OF BLOOD HAVE FLOWN FROM THE HEARTS OF OUR PUREST PATRIOTS - AND TREASURES EXHAUSTED TO DEFEND THE RIGHTS OF MAN. BUT WHAT IS LAW, WHICH HAS NOT SUFFICIENT FACILITIES FOR TIMELY OPERATION?... YOUR PETITIONERS WOULD RESPECTFULLY REPRESENT: THAT GARRETTSVILLE IN THE TOWNSHIP OF NELSON, AND COUNTY OF PORTAGE... GIVES INDICATIONS OF BEING A FLOURISHING AND MANUFACTURING AND MERCANTILE VILLAGE... IT SEEMS TO YOUR PETITIONERS, AN  IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION, TO HAVE A JUSTICE OF THE PEACE LOCATED IN THIS PROMINENT POINT BETWEEN WARREN AND CLEAVELAND. FOR IT IS DISTINCTLY IN OUR RECOLLECTION THAT SEVERAL FUGITIVES FROM WARREN IN TRUMBULL CO. HAVE ESCAPED AS FAR AS MONTANA OR FARTHER FOR WANT OF A JUSTICE OF THE PEACE IN GARRETTSVILLE, SUBJECTING THE PURSUERS  TO ADDITIONAL EXPENSE, AND THE RISK OF LOSING THE OFFENDERS OF JUSTICE ENTIRELY. FURTHER, BY HAVING A JUSTICE OF THE PEACE AT THIS POINT, THE APPREHENSION OF HORSE THIEVES, COUNTERFEITERS & C. ESCAPING ON THE ROAD AFORESAID WOULD BE CERTAIN AND EASY... MARCH 8, 1831.|[On verso: PETITION FOR JUSTICE| 1. THE COURT HAVE NO POWER TO AUTHORIZE THE ELECTION OF A JUSTICE OF THE PEACE AT GARRETTSVILLE| 2. THAT TWO MAGISTRATES ARE SUFFICIENT FOR NELSON TOWNSHIP IN THEIR OPINION.| REFUSED.]. [Nelson, Ohio]: 1831. Broadside, 7.5" X 34.5" [three leaves joined end to end with wax]. Manuscript petition written on unlined paper, bold calligraphic heading followed by small, neat handwriting. Signed by sixty-one petitioners from the Township of Nelson. A dampstain runs through the right edge the petition, light scattered foxing. Else Very Good.

 

     This is a petition for the Court to provide the village of Garrettsville, Ohio, with a justice of the peace. Garrettsville was founded in 1804 by Col. John Garrett III and was officially incorporated in 1864. The citizens complain that the township of Nelson had only two justices, neither of which was easily accessible to Garrettsville, leaving Garrettsville "entirely destitute." The petition is followed by the signatures of sixty-one residents. The Court refused the request.

     Among the signers is Elisha Garrett, son of Garrettsville's founder; Lyman W. Trask [1809-1863], a physician and editor of the Western Pearl, a short-lived literary newspaper of the 1830s; Edwin Atwood who built the Garrettsville Grist-mill with Leman Ferry and the first church with John Garrett; and Abraham Dyson, a blacksmith and War of 1812 veteran. Other names include: Willis Hall, Robert H. Scott, Richard A. Denison, Hiram Austin, Warren Waste, John M. Tilden, E.L. Jones, Martin McClintock, Samuel Fuller, Ferriss Couch, Henry Gillmore, Mylowe Eggleston, Joseph Gillmore, John Zubull?, Anson Booth, Joseph A. Chapman, John Noah [by his mark], and many more. [Brown: HISTORY OF PORTAGE COUNTY, OHIO... 1885.]   (29035)  $1,000.00

 

306.   Wettenhall, Edward: GRAECAE GRAMMATICAE INSTITUTIO COMPENDIARIA, IN USUM SCHOLARUM. AUTORE EDV. WETTENHAL, D.D. NUPER EPISCOPO KILMOR, & ARDAG. Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by James Humphreys, Junr., 1776. 12mo. [4], 93, [3 blanks] pp. Disbound. First gathering with blank lower corner chipping. Occasional close trimming to the foremargin but not affecting text. Good+. 

 

     This is the first American edition. A second issued in 1789. The text is entirely in Greek, with Greek letters, and Latin.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. Evans 15218. Hildeburn 3495.

   (29312)         $650.00

 

307.   Wheelock, Eleazar D.D.: A CONTINUATION OF THE NARRATIVE OF THE STATE, &C. OF THE INDIAN CHARITY-SCHOOL, AT LEBANON, IN CONNECTICUT; FROM NOV. 27TH, 1762, TO SEPT. 3D, 1765. Boston: Printed by Richard and Samuel Draper, 1765. 23, [1 blank], page 24, [1 blank] pp. Disbound and lightly toned, Very Good.

 

     "Wheelock, a graduate from Yale in 1733, was pastor of the Second (North) Society in Lebanon, and a popular preacher during the Great Awakening. He began the Charity School (first called More's Charity School, after Col Joshua More, who contributed a house and school-house) in 1754, and by 1765 had some forty-six pupils, all supported by charity.  In 1769 Wheelock was given a charter to establish Dartmouth College, which he did in 1770, and became its first president." [Streeter Sale] Wheelock's plan for the School, formed to instruct Indians and train them "as missionaries and teachers to their respective tribes" [DAB], was inspired by his having taught Samson Occom in the 1740's.

    This is the second in the series of Wheelock's reports on the Indian charity-school, "the acorn from which grew Dartmouth College." Howes W332. The last leaf, an Appendix on Reverend Chamberlain's efforts "to procure another missionary," is frequently absent, but present here. It is dated October 11, 1765; the rest of the pamphlet was printed, and much of it distributed, before the final leaf was submitted to the printer.

FIRST EDITION Evans 10207. Howes W333. Streeter Sale 4062. Field 1639. Sabin 103206.

   (29109)         $1,250.00

 

308.   Whig Party: PROCEEDINGS OF THE DEMOCRATIC WHIG NATIONAL CONVENTION, WHICH ASSEMBLED AT HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA, ON THE FOURTH OF DECEMBER, 1839, FOR THE PURPOSE OF NOMINATING CANDIDATES FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. Harrisburg: R.S. Elliott, 1839. Stitched, 42, [2 blank] pp. Light wear, else Very Good.

 

     This pamphlet records the first national convention for the first successful Whig presidential campaign. The delegates attack President Martin Van Buren, Democratic successor to Andrew Jackson, for having "devoted his whole life to an exaggerated egotism, in ministering to which he has been unscrupulous as to means." The Proceedings are printed chronologically, including the balloting for President, in which William Henry Harrison emerged as the winner, trailed by Henry Clay and Winfield Scott; and for Vice President, with John Tyler chosen unanimously.

     A letter from Henry Clay is printed, coyly suggesting that he would respond to a draft but assuring support to whomever the Convention chose as its nominee. The speech of Judge Burnet of Ohio appears at pages 34-42, "giving a brief history of the life of Gen. William Henry Harrison."

FIRST EDITION. AI 59201 [5]. Miles 76.   (28856)            $375.00

 

309.   [Williams, Henry]: REMARKS ON BANKS AND BANKING; AND THE SKELETON OF A PROJECT FOR A NATIONAL BANK. BY A CITIZEN OF BOSTON. Boston: Torrey & Blair, Printers, 1840. 62, [2 blank] pp. Disbound with light dusting, else Very Good.

 

     Williams is a strong proponent of a new national bank and a harsh critic of existing local banks, which have failed to provide a sound and uniform currency.  He rejects a metallic currency as simply "not practicable," and analyzes at length the weaknesses of local state-chartered banks: repeated charter violations, suspensions, failures; state banks' heterogeneous note issues, which are not uniform in value or appearance. The explains his plan for a national bank, chartered for forty years, with checks and balances designed to avoid abuses and cronyism. Its initial capital of $50 million [$10 million of which would be subscribed by the government] would be enhanced by $10 million of stock sales annually,  with preference given to shareholders of the existing state-charted banks. 

     The author makes reference (p. 49) to recent Whig victories, suggesting that this pamphlet was written late in 1840.  Williams must have been gratified when Henry Clay and the Whigs voted for a national bank, but crushed when President Tyler vetoed the measure.

AI 40-7056 [6]. Sabin 104231.

   (29920)         $275.00

 

310.   Williams, J.L.: LETTER OF J.L. WILLIAMS, ON THE LOCATION BETWEEN OMAHA CITY AND PLATTE VALLEY. [New York: 1865]. 5, [3 blanks] pp. Caption title [as issued], stitched. Lightly dusted, a few marks in blank margins, else Very Good.

 

     This printed Letter, dated January 2 1865, is addressed to the Vice President of the Union Pacific Railroad, Thomas C. Durant. Williams explains that the Railroad's eastward traffic will consist mainly of "the products of the mines, most of which will be of little weight, in proportion to value." Union Pacific traffic westward, to sustain the growing "extensive mining region," will consist of "provisions and breadstuffs...from the Missouri Valley." The Letter is a careful analysis of location alternatives for the Road between these terminal points, based on varying costs.

Bureau of Railway Economics 295. OCLC 5016301 [7] [as of November 2012]. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Soliday, Graff.   (29540)           $250.00

 

311.   Wollstonecraft, Mary: A VINDICATION OF THE RIGHTS OF WOMAN, WITH STRICTURES ON POLITICAL AND MORAL SUBJECTS. Boston: Peter Edes for Thomas and Andrews, 1792. xvi, [1], 18-340 pp, with the half title. Later cloth [lightly worn]. Scattered foxing, ink note on blank portion of title page, Good+. 

 

     Wollstonecraft dedicated her book to Talleyrand, explaining "that her main argument was 'built on the simple principle that, if woman be not prepared by education to become the companion of man, she will stop the progress of knowledge, for truth must be common to all.' ...Its chief object was to show that women were not the playthings of men but ought to be their equal partners, which they could be only if they were educated in the same way." Printing and the Mind of Man. She argued that the rights of man and of woman were identical.

     First printed in London in 1792, it was printed in America in the same year, in both Philadelphia and Boston. 

PMM 242 [London 1792 edition]. Evans 25054.    (28900)  $3,500.00

 

312.   Wood, William: NEW-ENGLAND'S PROSPECT. BEING A TRUE, LIVELY, AND EXPERIMENTAL DESCRIPTION OF THAT PART OF AMERICA, COMMONLY CALLED NEW-ENGLAND: DISCOVERING THE STATE OF THAT COUNTRY, BOTH AS IT STANDS TO OUR NEW-COME ENGLISH PLANTERS; AND TO THE OLD NATIVE INHABITANTS. AND LAYING DOWN THAT WHICH MAY BOTH ENRICH THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE MIND-TRAVELLING READER, OR BENEFIT THE FUTURE VOYAGER. THE THIRD EDITION. [Boston]: London, printed 1639: Boston, New-England, re-printed by Thomas and John Fleet, in Cornhill; and Green and Russell..., 1764. [2], xviii, 128 pp. Lightly toned, Very Good plus. With neat, occasional, contemporary margin comments. Bound in attractive modern brown half-morocco, marbled boards, raised spine bands, and gilt decorations. Title stamped on spine in gilt. With the bookplate of Frank C. Deering, the noted collector.

 

     The first American edition and the only 18th century American printing. "This, the first detailed account of Massachusetts, gives a topographical account of the Massachusetts colony as far as it then extended, and also a full description of its fauna and flora. The second part treats 'Of the Indians, their persons, cloathings, diet, natures, customs...' An Indian vocabulary of five pages is placed at the end, and takes precedence of the linguistic labors of Roger Williams, John Eliot, and others." Church. In the second part Wood makes detailed observations about the several Indian tribes in the vicinity: 'Mohawks', 'Connectecuts,' 'Pequants and Narragansetts.'

     Wood probably came over with the Higgins fleet in 1629. He settled in Lynn, which he calls Saugus and describes in detail. He went home to England in 1633.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. Church 427, Sabin 105074 [1634 edition]. Siebert Sale 96 [1635 edition]. Evans 9884. Not in Eberstadt, Field, Howes.

   (29089)         $1,500.00

 

313.   Woodbridge, William: AN ADDRESS BEFORE THE DETROIT YOUNG MEN'S SOCIETY, DELIVERED BY REQUEST, APRIL, 1848. Detroit: Garrett & Geiger, 1849. Original printed blue wrappers, stitched. 23, [1 blank] pp. Scattered foxing, else Very Good.

 

     "Woodbridge, one time law partner of Lewis Cass, was the first territorial delegate of Michigan to the U.S. Congress." Decker. Greenly describes him as "a self-seeking politician" who delighted in the destruction of his political opponents. Greenly, Bibliography of Michigan pp114-115. This Address examines the "customs and institutions of the early colonists of New England," who were, he says, by their "peculiar genius" and temperament, well suited to found "an independent commonwealth."

FIRST EDITION. AII 830 [5]. 48 Decker 91.

   (29286)         $250.00

 

314.   [Woolworth, James W.]: THIS PAMPHLET IS TRUE!! IT IS A HISTORY OF THE MANNER IN WHICH NEBRASKA BECAME A STATE, ELECTED ITS STATE OFFICERS AND ITS FIRST U.S. SENATORS, AND ENTERED THE AMERICAN UNION. IT IS AUTHENTICATED BY TWENTY-ONE MEMBERS OF THE FIRST STATE LEGISLATURE, WHO SIGNED IT AT THE SESSION OF 1866, JULY. IT WAS NOT WRITTEN BY C.H. GERE. AND IT IS ENTIRELY DISSIMILAR FROM HIS NARRATIVE OF THE EVENTS HEREIN RECORDED. THE NEBRASKA HISTORICAL SOCIETY IS REQUESTED TO PLACE THIS AMONG ITS CONSERVED TRUTHS. Omaha: [Omaha Herald], 1866 [i.e., probably 1880]. 15, [1 blank] pp. Original printed pale blue title wrappers. Bound into modern cloth, with a library number stamped in gilt on lower portion of front cover. Near Fine. Signed in type by J. G. Megoath and twenty other members of the Legislature of Nebraska.

 

     This is the author's version of the history of Nebraska's organization as a State-- against the background of Civil War and early Reconstruction. Watkins's Illustrated History of  Nebraska identifies Woolworth as the probable author. This pamphlet, supporting President Johnson and his Reconstruction policies, tells a story substantially different from that of C.H. Gere, as noted in the Title. Woolworth describes the debate over procedures for adopting a State Constitution; the voting on its adoption; voting irregularities, particularly in Cass County; the unfair denial of victories to several Democrats; the role of the board of county canvassers-- "The Little Jokers"-- in perpetrating the fraudulent election of Republicans. "The men who did these things, were not content with them, but pursued their game to the end and certified into the Legislature men who were never elected; in violation of the rights not of one precinct only, but of the Territory, and thereby elected two radical senators, whereas conservative men were entitled to that distinction."

     Nebraska Imprints Inventory states: "The evidence indicates that though the text of this pamphlet was undoubtedly written in Omaha in 1866, the edition here described was not printed until 1880 or later. The narrative by C. H. Gere, to which exception is taken in the title, apparently is his address entitled 'Admission of Nebraska into the Union,' given before the Nebraska State Historical Society in January, 1880. The Illustrated History of Nebraska, edited by Albert Watkins (Lincoln, 1905), in describing the election controversy of 1866, refers to 'the address to the public, written at the time by James M. Woolworth, and signed by twenty-one members of the legislature,' and reprints its text in full, but does not amplify the attribution to Woolworth" [citations omitted].

AII Nebraska 470. Sabin 90739. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Soliday. 

   (29481)         $450.00

 

315.   [World War I]: SOUVENIR OF EGYPT DECORATIVE SILK BROADSIDE. [c. 1917]. Silk broadside, 15.5" x 18", bright colors, silk tassels tied along all four edges. Small glue remnant in blank upper right corner [probably from an earlier price tag]. Quite clean, extremely attractive, Near Fine. 

 

     This silk broadside features seven flags around the outer edges, six of them with oval portraits of rulers alongside. The two flags at the top are a bit larger: Egypt with Hussein Kamel, and the United Kingdom with King George V. Four of the smaller flags are of  Italy with King Victor Emmanuel III, Belgium with King Albert I, Russia with Emperor Nicholas II; and France with President Raymond Poincare. A seventh, unknown flag has a United Kingdom flag in its upper left corner with the remaining area of the flag in light blue with five stars of varying sizes. Beneath this seventh flag is a banner which reads: "Heaven's light our guide/ Rule Britannia/ Evil be to him who evil thinks/ God Save the King." At the very head of the broadside is a phrase in what appears to be Arabic, and "God save the King." In the bottom right corner in large cursive letters is: "Souvenir of Egypt." At the center are three pyramids, their images reflected in a body of water; and across the water are a man on a camel, a man standing under a tall tree, and a figure in the water with what appears to be a large basket.

     This broadside was made between 1914-1917.

   (29788)         $500.00

 

316.   Worth, Jonathan: MESSAGE OF JONATHAN WORTH, GOVERNOR OF NORTH CAROLINA, TO THE CALLED SESSION OF THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE. 1866. Raleigh: Wm. E. Pell, Printer to the State, 1866. Original printed salmon-colored title wrappers, decoratively bordered. 36pp. Minor wrapper wear, faint blindstamp, Very Good or better.

 

     Worth was at heart a national rather than a sectional man. A Whig, he had denounced nullification in 1831, and was shunned for it. He was part of a minority opposing disunion in 1860-1861, and denounced the North Carolina secession convention of 1861, although as a reluctant Confederate he served as State Treasurer. Elected as Carolina's first post-War Governor, he faced a hostile legislature and supported a speedy Reconstruction.

     This is a significant Message, delivered on January 18, 1866, marking the State's return to civil government and the end of its Provisional Government. Worth is charged with making the transition to a reconstructed member of the Union. Many revisions of law were required, to sunset the remnants of North Carolina's experiment with disunion. Recalcitrant officers of the Provisional Government were, as Worth explains here, reluctant to leave their sinecures. Worth is emphatic that, although they may hold over until election of successors, their powers "ceased with the Provisional Government." The parlous condition of State finances, the absence of specie, the huge war debt are all delineated. "The fortunes of our capitalists have been swept away."

     Worth speaks at length on the Freedmen's Bureau and "the sudden emancipation of the black race." He warns his fellow citizens that slavery is dead, and that "the liberated African" should not be treated with "oppression or injustice." Though Worth does not seek "social equality" or the suffrage for Blacks, he says that "there is no disposition to deny to them any of the essential rights of civil or religious freedom in this State." Clearly much trouble lay ahead. A Report of the Superintendent of Common Schools accompanies Worth's Message.

OCLC 15193631[2- State Lib. N.C., U VA] [as of October 2012].

   (29527)         $875.00

 

317.   Wright, John S.: REPLY TO HON. CHARLES G. LORING, UPON "RECONSTRUCTION." Boston and Chicago [Cambridge]: A. Williams and Company, and J.R. Walsh [Houghton and Company], 1867. 31, [1 blank], xxiv, 189, [3] pp. Original printed wrappers with wrapper title; title page follows page 31 and is at page [iii] [as issued]. Wraps lightly worn, occasional mild text spotting, else Very Good. INSCRIBED ON FRONT WRAPPER, "Hon. R.H. Dana with compliments of J. Wright."

 

     Wright was an indefatigable Chicago editor, promoter, entrepreneur, booster of that City and his State, and a War Democrat. DAB, whose sketch of Wright's life is otherwise respectful, says the author's works published during this period "gave evidence of the weakening of his mind. His reason finally gave way, and he was committed to an asylum in Philadelphia." This pamphlet lends some support to DAB's diagnosis. Wright calls himself "an enthusiast," indeed a "monomane upon this question of State Sovereignty." His "perfect solution" to the problems of the day is outlined in a detailed text on the origins of the State--  with erudite references to Aristotle, Puffendorf, Vattel, and others-- and the sovereignty of the individual States.

Sabin 105613.    (29028)         $275.00

 

318.   Wyoming: THE COMPILED LAWS OF WYOMING, INCLUDING ALL THE LAWS IN FORCE IN SAID TERRITORY, TOGETHER WITH SUCH LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES AS ARE APPLICABLE TO SAID TERRITORY; ALSO THE TREATIES MADE WITH THE SIOUX AND SHOSHONE TRIBES OF INDIANS IN THE YEAR 1868; WITH A SYNOPSIS OF THE PRE-EMPTION, HOMESTEAD AND MINING LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES... J.R. WHITEHEAD, SUPERINTENDENT OF COMPILATION. Cheyenne, Wyoming: H. Glafcke. Leader Steam Book and Job Print., 1876. Bound in modern buckram, with title stamped on spine. CLXIX, [4], 702 pp. One light rubberstamp, else a clean and Fine text.

 

     Organized alphabetically by subject, the Compiled Laws are preceded by the Treaty of Cession of the Louisiana Territory and the Organic Act of Dakota [Wyoming was a part of the Louisiana Purchase, and was originally included in the Dakota Territory]; the Organic Act of wyoming, the Union Pacific Land Grant; the Sioux and Shoshone Treaties; the Public Lands Circular, on homesteading; the Military Bounty Lands statute; Mining Laws: Coal Lands; and other statutes havion particular reference to the Wyoming Territory.

     The Compiled Laws end with an unusually detailed Index.             

AII [WY] 29. II Harv. Law Cat. 970.   (29909)        $600.00

 

319.   Yale College: ANNUAL CIRCULAR OF THE MEDICAL INSTITUTION OF YALE COLLEGE, FOR THE LECTURE TERM OF 1841--2. New Haven: Stanley & Chapin, Printers, 1841. Original printed wrappers, with a woodcut view of the medical school building [repeated on the title page]. Stitched. 7, [1 blank] pp. 'Duplicate' rubberstamp on blank portion of front wrapper, plain rear wrapper addressed to Dr. Simeon Shurtleff of Simsbury. Light spotting and wear, Good+.

 

     The faculty included Benjamin Silliman as professor of chemistry. The course of study, including dissections, is explained, with fees, degrees awarded, the library, donors, and access to the Connecticut hospital "to witness the surgical operations."

     Dr. Shurtleff, the addressee of this scarce Circular, was evidently an avid collector. In the 1860s Wesleyan University purchased his Shurtleff Cabinet, consisting of thousands of species and specimens of birds, shells, and coins.    

AI 41-5657 [2- Huntington, Harvard]. Sabin 105910 [1839-1840 Circular]. OCLC 81183679 [1- Huntington] [as of November 2012].

   (29554)         $250.00

 

320.   Yale College: ANNUAL CIRCULAR OF THE MEDICAL INSTITUTION OF YALE COLLEGE, FOR THE LECTURE TERM OF 1839--40. New Haven: Woodward & Carrington, Printers, 1839. 8pp, stitched. Title page with a woodcut view of the medical school building. Wrappers absent, lightly spotted, Good+.

 

     The faculty included Benjamin Silliman as professor of chemistry. The course of study, including dissections, is explained, with fees, degrees awarded, the "organization of the institution," "means of instruction," donors. Among the advantages of New Haven for a medical school is "the general moral character of its population, and the freedom of the city from theaters, circuses, and other public places of amusement," thus avoiding "habits of vice." Graduates of the class of 1838 are listed, along with "Licentiates."

Sabin 105910. OCLC 82160432 [1- AAS] [as of November 2012]. Not in American Imprints.

   (29555)         $250.00

 

321.   Yeadon, Richard: AN ADDRESS, DELIVERED BEFORE THE EUPHEMIAN & PHILOMATHEAN LITERARY SOCIETIES OF ERSKINE COLLEGE, AT THE ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12TH, 1857, BY...OF CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA. Due-West, S.C.: Printed at the Office of "The Due-West Telescope.", 1857. 51pp. Disbound and spotted, Good.

 

     Yeadon's scarce Address insists that Slavery is the foundation "on which rest the pillars of the great social fabric of the South." Upon Slavery depends "the peace and prosperity, nay, the very existence of the Southern States, as co-equal members of the American Union." The Constitution is structured so that "the institution of domestic slavery, within the several States, has been regarded and held sacred, as a reserved right, exclusively within State jurisdiction and beyond the constitutional power of Congress or of the General Government, except for guarantee, protection and defence." Yeadon then justifies his assertions by analyzing the relevant constitutional provisions and their history.    

III Turnbull 246. Not in LCP or Cohen. OCLC 29820988 [2- Duke, U. So. Car.] [as of December 2012].

    (29684)        $350.00