David M. Lesser, Fine Antiquarian Books LLC

 CATALOG 155: RARE AMERICANA [May, 2017]

Want to place an order?  Call (203) 389-8111, fax (203) 389-9113, or email.

 

On the Pennsylvania Treason Trials

 

1.   [Adams, John]: REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED ON THE FOURTH INSTANT, TO PREPARE AN ADDRESS TO BOTH HOUSES OF CONGRESS. 6TH DECEMBER, 1799. COMMITTED TO A COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE HOUSE, ON MONDAY NEXT. [Philadelphia]: Printed by W. Ross. 1799. 7, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, some loosening and wear to blank inner margin, Good+.

 

     The Committee's Address to the President occurred after the insurrection in Pennsylvania, stimulated by resistance to the first direct tax imposed in the United States. The culprits' trial was the first to define treason as a violation of the Sedition Act. The Committee observes, "That any portion of the people of America should permit themselves, amidst such numerous blessings, to be seduced by the arts and misrepresentations of designing men, into an open resistance of a law of the United States, cannot be heard without deep and serious regret." The Committee congratulates President Adams on his "inflexible perseverance" in pursuing peace with France.

Evans 36565.                                                                                                              $500.00

 

Rare Pamphlets from the A.M.E. Church

 

2.   African Methodist Episcopal Church: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ELEVENTH SESSION OF THE ILLINOIS CONFERENCE OF THE AFRICAN M. E. CHURCH, HELD AT GALESBURG, ILLINOIS, AUGUST 29, 30, 31, SEPTEMBER 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5, 1882. [Chicago?]: Printed by David C. Cook, Publisher of Sunday School Supplies, etc. [1882]. 50, [1], [1 blank] pp. Original staples and printed wrappers. Some wrapper chipping in blank portions. Else Very Good.

 

     A scarce annual report of this African-American religious denomination. The participants and their doings are recorded. The Right Reverend T.M.D. Ward, D.D. was Presiding Bishop. Appointments, Statistical Tables, Financial Data, Missionary Reports and other matters receive the Conference's attention.

Not located on OCLC, as of April 2017. Not in LCP.                                               $450.00

 

3.   African Methodist Episcopal Church: REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE CONNECTIONAL PREACHERS' AID AND MUTUAL RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF THE A.M.E. CHURCH. JUNE 1ST, 1900 TO MARCH 1ST, 1904. TO THE 22ND SESSION OF THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE A.M.E. CHURCH IN SESSION AT CHICAGO, ILL., MAY 2, 1904. Baltimore: Printed by the Afro-American Co. [1904]. Original staples and printed wrappers [narrow chip at front wrapper's fore-edge]. 32pp plus portrait frontis of Bishop Evans Tyree, President; folding table after page 8 ["Mortuary Statement”]; portrait after page 16 of Reverend John Jenifer, Secretary and Treasurer. Very Good.

 

     A preacher's aid society, intended to protect a deceased member's family from want and "distressing humiliations." Financial material is presented in detail. Efforts to overcome early difficulties, particularly those associated with "agents of every conceivable scheme of insurance," are described, and concerns alleviated.

Not located on OCLC as of April 2017. Not in Blockson or LCP. A 1900 publication of this Association is listed at OCLC 76955023 [1- Emory University].                             $450.00

 

A Voluminous Report on the African Slave Trade,

With the Iconic Folding Plate of a Slave Ship

 

4.   [African Slave Trade]: REPORT FROM THE SELECT COMMITTEE OF THE HOUSE OF LORDS, APPOINTED TO CONSIDER THE BEST MEANS WHICH GREAT BRITAIN CAN ADOPT FOR THE FINAL EXTINCTION OF THE AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE; AND TO REPORT THEREON TO THE HOUSE: TOGETHER WITH THE MINUTES OF EVIDENCE, AND AN APPENDIX AND INDEX THERETO. SESSION 1849. [London]: Ordered to be Printed 23rd July 1849. [4], 434, 228 pp, plus the iconic folding plate of a slave ship after page 240; folding map, entitled 'African Station | Outline from Admiralty Chart' after Appendix page 74; enormous 'Chart to Shew the Current State of the Slave Trade on the West Coast of Africa.' The number "(32.)" printed at bottom of title page. Bound in later cloth. A couple of minor rubberstamps [with withdrawal], else Near Fine.

 

     The rare first report of this Select Committee, followed in 1850 by a second, more common report. Witnesses appeared before the Committee from April through early July, 1849. Their testimony, printed at pages 3-432, describes the various attempts to suppress the African Slave Trade, Treaties and other efforts for foreign governments "to punish slave-trading"; the types of vessels used in the Slave Trade, and their outfitting; Brazil as a major offender; culture and other characteristics of the African nations from which the slaves are taken, with eyewitness accounts from missionaries; the horrors and high mortality rates of the middle passage-- disease, whippings, lack of food and water. "Every slave, whatever his size might be, was found to have only five feet and six inches in length and sixteen inches in breadth to lie in. The floor was covered with bodies stowed or packed according to this allowance... The men were chained two and two together by their hands and feet, and were chained, also, by means of bolts, which were fastened to the deck." The graphic plate of the Slave Ship demonstrates these horrific conditions.

       The Appendix lists hundreds of vessels stopped by British Cruisers for carrying on the slave trade, with their dates of capture, tonnage, number of slaves, and judgments; more testimony; constitutions of Liberia and the American Colonization Society; official documents; and a variety of other useful material.

LCP 4276. OCLC lists only a few locations of this rare item.                                   $3,500.00

 

“The Unhappy Status of the Jews of Eastern Europe”

 

5.   American Jewish Congress: MEMORIALS SUBMITTED TO PRESIDENT WILSON CONCERNING THE STATUS OF THE JEWS OF EASTERN EUROPE, AND IN PALESTINE. BY REPRESENTATIVES OF THE AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS ON MARCH 2, 1919. [New York?]: 1919. [2], 40 pp. Stapled as issued, and printed on rectos only. Bit of blank edge chipping [generously margined], Good+.

 

     On the "unhappy status of the Jews of Eastern Europe," and the hope that the ongoing Peace Conference will guarantee them "full civil, religious, political, and national rights."

                                                                                                                                    $175.00

 

The American Buffalo “Has Created Havoc on St. James Street”

 

6.   [American Revolution]: AMUSEMENT FOR JOHN BULL & HIS COUSIN PADDY, OR, THE GAMBOLS OF THE AMERICAN BUFFALO, IN ST. JAMES'S STREET. [London]: L. Fielding. Pater-noster Row, May 1, 1783. 4-3/8" x 6-5/16", mounted on paper matting. Light wear to matting edges, else Fine.

 

     "A large buffalo, representing America, has created havoc on St. James Street. A woman peddler has fallen over and dropped fish and bread on the street, and English ministers rush to grab the goods. . . . George III watches the entire scene and smiles" [Cresswell]. One of the newly elected Ministers says, "This American Buffalo, has occasioned glorious sport. Keep off Bigwig." Another says, "I'll share what I get among the Loyalists, if I don't change my mind."

     "Print shows several ministers helping themselves to fishes and loaves that have spilled from a fishwife's basket which was upset by a rampaging 'American Buffalo'; among those depicted are the Duke of Portland, Lord Cavendish, Lord North, Charles Fox, Lord Thurlow, Admiral Keppel, Lord Shelburne, and Thomas Pitt. George III watches the shameless opportunism from a window in the background" [Library of Congress].

Cresswell 857. Stephens. British Museum Catalogue of Political and Personal Satires 6223. OCLC 957274794 [1- Morgan Lib.], 61196044 [1- Lib. Cong.], 57744648 [2- MA Hist., Boston Athenaeum], 58871490 [2- Yale, Clements] as of April 2017.                   $600.00

 

Scarce Variant Printing

 

7.   Ames, Nathaniel: AN ASTRONOMICAL DIARY, OR, ALMANACK FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD CHRIST 1769. Boston: Printed and Sold by William McAlpine in Marlborough-Street, [1768]. 12mo. 12 leaves (complete), Some spotting and marginalia, stitched, Good+.

 

     A scarce printing of an oft-printed 1769 almanac. It is one of two states of this McAlpine imprint; the other has a comma in the imprint after 'McAlpine.' It includes a discourse on the manufacture of silk and the five eclipses that will occur during the year; lists roads and distances to and from various New England cities; and tells 'An Indian Story' involving a dispute between the French and the Natchez Indians.

Evans 10815 Drake 3171. NAIP w019326 [5].                                                          $250.00

 

8.   Anthony, Elliott: A TREATISE ON THE LAW OF CONSOLIDATION OF RAILROAD COMPANIES; BEING AN ARGUMENT IN THE CASE OF JULIUS WADSWORTH, OF NEW YORK, ET AL. VERSUS CHICAGO & NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY, WILLIAM B. OGDEN, ET AL. IN THE UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS, HON. DAVID DAVIS, OF THE U.S. SUPREME COURT, PRESIDING. Chicago: Beach & Barnard, Printers, 14 South Clark Street, 1865. xvi, 288 pp. Bound in modern cloth, with spine title stamped in gilt. A clean and bright text. Near Fine.

 

     Anthony, who as a student read law with Timothy Dwight, moved to Illinois in 1852. He quickly rose in the Illinois Bar, was elected City Attorney and Corporation Counsel, and was counsel to the Galena and Chicago United Railroad. When that Road amalgamated with the Chicago and Northwestern, the nonconsenting stockholders and bondholders hired him to nullify the consolidation. He argues here that a law authorizing consolidation of the capital stock of "two distinct corporations" is void unless all shareholders agree. Otherwise, it "would impair the obligations of the contract which a share holder enters into with the corporation when he becomes a member of it, contrary to the 10th section of the Constitution of the United States" and its parallel Illinois provision.

     David Davis managed Abraham Lincoln's campaign for the Republican nomination in 1860; Lincoln appointed him to the Supreme Court.

Ante-Fire Imprints 872. Not in Harv. Law Cat. or Marke. OCLC records two locations and many Kirtas Technologies reprints as of April 2017.                                                         $500.00

 

“Necessity Which Knows No Law, Dictates, That

White and Colored Children shall be Taught in Separate Schools”

 

9.   Arnold, James M.: SOME REFLECTIONS ON THE SCHOOL LAWS AND EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS OF THE STATE. AN ADDRESS, DELIVERED TO THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI, AT OXFORD, MISS., ON THE 28TH OF JUNE, 1881. BY JUDGE JAMES M. ARNOLD, OF COLUMBUS, MISS. [Columbus, Miss.: Ferris & Youngblood, 1881]. 32pp. Original staples, original printed wrappers with wrapper title, as issued. Very Good.

 

     Arnold acknowledges that Mississippi's financial burdens are increased by its establishment of two separate school systems. "Necessity which knows no law, dictates, that white and colored children shall be taught in separate schools. To ignore these necessities would be fatal to the educational interests of the State." The existence of "different races who cannot be educated together" has been recognized even in Massachusetts, where Chief Justice Shaw in 1849 endorsed Boston's segregated school system.

     Citing court cases long before the Supreme Court's 1896 decision in Plessy vs. Ferguson, Arnold explains, "Any classification for school purposes which preserves substantially, equal advantages to both races, does not impair the constitutional rights of either." The losers in the Mississippi school system, he says, are women: Mississippi has not provided for "the complete education of woman... Cramped education is the badge of distinction conferred upon woman!" 

Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.                                                                   $500.00

 

Early Record of American Baptists

 

10.   Asplund, John: THE ANNUAL REGISTER OF THE BAPTIST DENOMINATION, IN NORTH-AMERICA; TO THE FIRST OF NOVEMBER, 1790. CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE CHURCHES AND THEIR CONSTITUTIONS, MINISTERS, MEMBERS, ASSOCIATIONS, THEIR PLAN AND SENTIMENTS, RULE AND ORDER, PROCEEDINGS AND CORRESPONDENCE. ALSO REMARKS UPON PRACTICAL RELIGION. HUMBLY OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC. [Philadelphia: Thomas Dobson, 1792]. Quarto. iv, [5]-57, [1 blank], 69-70 pp. [as issued]. Untrimmed, first two gatherings uncut. Stitched in original plain drab wrappers [reinforced with clear tape]. Generously margined, but three words trimmed in a footnote at the bottom of page 27. Very Good.

 

     Prefaced from Southampton County, Virginia, July 14, 1791, the first year of Asplund's annual Baptist Register. Originally "it was printed in Richmond, Virginia, in 1791 and contained 60 pages in quarto." Dobson also printed another issue in Philadelphia in 1792, containing 70 pages. See, Evans 26583. "In the present issue, the appendix relating to the Baptist churches of Great Britain (p. 58-66) has been omitted, and p. 57 has been reset."

     The document identifies the minister, number of members, and county of location of each Baptist church in each of the States; and provides data about each Baptist Association.

Evans 26582. Howes A361.                                                                                       $650.00

 

 

Rare Kansas-Colorado Railroad Promotional for Colorado’s San Juan Mining District

 

11.   [Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad]: SAN JUAN GUIDE. VOL. 1. NO. 1. TOPEKA, KANSAS, JUNE, 1876. Topeka, Kansas: June, 1876. Folio, 12" x 17.25". 8pp. Each page printed in three columns. Masthead illustration, surrounded by rectangular border, of a train approaching the Rocky Mountains; men and a horse-drawn covered wagon far behind; vignettes at upper corners of U.S. coins and at lower corners of "picks" and "bricks." "Map, Showing Only Direct Route to San Juan Mines, via Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe R.R," 6" x 15". Handbill laid in, 5 1/2" x 9", printed on yellow paper, advertising the AT&SF line and its amenities. Bit of separation at the spine, several short splits along folds [minor wear], one archivally repaired fold split affecting several letters. Else a Very Good copy of a rare survival.

 

     This is the rare first of only two issues of this promotional; the other was printed in 1877. It describes the San Juan Mining District in southwest Colorado; the different silver and gold mines in San Juan, La Plata and San Miguel; profits to be made; outfitting for the mines, and costs of doing so; the mineral resources including weights per cubic foot and specific gravity of common minerals; eyewitness reports on travel and area amenities; and many more details. Four full pages print "Six Months in San Juan. Its Marvellous Deposits of Gold and Silver! A Description of its Mines, Mining Districts, Beautiful Scenery and Routes of Travel, Etc." 

     The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, chartered in 1859, was organized with the purpose of connecting Atchison and Topeka, Kansas, with Santa Fe. It reached the Kansas/Colorado border in 1873, and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. Gold and silver mines were discovered in the San Juan area between 1869-1871, but the Ute Indian Treaty prohibited entrance into this southwest Colorado mining area. In 1874 the Brunot Treaty opened four million acres in San Juan to explorers and settlers. Government geological surveys of the area, along with advertisements of land promoters and growing access to the region via the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe line, led to exponential growth and development of the area into the early 1880s.

OCLC 173724699 [4- Yale, AAS, U WY, Athenaeum of Phila.] as of March 2017. Not in Graff, Eberstadt, Dary, Decker, Soliday.                                                                       $5,000.00

 

With a Dramatic Title Page Cut

 

12.   Aufrer, Anthony: THE CANNIBALS' PROGRESS; OR THE DREADFUL HORRORS OF FRENCH INVASION, AS DISPLAYED BY THE REPUBLICAN OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS, IN THEIR PERFIDY, RAPACITY, FEROCIOUSNESS AND BRUTALITY, EXERCISED TOWARDS THE INNOCENT INHABITANTS OF GERMANY. TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN. Hartford: Hudson & Goodwin, 1798. 32pp, stitched. Light foxing, uniform toning. Good+. With a title page cut by Wm Wabsworth [i.e., Wadsworth] of French troops killing innocent civilians.

 

     This is one of eleven American printings of an intemperate Francophobic work, all issuing in 1798, the highwater mark of America's quasi-War with France. "Not a trace of decency, not the least regard to religion and its customs, appeared in the conduct of the French soldiery... The most brutal actions and the greatest excesses were committed..."

Evans 33329. Trumbull 485.                                                                                      $600.00

 

 

 

 

Rare Post-War Printing of Augusta’s Ordinances

 

13.   [Augusta, Georgia]: THE GENERAL ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF AUGUSTA, COMPILED AND PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF COUNCIL, JULY 23, 1867, TO WHICH ARE ANNEXED THE RULES AND RESOLUTIONS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF AUGUSTA; THE ORDINANCES FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE AUGUSTA CANAL, THE CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE AUGUSTA WATER WORKS, THE CONSTRUCTION OF STREET RAILWAYS, AND THE SEVERAL ACTS OF THE LEGISLATURE RELATING TO THE CITY OF AUGUSTA AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE AUGUSTA CANAL. Augusta, Ga.: Georgia Printing Company. 1867. 171, [1 blank], viii pp. Stitched, original plain rear wrapper present. Small stamp on blank portion of title page, pencil library notes on its blank verso. Light toning and foxing, minor wear. Good+.

 

     A rare printing of Augusta's 151 Ordinances, with the other documents noted in the title.

Not in De Renne. OCLC 22947542 [1- Augusta U.] as of March 2017.                   $375.00

 

The Baptist Church in Georgia

 

14.   [Baptist Church in Georgia] Lower Canoochee Association: MINUTES OF THE LOWER CANOOCHEE ASSOCIATION, IN SESSION AT LOWER BLACK CREEK CHURCH. BRYAN COUNTY, GA. FROM THE 10TH TO THE 12TH OF OCTOBER, 1857. Savannah: Power Press of John M. Cooper. 1857. 8pp, loose, faint rubberstamp, toned. Good+. 

 

     The 'State of the Churches' lists the name, county , messengers, and statistics of each member church. The Circular Letter and Corresponding Letter are signed in type at the end by the Moderator, John G. Williams, and the Clerk, E. Banks. Also printed are the Articles of Faith ["the only true mode of Baptism is Immersion"], the Rules, and the Association's Constitution.

Not in De Renne.                                                                                                        $250.00

 

15.   [Baptist Church in Georgia] Yellow River Baptist Association: MINUTES OF THE THIRTIETH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE YELLOW RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, CONVENED AT FRIENDSHIP CHURCH. GWINNETT CO., GA., SEPTEMBER 23, 24, 25, & 26, 1854. Covington, Georgia: "Messenger" Print, 1854. 8pp, stitched, crudely trimmed [uneven, wide margins at fore-edge], chip at lower blank corners. Scattered foxing. Good+.

 

     Willis C. Norris was Moderator. His Circular Letter appears at the end. A table entitled 'State of the Churches' lists each participating church, with its county, delegates' names, and statistical data. The Convention's Minutes reflect the stormy political condition of the country. The delegates "disclaim, in the most unequivocal and emphatic manner, all or any participation in, or fellowship for" a Resolution introduced by Northern Baptists opposing the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which would bring slavery into the Mexican Cession and repeal the 1820 Missouri Compromise. The Association denounces "the presumptuous and, in our judgment, blasphemous assumption and desecration of that sacred name and divine prerogative of the Almighty God by the self-styled clergy..."

Not in De Renne.                                                                                                        $350.00

 

16.   [Baptist Church in Georgia] Yellow River Baptist Association: MINUTES OF THE TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE YELLOW RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. CONVENED AT SORREL'S SPRING CHURCH, WALTON CO, GA., SEPTEMBER 24, 25, 26, AND 27, 1853. Covington, Georgia: Messenger Print, 1853. 8pp, folded. Light toning, chip to blank lower corner. Else Very Good.

 

     Willis C. Norris was Moderator. His Circular Letter precedes a table entitled 'State of the Churches,' with each participating church listed, and its county, delegates' names, statistical data. Minutes of the Convention are printed. Page 8 advertises the "Southern Baptist Messenger," edited by William L. Beebe and "devoted to the service of the Old School Baptists.

Not in De Renne.                                                                                                        $275.00

 

17.   [Barry, Joseph]: THE ANNALS OF HARPER'S FERRY WITH SKETCHES OF ITS FOUNDER, AND MANY PROMINENT CHARACTERS CONNECTED WITH ITS HISTORY, ANECDOTES, &C, BY JOSEPHUS, JUNIOR. SECOND EDITION. Martinsburg, W. VA: Office of the "Berkeley Union." 1872. 126pp, two plates, stitched. Original printed and illustrated wrappers [chipped at extremities without affecting text or illustration]. Front wrapper illustrated with a portrait of John Brown [repeated after page 32], rear wrapper with a portrait of John W. Garrett [repeated after page 110]. Text clean. Advertisement for the Mountain View Hotel in Harper's Ferry laid down on the plain inner rear wrapper. Good+.  

 

     This is the second edition, substantially enhanced, "the unexpected success of a prior and much smaller edition" [Hagerstown, 1869] having prompted it. The book treats the early history of the Town, but emphasizes the important period from John Brown's raid through the end of the Civil War. Born in Ireland, Barry spent most of his life in Harper's Ferry and became an authority on its history. He witnessed many of the described events, including the John Brown Raid; he attended Brown's trial.

     The advertisement for Mountain View Hotel measures 4" x 6.25" and contains about 20 lines of text. It reads: O.E. MALTBY| J. JESSE MOORE| MOUNTAIN VIEW HOTEL, HARPER'S FERRY, WEST VIRGINIA. LATELY RENOVATED AND PUT IN THROUGH REPAIR, IS NOW OPEN FOR THE ACCOMMODATION OF TRAVELERS. THE PROPRIETORS HAVE SPARED NO EXPENSE IN RENDERING THE HOUSE COMFORTABLE AND CONVENIENT... THE GREAT NATURAL BEAUTY OF THE SURROUNDING SCENERY, THE SALUBRITY OF THE PLACE AND THE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONS CONNECTED WITH LOCALITY, SHOULD NOT BE OVERLOOKED BY TOURISTS... T.H. PERCEVAL, SUPT., MALTBY & MOORE, PROPRIETORS.| YOUNG, PRINT." It was probably printed around 1872: an 1872 article in the West Virginia newspaper "Spirit of Jefferson" states that the traveling public "may now rely upon accommodations" in the area. ["Spirit of Jefferson," Charles Town, West Virginia, June 18, 1872, Vol. 25, No. 25, Page 3, Column 1.]

Howes B191. 137 Eberstadt 65.                                                                                 $275.00

 

Plantation Owner Hanged for Murdering His Slave

 

18.   Belisario, A.M.: A REPORT OF THE TRIAL OF ARTHUR HODGE, ESQUIRE, (LATE ONE OF THE MEMBERS OF HIS MAJESTY'S COUNCIL FOR THE VIRGIN-ISLANDS) AT THE ISLAND OF TORTOLA, ON THE 25TH APRIL, 1811, AND ADJOURNED TO THE 29TH OF THE SAME MONTH; FOR THE MURDER OF HIS NEGRO MAN SLAVE NAMED PROSPER. STENOGRAPHICALLY TAKEN BY A.M. BELISARIO, ESQUIRE, ONE OF THE GRAND JURY WHO FOUND THE BILL OF INDICTMENT; AND CERTIFIED TO BE IMPARTIAL AND CORRECT BY HIS HONOR RICHARD HETHERINGTON, ESQ. PRESIDENT OF THE VIRGIN-ISLANDS, AND PRESIDENT OF THE COURT ON THIS TRIAL. Middletown [CT]: Tertius Dunning, 1812. Contemporary paper-covered boards [rebacked in period style]. [2], 186 pp. Untrimmed, occasional toning and mild foxing. Very Good.

 

     A rare printing of a judicial rarity: the trial of a master for murdering his slave. American Imprints, locating only one copy [Fisk University], suggests incorrectly that Middletown Tennessee, was the printing site. Hodge's brutality was too much even for the slave province of Tortola: the jury sentenced him to hang because Hodge, after having flogged Prosper for two days, left him to die a painful death-- without food or medical aid-- over the next week and a half.

     This case was extraordinary for several reasons, not least that "the chief prosecution witness was a free black woman. In the slave states (and some of the free states) it was illegal for a black to testify against a white" [Finkelman 291]. The evidence demonstrated Hodge's notoriously cruel treatment of his slaves. For Hodge's lawyers to assert "that a negro, being property, it was no greater offence in law for his owner to kill him, than it would be to kill his dog" [page 77], was surely a major tactical error. Hodge was hanged; the case apparently contributed to the abolition of slavery in the British West Indies.

FIRST EDITION. Finkelman 290. II Harv. Law Cat. 1103. AI 24790 [1]. OCLC locates 7 as of April 2017 [several accession numbers]. LCP Supp. 1080. Cohen 12700.                      $1,750.00

 

Judah Benjamin’s Diplomatic Correspondence with England

 

19.   Benjamin, Judah P.: CORRESPONDENCE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE, IN RELATION TO THE BRITISH CONSULS RESIDENT IN THE CONFEDERATE STATES. Richmond: 1863. 55pp, stitched, original printed wrappers [several chips], light Rebel Archives rubberstamps on front wrap and three subsequent pages, else Very Good.

 

     Secretary of State Benjamin's diplomatic correspondence concerning the delicate British attempts to maintain positive relations with the Confederacy. Although England withheld recognition of its independence. England wished to protect its subjects residing in the South who were drafted into the army. Also included is Georgia Governor Brown's correspondence advising the British to stop interfering with the Confederate military draft.

FIRST EDITION. P&W 1783. Crandall 839. Not in Singerman.                              $850.00

 

Early Baptist Church in North Carolina

 

20.   Biggs, Elder Joseph: A CONCISE HISTORY OF THE KEHUKEE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, FROM ITS ORIGINAL RISE TO THE PRESENT TIME. WHEREIN ARE SHOWN ITS FIRST CONSTITUTION, INCREASE, NUMBERS, PRINCIPLES, FORM OF GOVERNMENT, DECORUM, REVOLUTIONS THAT ASSOCIATION HAS PASSED THROUGH, REVIVALS, MINISTERS, CHURCHES, CONFESSION OF FAITH, TIMES AND PLACES WHEN AND WHERE ASSOCIATIONS HAVE BEEN HOLDEN, QUERIES AND THEIR ANSWERS; AND ALL OTHER USEFUL ARTICLES RELATIVE TO CHURCH HISTORY. IN TWO PARTS. BY...PASTOR OF THE BAPTIST CHURCH AT SKEWARKEY. [Tarborough, N.C.]: Printed and Published by George Howard, Office of the Tarborough (N.C.) Free Press, 1834. xxv, [1 blank], [27]-300 pp. Modern quarter calf and marbled boards. Accession numeral on blank verso of title page, faint blindstamp, inner margin of title leaf reinforced. A clean and attractive text, light scattered foxing. Else Very Good.

 

     This early Tarborough imprint is a valuable contribution to the history of the settlement of North Carolina and the development of its religious institutions. It "contains the history of the Kehukee Association, from its first organization until 1803, as compiled by Elders Burkitt and Read." It then continues, as the result of Biggs's research, "the History of the Association until the present time [together with a history of the churches now in the Association]."

Thornton 886. Sabin 5335. AI 23417 [5].                                                                  $450.00

 

With “Mat, the Cave Guide,” as Added Attraction

 

21.   Binkerd, A.D.: THE MAMMOTH CAVE AND ITS DENIZENS. Cincinnati: Robert Clarke & Co., Printers, 1869. [1-half title], [1 blank], 95, [1-illustration] pp. Original printed front wrapper [light wear], disbound. Title page printed in three colors, final page features illustration of two Indians. Very Good.

 

     Binkerd describes the natural features of the Cave, its animal inhabitants, climate, and atmosphere. He recommends engaging "Mat, the Cave Guide," who is "about a fair average of the Anglo-African race" and who "has gathered a considerable vocabulary of very clever terms, which he loves to employ when he has in his train any whom he thinks capable of understanding big words." A three-page poem called 'Mammoth Cave' by George D. Prentice, and a table of distances on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad are included.

Coleman 2456. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, Sabin.                                                       $275.00

 

“The Two Races Cannot Occupy the Same States Without Mutual Injury”

 

22.   Blair, Frank P., Jun.: COLONIZATION AND COMMERCE. AN ADDRESS BEFORE THE YOUNG MEN'S MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF CINCINNATI, OHIO, NOVEMBER 29, 1859. BY... OF MISSOURI. [Cincinnati? 1859]. 8pp, caption title [as issued]. Disbound, light margin spotting. Good+.

 

     Blair explains his pet project: combining emancipation with colonization "in the congenial regions of the American tropics, for such of our negroes as are now free, or who hereafter may be enfranchised by States or individuals, and who may choose to go there, and to offer them such inducements, by securing them self-government, free homesteads, and protection against foreign or domestic molestation, as they will not and cannot refuse."

     Blair argues that "the two races cannot occupy the same States without mutual injury." And slavery injures, most of all, other whites "by monopolizing and degrading all the industrial occupations, which elsewhere supply the wants of an independent yeomanry, puts education within their reach, and makes improvement possible."

FIRST EDITION. LCP 1253. Not in Sabin, Thomson, Eberstadt, Work.                 $250.00

 

“Can a White Woman Lawfully Marry a Free Black or Colored Man?”

 

23.   Blanding, A[braham]; D[avid] J. M'Cord: THE CAROLINA LAW JOURNAL. VOL. I. Columbia, S.C.: Times and Gazette Office, 1831. [2], 669, [3] pp, as issued. Text browned, light to moderate foxing. Else Very Good. Contemporary sheep, rebacked.

 

     The Carolina Law Journal, a scarce and short-lived periodical, consists of this single volume. Four issues only were printed: No. I, dated '1830'; No. II., October 1830; No. III., January 1831; and No. IV., April 1831. They are preceded by the general title page. After page 669 the editors state, apparently with some bitterness, "This number completes the first volume of the Law Journal. For reasons which it is unnecessary to state, the work will be discontinued. Those who have not contributed the amount of their subscription will see the propriety of remitting the same immediately, that the business relating to the Law Journal may be brought to a close as early as possible." The succeeding page is the Index; the final page advertises the Times and Gazette Office.

     Blanding and McCord, highly regarded South Carolina attorneys, were also prominent in civic affairs. Their single volume reported on current developments in the law, as well as material of general legal interest. The most fascinating article is entitled "Coloured Marriages" at pages 92-105. Knotty legal issues are discussed: "Can a free white man lawfully marry a free black or colored woman? Can a white woman lawfully marry a free black or colored man?" Are such unions "against public decorum? Such a union is a sure means of propagating among us personal deformity, more or less, as the offspring partakes of similitude to the black ancestor." Other articles concern "The Character of Lord Coke," "Rights and Powers of Juries," trusts and trustees, land rights and adverse possession, evidence and competency of testimony, naturalization, corporate liability, transfers in fraud of creditors, reports and analyses of judicial decisions. Also included is "A Digested Index of the Acts of Assembly from 1813 to 1830 inclusive"

I Harv. Law Cat. 337. AI 6422 [5]. Marvin 129 erroneously records "The South Carolina Law Journal", printed in Columbia in "1821". Sabin 10964 [erroneous publication date of 1821]. Not in Cohen, Turnbull, Marke. OCLC records only facsimiles as of April 2017.       $1,500.00

 

Excellent Copy of an Important Work on Canada

 

24.   Bouchette, Joseph: THE BRITISH DOMINIONS IN NORTH AMERICA; OR A TOPOGRAPHICAL AND STATISTICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PROVINCES OF LOWER AND UPPER CANADA, NEW BRUNSWICK, NOVA SCOTIA, THE ISLANDS OF NEWFOUNDLAND, PRINCE EDWARD, AND CAPE BRETON, INCLUDING CONSIDERATIONS ON LAND-GRANTING AND EMIGRATION; AND A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF LOWER CANADA; TO WHICH ARE ANNEXED, THE STATISTICAL TABLES AND TABLES OF DISTANCES, PUBLISHED, WITH THE AUTHOR'S TOPOGRAPHICAL MAPS OF LOWER CANADA, IN CONSEQUENCE OF A VOTE OF THE PROVINCIAL LEGISLATURE… EMBELLISHED WITH VIGNETTES, VIEWS, LANDSCAPES, PLANS OF TOWNS, HARBOURS, &C. CONTAINING ALSO A COPIOUS APPENDIX. IN TWO VOLUMES. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1831. 4to. Two volumes: Vol. I - frontispiece with tissue guard, xxvi, [2-List of Plates, Corrigenda], 498pp, [4-plates tables], 22 plates of illustrations and maps; Vol. II - frontispiece plate illustration, [iii]-xi, [1-list of plates], 296, [360] pp, frontispiece illustration, 7 plates of illustrations and maps. Half title lacking in volume 2, else complete as issued. Bound in modern quarter calf and marbled boards, raised spine bands and gilt-lettered morocco spine labels. Very Good.

 

     An important work on Canada, with a nice selection of maps and plates, including a double-page lithograph of Montreal. The second section of Vol. II is an unpaginated "Topographical Dictionary of Lower Canada," which Sabin lists separately while noting the two works are often found together. 

     Plates in Volume I include: Portrait of Joseph Bouchette (frontispiece); Monument, Source of the St Croix; Brock's Monument (Vignette); By-Town, Ottawa River; Union Bridges, Ottawa River; Section and Plan of Union Bridges, Ottawa River; Harbour of York; Town of Goderich; Town of Guelph; Section of Niagara River; Monument to Wolfe and Montcalm (Vignette); City of Montreal (View); City of Montreal (Plan); City of Quebec (View); City of Quebec (Plan); Falls of Montmorenci (Winter Scene); Forges of St. Maurice; St. Hyacinthe Village, S. St. Hyacinthe; Isle aux Noix and Fort, S. De Lery; Fort and Basin of Chambly, Chambly West; Kilburn's Mills, Province Line, Stanstead; Harrower's Mills, Ph. St. Jean, Port Joli; Long's Farm, Temiscouata.

     Plates in Volume II: View of Halifax (frontispiece), Shubenacadie Canal (Plan); Island of St. Paul; Government-House, Frederickton; Grand Falls, River St. John; Barracks and Market, Frederickton; View on the Kennebeckasis; Project Survey of Four Townships for Emigrants.

FIRST EDITION. TPL 1627. Lande 1594. Sabin 6848.                                            $1,500.00

 

Early Massachusetts Almanac, with Manuscript Notes and Observations

By the First Minister of the First Church in Needham

 

25.   [Bowen, Nathaniel]: THE NEW-ENGLAND DIARY, OR, ALMANACK FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD CHRIST, 1728... BY A NATIVE OF NEW-ENGLAND. Boston: Printed by B. Green, 1728 [i.e., 1727?]. [16]pp, plus interleaves. 'M D C C X X V I I I' printed at head of title. With the contemporary ownership signature, 'Jonathan Townsend's 1728' and his copious marginalia and interleaved notes. Modern mottled calf, gilt-ruled spine and gilt-lettered spine title. Two gatherings sprung, one small hole affects three letters and a number in the July-August leaf. Very Good.

 

     This printing of a scarce, early Massachusetts almanac, "unlike most of the earlier ones, is unsigned, but has all the characteristics of the work of Nathaniel Bowen, to whom the entire series is attributed" [Evans]. Its owner, Reverend Townsend [1697-1762], was the first minister of Needham, Massachusetts, beginning in 1719. A Harvard graduate with the class of 1716, he makes many notes and observations, some of which are in his personal code, for which he provides explanations in the final leaf.

     On January 30 he writes at the foot of the title page, "about one a clock P.M. our house shook, & windows jarr'd." At the foot of page [3]: "The Empr of China appointed a four days fast when the Earthquake was in his Empire, Oct. 10. 1728 and shook down sundry buildings." For January 10: "My Daughter Jane born this day, about Noon." March 21: "A Publick Fast." April 11: "Mr. John Adams ordain'd at Newport on Rhode Island." April 14: "Natick. Baptized 21 persons." June 28: "Cambridge Commencement.. October 11: "K. George, II, Crown'd King of England, &c. 1727." October 31: "The Crown Court meets at Salem, upon an adjournment." November 7: "Thanksgiving Day." At the foot of the calendar for June: "June 26, 1728. A Fast at Dedham upon the account of the Want of rain. I preached A.M. for Amos: 7.2... God was pleas'd to send Down a plentiful rain the week after, for several days." At the foot of the September calendar: "This Fall a good deal of Cyder made in the town, Needham, more than ever was made before in a Year." The middle interleaves list every place and date that Townsend preached during the year, noting the relevant text. The final leaf, "Charactorum Explanatio, 1728," lists 81 characters and their meanings, for Townsend's daily notations.        

Evans 2845. Drake 3024.                                                                                            $1,750.00

 

The “Virginia Doctrine” Expounded

 

26.   Brockenbrough, W.H.: THE RIGHT OF INSTRUCTION. THE VIRGINIA DOCTRINE CONSIDERED. BEING AN ANSWER TO THE LETTERS OF JUDGE JOSEPH HOPKINSON. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER. Charlottesville, Va.: Printed by James Alexander, 1837. Disbound. Clean closed tear on title page expertly repaired on blank verso without loss, barely noticeable from the recto. 54, [2 blanks] pp. Light toning and mild foxing. Else Very Good.

 

     This scarce pamphlet addresses the power of a State Legislature to control the vote of its United States Senator. Brockenbrough supports the Virginia Doctrine, which deemed legislative instruction "an authoritative lawful command." The power to instruct was based on the Constitutional requirement that U.S. Senators be chosen by the State's legislature, rather than [as today] by the people.

     Brockenbrough argues that, once instructed, a Senator's "only option which we allow him is that of resigning or obeying." For, "wherever a Constitution rests the power to elect a Representative, there lies the power to instruct." Brockenbrough examines early Virginia and American history, particularly the conduct of Patrick Henry and John Marshall, in support of the Virginia Doctrine.

Cohen 4906. Haynes 2159. OCLC 6478800 [8] as of March 2017.                          $950.00

 

“You Propose to Turn the Brutal Negro upon Unsuspecting White Men

And the Defensless [sic] White Woman” 

 

27.   Brownlow, William: BROWNLOW'S LETTER TO PRYNE. [Knoxville: May 8, 1860]. Folio broadside, printed in two columns. 8-1/4" x 21". Signed and dated in type at the end, "W.G. Brownlow, Editor Knoxville Whig. May 8, 1860." Old folds with some loss, costing portions of about a dozen words. A Good copy of a rare, evidently unrecorded, and perhaps unique survival of the bombastic Brownlow's 1860 broadside pillorying his anti-slavery opponent.

 

     Of Brownlow DAB writes, "When not in controversy he was a peaceful and charming man, but his fearless and ruthless honesty in expressing his opinions made him always a storm center." A passionate advocate of whatever side he happened to choose, Brownlow bounced around on the issue of Slavery. Despite his abolitionist sentiments during the 1830's and 1840's, by the time of his debates with Pryne he had become four-square for Slavery. During the Civil War, as a strong pro-Union man, and afterwards, as Reconstruction Governor of Tennessee, he returned to the abolitionist fold.

     Abram Pryne was a New York State Congregational minister and an abolitionist. He was no match for Brownlow's slashing, satirical, uninhibited invective. Their first clash occurred in Philadelphia in late 1858. Here he writes to Pryne, "I owe you an apology for not having disturbed your peace and quiet, as you repose in the sweet-scented family of Fred Douglas, editing his dirty abolition paper, rendered still more filthy, false and infamous under your editorial management..." Damning him for the John Brown raid, he charges, "You propose to turn the brutal negro upon unsuspecting white men and the defensless [sic] white woman, and see them gloat on murder and rapine... Ask God to forgive you for your wickedness-- praying morning, evening and noon, with your face towards Harper's Ferry!"

Not in Sabin, Allen, Webb ["Not in Allen"]. Not located on OCLC or online sites of U TN, Vanderbilt, AAS, Harvard, Yale, Brown as of March 2017.                                          $1,750.00

 

Rare American Broadside: A Loyalist’s Description of the Battle of Bunker Hill

 

28.   [Bunker Hill]: BOSTON, 26TH OF JUNE, 1775. THIS TOWN WAS ALARMED ON THE 17TH INSTANT AT BREAK OF DAY, BY A FIRING FROM THE LIVELY SHIP OF WAR; AND A REPORT WAS IMMEDIATELY SPREAD THAT THE REBELS HAD BROKEN GROUND, AND WERE RAISING A BATTERY ON THE HEIGHTS OF THE PENINSULA OF CHARLESTOWN, AGAINST THE TOWN OF BOSTON... [Boston: Printed by John Howe, 1775]. Folio broadside, 36cm x 22cm. Thomas W. Streeter's copy, with his small sticker on the blank verso. Near Fine.

 

     "British account of the battle of Bunker Hill" [ESTC]. The printer, John Howe [1754-1835], was a Loyalist; he witnessed the Battle and wrote this scarce broadside. Recording the responses of British Generals Howe and Pigot as American troops amassed, he describes the heroic British assault on the American left flank: "notwithstanding various Impediments of Fences, Walls, &c. and the heavy Fire they were exposed to, from the vast Numbers of Rebels, and their Left galled from the Houses of Charlestown, the Troops made their Way to the Redoubt, mounted the Works, and carried it. The Rebels were then forced from other strong Holds, and pursued 'till they were drove clear of the Peninsula, leaving Five Pieces of Cannon behind them."

     "This Action has shown the Bravery of the King's Troops, who under every Disadvantage, gained a compleat Victory over Three Times their Number, strongly posted, and covered by Breastworks. But they fought for their KING, their LAWS and CONSTITUTION."

Evans 13842. ESTC W9549. Streeter Sale 760, with illustration at page 563.         $20,000.00

 

Scarce Account of Virginia

 

29.   Burk, John: THE HISTORY OF VIRGINIA, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE REVOLUTION. IN THREE VOLUMES. Petersburg, Virginia: [Vols. I & II: Dickson & Pescud; Vol. III: John Dickson], 1822. Three volumes, volume III with a folding table after page 88. [2], ii, iv, 348; 335, [1 blank], lxii; 469 pp. Untrimmed, occasional spotting and mild wear. Bound in original paper-covered boards, with contemporary handwritten spine titles on paper labels. Very Good plus.

 

     Burk dedicates the book -- comprised of the sheets of the originally published 1804 printing, with new title pages -- to Thomas Jefferson. The author emphasizes the crucial role of Virginia in the establishment of the Nation. "By her population and geographical position, as well as the public spirit and intelligence of her citizens, she stands conspicuous in the confederacy, which her valor hath erected, in common with that of her sister states; and which her spirit and constancy have since improved and supported."

     "The author dedicates his work to Jefferson, whose ardent disciple he was, and through whose influence he had access to official records, many of which are now lost. In consequence his lengthy appendices are of the highest historical importance" [134 Eberstadt 633, discussing the first edition].

SECOND EDITION. Haynes 2498. 50 Decker 40. See Howes B971 and Church 1298 [first edition].                                                                                                                   $2,250.00

 

Broderick vs. Gwin

 

30.   [California]: PROCEEDINGS OF A PUBLIC MEETING OF THE DEMOCRATIC MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE OF CALIFORNIA, OPPOSED TO THE ELECTION OF A UNITED STATES SENATOR AT THE PRESENT SESSION OF THE LEGISLATURE, HELD IN THE SENATE CHAMBER AT BENICIA, ON THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 2, 1854. San Francisco: Placer Times and Transcript Office, 1854. 8pp, attractive modern quarter calf and marbled boards, gilt spine lettering. Very Good.

 

     A significant chapter in the epic Gwin-Broderick struggle, which split the California Democratic Party on the Kansas-Nebraska issue and ended only with Broderick's death in a duel with Chief Justice David Terry of the California Supreme Court. At the time of this public meeting, Broderick was President of the California Senate and sought to engineer his own election to the U.S. Senate to replace Senator Gwin, whose term would expire on March 4, 1855. These California Democrats resist the attempt to steamroll Broderick's election, arguing that only "the Legislature next preceding a new senatorial term, has the right to elect."

     Eberstadt says, "The 'public meeting' was held in the Senate Chamber at Benicia and the proceedings give a clear insight into local politics just prior to vigilante days."

Cowan 502. Greenwood 491 [1- CU-B]. 136 Eberstadt 157. OCLC 21658923 [6- 4 in CA, Yale, KY Hist. Soc.] as of March 2017.                                                                      $850.00

 

“The State Itself Will Totter, and, At Last, Fall Into Ruins”

 

31.   [Capper, Reverend F.?]: AN ADDRESS TO THE COMMON SENSE AND UNDERSTANDING OF THE PEOPLE; SHEWING, THAT THE REPEAL OF THE TEST ACT MUST BE NECESSARILY ATTENDED WITH THE GREATEST DANGERS BOTH TO CHURCH AND STATE. Ipswich: Printed and Sold by J. Bush, Bookseller, 1790. 19, [1 blank] pp, with the half title. Spine reinforced, Very Good.

 

     The British Test Acts disqualified from public office any person who did not take the oath of allegiance to the Crown and the Church of England. Roman Catholics and other nonconformists were subjected to various civil disabilities. The author warns against "every endeavor to overthrow the present Establishment of the Church of England." Should such an effort succeed "the State itself will totter, and, at last, fall into ruins... Our religious Tenets, and civil Interests are so intimately connected, and are so united in one bond, that it is impossible to separate them." Toleration will result in Dissenters' "open and hasty strides for Equality, as they term it; but in fact, for Superiority; and which will prove to be the case, if the Barrier be once thrown down between us." The result will be Sedition.

ESTC T3162. OCLC shows nine locations as of April 2017.                                    $275.00

 

Heretical Baptists’ “Fanaticism Leads Them into an Abyss

Of Fathomless Proportions”

 

32.   Central Baptist Association of Mississippi: MINUTES OF THE FIFTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE CENTRAL BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, HELD WITH THE CHURCH AT JACKSON, HINDS COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, OCTOBER 12TH, 13TH AND 15TH, 1860. Jackson, Miss.: Mississippi Baptist Book and Job Office, 1860. 27, [2], [3 blanks] pp. Original printed wrappers with wrapper title, as issued. Front wrapper with light fore-edge chipping, Very Good.

 

     An accounting of the doings of this final Session before Civil War. The name and "post office" of each participant is printed, with the churches represented. Reports from each constituent church are printed. One notes, "In the West, Union Churches of Baptist and pedobaptists have been formed upon the basis of hostility to our civil institutions. Their fanaticism leads them into an abyss of fathomless proportions." Reports on Foreign and Domestic Missions, the Central Female Institute, Publications, are also printed.

Not in Owen.                                                                                                              $250.00

 

 

 

 

“Free Education to the Daughters of All Our Citizens”

 

33.   [Charleston]: REPORT OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF FREE SCHOOLS TO THE CITIZENS OF CHARLESTON. PRESENTED JULY 4, 1859. Charleston, S.C.: Steam Power Press of Walker, Evans & Co. 1859. Original printed wrappers [lightly spotted], stitched. 31, [1 blank] pp, preceded by an engraving frontis of the Normal and High School, and two pages of floor plans for the school. Occasional foxing, Very Good.

 

     C.G. Memminger was chairman of the Board. "This day commemorates the third anniversary of our Common Schools." With statistical data, reports of Committees of each school; and material on the Girls' High and Normal School, which "offers free education to the daughters of all our citizens. The course of studies is intended to embrace the whole curriculum of a liberal education, and we have endeavored to surround the School with the influences which taste and comfort lend their aid to contribute."

     A valuable and scarce resource for pre-War public education in the South.

II Turnbull 287. Sabin 12074.                                                                                    $450.00

 

Rulers “Are Bounded by the Constitution, and Obliged to Keep

Within the Proper Limits Assigned Them”

 

34.   Chauncy, Charles: CIVIL MAGISTRATES MUST BE JUST, RULING IN THE FEAR OF GOD. A SERMON PREACHED BEFORE HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM SHIRLEY, ESQ; THE HONOURABLE HIS MAJESTY'S COUNCIL, AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, OF THE PROVINCE OF THE MASSACHUSETTS-BAY IN N. ENGLAND; MAY 27. 1747. BEING THE ANNIVERSARY FOR THE ELECTION OF HIS MAJESTY'S COUNCIL FOR SAID PROVINCE. Boston: Printed by Order of the Honourable House of Representatives, 1747. [3]-69, [2], [1 blank] pp. Attractive typographic ornamentation. Lacking the half title [but including the Appendix], released from AAS collection, with its rubberstamp on title page. Else Very Good.

 

     This American patriot, a friend of the American Revolution and a foe of the Church of England's establishment in America, warns Great Britain on its treatment of the American colonies, expressing a sophisticated understanding of the nature of government and the natural rights of mankind. God has commanded rulers to be just "for the general good of mankind; to keep confusion and disorder out of the world; to guard men's lives; to secure their rights; to defend their properties and liberties; to make their way to justice easy, and yet effectual, for their protection when innocent, and their relief when injuriously treated; and, in a word, to maintain peace and good order, and in general, to promote the public Welfare." 

     Rulers are subject to Law. They "are bounded by the constitution, and obliged to keep within the proper limits assigned them," including those imposed by the British Constitution's division of power, and checks and balances. A government's descent into "violence and tyranny" is "to be dreaded and deprecated." For rulers who have "misused their power, sad will be their account another day. It will not be any security them, that they were once ranked among the great men of the earth."

FIRST EDITION. Evans 5919. Sabin 12313.                                                                        $1,250.00

 

Scarce, Early, Popular Latin Grammar

 

35.   [Cheever, Ezekiel]: A SHORT INTRODUCTION TO THE LATIN TONGUE: FOR THE USE OF THE LOWER FORMS IN THE LATIN SCHOOL. BEING THE ACCIDENCE, ABRIDGED AND COMPILED IN THE MOST EASY AND ACCURATE METHOD, WHEREIN THE FAMOUS MR. EZEKIEL CHEEVER TAUGHT, AND WHICH HE FOUND THE MOST ADVANTAGEOUS BY SEVENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE. TO WHICH IS ADDED, A CATALOGUE OF IRREGULAR NOUNS, AND VERBS, DISPOSED ALPHABETICALLY. THE FIFTEENTH EDITION. Boston: Isaiah Thomas, in Union-Street, 1771. Contemporary calf [spine worn, some wear]. 72pp. Very Good.

 

     "Based on the teachings of Cheever and published posthumously. Compiled either by Ezekiel Lewis or by Nathaniel Williams" [NAIP]. The first of about twenty American printings appeared in 1709. This rare edition is a variant of Evans 12227, which was "Printed by Isaiah Thomas, for John Perkins, on Union-Street." Evans did not record it. It is one of the earliest Isaiah Thomas imprints; NAIP records it as his first printed work in excess of 56 pages.

Bristol B3334. Shipton & Mooney 42225. Not in Evans. NAIP w003292 [6].         $1,250.00

 

Chicago as a Pre-Fire Financial Center

 

36.   Chicago Ante-Fire Imprints: A COLLECTION OF ELEVEN CHICAGO DAILY FINANCIAL SHEETS FROM BANKING HOUSES. Chicago: 1868. Broadsides of various sizes, no printers listed. Some occasional minor wear, Very Good.

 

     The financial sheets quote daily prices for stocks and bonds in Chicago. They suggest Chicago's emergence as a center of trade and finance before the Great Fire. The sheets include Tyler, Ullman & Co., Daily Quotations; and Opening Quotations from the Banking House of Lunt, Preston & Kean.

     These banking firms were established during the early 1860's and quickly became an important financial force in building and, after the Great Fire, rebuilding the City of Chicago. Scripps, Preston & Kean was involved in the first government loan issued for the prosecution of the Civil War. [Howe: CHICAGO COMMERCE, MANUFACTURES, BANKING AND TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES. Chicago: 1884.]                                                $750.00

 

“Vitriolic Indictment of the Confederacy”

 

37.   [Civil War]: ARMS OF YE CONFEDERACIE. [Philadelphia?]: G. H. Heap Inv. [1862?]. Engraving on off-white card, 4-3/4" x 4". "G.H. Heap Inv. H.H. Tilley Del. et Sc." Very Good.

 

     "A small card bearing a vitriolic indictment of the Confederacy. The artist particularly attacks the institution of slavery... A large shield is flanked by two figures: a planter (left) and a slave. The planter wears spurs and a broad-brimmed hat and smokes a cigar. The slave is clad only in breeches, and his hands are manacled. Above the shield are two crossed flags, the Confederate flag and one bearing a skull and crossbones and the number 290. Between the flags are a rooster and a streamer with the motto 'servitudo esto perpetua.' On the shield are images associated with the South: a mint julep, a bottle of 'Old Rye,' a pistol and dagger, a whip and manacles, cotton, tobacco, and sugar plants, and slaves hoeing. In the background left, dominated by the palmetto tree of South Carolina, three planters, one holding a whip, play cards at a table. Beyond, two men duel with pistols. On the right, a female slave is auctioned as two slave children stand by." [Reilly].

Reilly 1862-13. OCLC records five locations under three accession numbers [Penn. State, U So. Car., Lib. Cong., MA Hist., W Res. Hist. Soc.] as of April 2017.                     $1,000.00

 

“Warlike and Treasonable Acts”

 

38.   [Civil War]: WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE WAR? WHO ACCOUNTABLE FOR ITS HORRORS AND DESOLATIONS? [New York? 1864?]. Broadside, 9-1/8" x 11-1/2". Printed in two columns, Very Good.

 

     AAS’s description of this broadside states that the words at its foot, "For sale by all news agents. Price, $1 per 100," repeat those of several 1864 Republican campaign broadsides published by the National Union Executive Committee, Astor House, New York. "Presumably this edition was also published by the Republican Party's national committee."

     This broadside begins with "EXTRACTS from a Speech by ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS (now Vice-President of the Confederate States), delivered in the Secession Convention of Georgia, on the 31st day of January, 1861: 'This step (the secession of Georgia,) once taken, can never be recalled; and all the baleful and withering consequences that must follow (as you will see) will rest on the Convention for all coming time... To attempt to overthrow such a Government as this... is the height of madness, folly, and wickedness, to which I can neither lend my sanction nor my vote'." In his 1868 book, 'A Constitutional View of the Late War Between the States,' Stephens declared the Speech to be a "fabrication."

     There follows an answer to the question, 'WHO COMMENCED THE WAR?' "Those who would throw the guilt of the war upon the shoulders of Mr. Lincoln, are requested to read the following catalogue of 'remarkable events,' published in a Southern Almanac, all of which occurred during the Presidency of Mr. Buchanan." The "Catalogue" is a list of aggressions committed by the Southern States. "All these were warlike and treasonable acts."

De Renne 1316. Not in Sabin, Bartlett, Nevins, Eberstadt, LCP, Monaghan. OCLC shows a number of institutional locations.                                                                         $850.00

 

Civil War Draftees in Pennsylvania

 

39.   [Civil War Draft in Indiana County, Pennsylvania]: THE DRAFT IN INDIANA COUNTY. BELOW WE GIVE A COMPLETE LIST OF THE PERSONS DRAFTED FROM INDIANA COUNTY, UNDER THE CONSCRIPTION ACT, AT GREENSBURG, ON THE 13TH INST. [np: @1864]. Broadside, 8" x 18", printed in six columns, about a thousand names listed by township. Several fox spots, old folds, a pinhole or two, else Very Good.

 

     An evidently unrecorded and perhaps unique broadside listing the names of draftees under the Conscription Act for this Pennsylvania county.

Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.                                                                   $600.00

 

40.   [Civil War - Slavery Postal Covers]: FOUR UNUSED UNION POSTAL COVERS WITH CARICATURED IMAGES OF SLAVES. [vp: 1861-1865]. 5-5/8" x 3-1/8". Very Good.

 

     1. An old Negro stands next to George Washington, who is pulling down the American flag, and says to him: "I wouldn't pull down dat Flag, Massa George; you will nebber forgib yerself as long as you lib, if you do. [New York: John G. Wells. 1861]

Weiss C-BL-73.

     2. "Massa Butler, we's just SECEDED from Harpers Ferry, whar we larn'd de trade ob making TRENCHES and FORTI'CATIONS. And now if yer wants anything done in dat ar line ob bisness, we's de Niggers to call upon."

Weiss C-BL-67

     3. Outside Fort Monroe an overseer, whip in hand, calls out, "Come back here, you black rascal." The slave replies, "Can't come back no how, massa, Dis chile's CONTRABAN'." Other Negroes in the background.

Weiss C-BL-77

     4. "Map of the SEAT OF WAR. Published by James Gates, Cincinnati, O." The map and accompanying "Directions" depict various places in Maryland and Virginia. A Negro says, "I's de INNOCENT CAUSE ob all dis WAR TRUBBLE."

Weiss C-BL-79.                                                                                                          $500.00

 

Rare Circular Endorsing De Witt Clinton for

Governor of New York

 

41.   [Clinton, De Witt]: (CIRCULAR.) NEW YORK. [Nov. 10] 18[19]. TO [Joseph W. Moulton, Esquire] SIR, AS MEMBERS OF THE GREAT REPUBLICAN FAMILY TO WHICH YOU BELONG, WE TAKE THE LIBERTY OF PRESENTING YOU WITH OUR VIEWS, IN RELATION TO THE NEW-YORK-STATE GOVERNMENT, AND THE OPPOSITION ARRAYED AGAINST IT AT THE PRESENT MOMENT... [New York: 1819]. Folio sheet folded to 7 3/4" x 12 1/2", with caption title [as issued]. [3], [1 blank] pp. Items in parentheses are in manuscript; the rest is in print. Several fold splits and expert repairs [no text loss]. Good+. The addressee, at the head of the title and on blank page [4] is Joseph W. Moulton of Buffalo, with Albany postal cancel.

 

     Robert Bogardus and nine other members of the "Correspondence Committee for the City & County of N. York" sign this circular in type at the end of page [3]. They urge the re-election of De Witt Clinton as Governor, citing his accomplishments: establishment of the Board of Agriculture, the Great Western Canal, and the Northern Canal; a laudable economy in government; development of "our learned institutions"; and other achievements. "Under the present Administration, the great state of New-York has been elevated and ennobled in the eyes of the union and of the civilized world."

     This rare item is evidently located only at the New York Historical Society.

Not in Sabin or American Imprints. OCLC 79437950 [1] as of March 2017.           $500.00

 

An Attack on “Gallic Usurpers”

 

42.   Cobbett, William: PORCUPINE'S POLITICAL CENSOR, FOR NOVEMBER 1796. CONTAINING OBSERVATIONS ON THE INSOLENT AND SEDITIOUS NOTES, COMMUNICATED TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES BY THE LATE FRENCH MINISTER ADET. Philadelphia: Printed for, and sold by, William Cobbett. Nov. 1796. 78 pp. Disbound, else Very Good.

 

     Cobbett's blistering attack on the "Gallic usurpers" and especially Minister Adet, with a strong defense of President Washington and his stewardship of foreign policy. Adet, egged on by the Francophiles in Washington's administration (particularly Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe), had abused his hospitality in this country by publicly attacking the Treaty with England, which would supplant France with England as America's chief ally. Gaines [Cobbett] writes that the pamphlet contains "a careful discussion of treaties." Cobbett describes Jefferson as "a Frenchman in politics and morality."

Evans 30226. Gaines (Concealed Authorship) 96-55. Gaines (Cobbett) 25a.           $175.00

 

A Parody of Lincoln’s “Dismally Trite” Pre-Inauguration Speeches

 

43.   [Confederate (?) Broadside Verse]: THERE'S "NO BODY" HURT!! [Richmond? @1861]. Illustration at head of verse: man in top hat wears a poster that bears the title. Printed on white paper with black ink, text within ornamental border. 4-1/2" x 7-3/4". Trimmed closely to the border, mounted, minor wear. Very Good.

 

     A scarce broadside poem which begins, "There lives a man at Washington, A narrow-minded squirt..." The poem is an unfavorable critique of Abraham Lincoln. It "contains satire aimed at the President, who, it was said, repeated these words" [Semmes, 'Civil War Song Sheets,' in Maryland Historical Magazine, September 1943, page 218-219, footnote 19]. As President-Elect, Lincoln made several speeches on the way to Washington, seeking to calm the country. But his words were, as his biographer Stephen Oakes said, "Dismally trite." Lincoln said at Columbus, "There is nothing going wrong... Nobody is suffering anything." At Pittsburgh: "There is no crisis except an artificial one."

     Several institutional collections consider this a Confederate imprint. That may be so, but there were plenty of criticisms of Lincoln within the Union-- especially early in his administration. Neither Parrish & Willingham, Crandall, nor Hummel records it.

Wake Forest Confederate Broadside Collection. Rubenstein Library at Duke University #bsvg200626. Getty Library Civil War Collection. See, Oakes, With Malice Toward None [Harper Perennial Edition, page 209].                                                                        $350.00

 

44.   [Confederate Sheet Music] Kelp, Joseph: POPULAR SONG AND CHORUS AD LIB. AURA LEA OR THE MAID WITH GOLDEN HAIR. ARRANGED BY JOSEPH KELP. Richmond: Lithographed and Published by Geo. Dunn & Compy. [1864]. 9-1/4" x 11-1/2", with decorated title page. [4] pp, words and music. Light to moderate foxing, Good+.

Parrish & Willingham 6813.                                                                                       $250.00

 

Connecticut’s Mess in the Western Reserve

 

45.   [Connecticut Western Reserve]: WHEREAS AT A GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, HOLDEN AT NEW-HAVEN, ON THE SECOND THURSDAY OF OCTOBER, 1796, AN ACT WAS PASSED FOR INCORPORATING THE PROPRIETORS OF THE HALF MILLION ACRES OF LAND, LYING SOUTH OF LAKE ERIE, WHICH ACT IMPOWERED THE AGENTS OF SAID PROPRIETORS IN GENERAL MEETING ASSEMBLED, TO LAY TAXES ON SAID PROPRIETORS, AND TO APPOINT THE TIMES WHEN PAYABLE; AND ALSO IMPOWERED THE COLLECTORS OF SAID PROPRIETORS TO MAKE SALE OF THE RIGHTS OF SUCH PARTS THEREOF, AS SHOULD BE SUFFICIENT TO DISCHARGE THE TAX OR TAXES, WHICH THE PROPRIETOR OR PROPRIETORS OF RIGHTS MIGHT NEGLECT OR REFUSE TO PAY... [Hartford? 1797-1799]. Printed folio broadside, 7-3/8" x 12-1/4", completed in manuscript and docketed in manuscript on verso. Old folds, light foxing, else Very Good. An evidently unrecorded document on Connecticut claims to the Western Reserve, not located on ESTC, OCLC, or NAIP as of March 2017.

 

       "A general meeting of the agents of said proprietors, held at Hartford, on the 17th May, 1797," established a schedule of taxes. But Frances Bradley of Fairfield, failed to pay. Thus, on January 15, 1798, her property was sold for the amount of unpaid taxes to Walter Terry of Fairfield. Lothrop Lewis of Fairfield, the tax collector, here officially transfers the property. His deed, dated March 30, 1799, is acknowledged on April 5, 1799. Lothrop Lewis, whose name is printed, also signs in ink; witnesses were Lewis Sturges and Samuel Rowland.

     In 1786 Connecticut relinquished claims to land west of Pennsylvania except for the Western Reserve, a portion of what is now south of Lake Erie in northeast Ohio. Connecticut assigned some of the Reserve to its citizens as compensation for losses suffered during the Revolution; and sold the rest to a consortium of Connecticut men, including Moses Cleaveland, who had formed the Connecticut Land Company. Their speculations were not successful, there being no effective local government in the Reserve capable of unraveling the tangle of land titles. Taxes imposed were frequently uncollected. To force payment of the tax, on January 15, 1798 Lothrop Lewis conducted the sales. [Carpenter: ORIGIN AND LOCATION OF THE FIRELANDS OF THE WESTERN RESERVE, Ohio Archeological and Historical Quarterly, Volume 44, April, 1935, page180.]

     Lothrop [a/k/a Lathrop] Lewis [1759-1817], born in Fairfield, was its tax collector for many years. Lewis B[urr] Sturges [1763-1844], born in Fairfield, graduated from Yale, was clerk of the Probate Court from 1787 to 1791, a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from 1794 to 1803; and a Federalist Congressman from 1805 to 1816. He spent his later years in Ohio. Samuel Rowland [1769-1837] was born in Fairfield, admitted to the bar in 1794, was a lawyer and town clerk for 42 years, and turnpike surveyor to the New York State line. [Perry: THE OLD BURYING GROUND OF FAIRFIELD, CONN... 1882, p.164.]                                                                                                                         $500.00

 

Pennsylvania an “Asylum from Civil Persecution and

Religious Intolerance”

 

46.   [Cooper, Thomas]: THOUGHTS ON EMIGRATION, IN A LETTER FROM A GENTLEMAN IN PHILADELPHIA, TO HIS FRIEND IN ENGLAND. London: 1794. [2], 17 pp, as issued. Mild toning, Very Good. In modern marbled wrappers, with printed title label pasted on front wrapper. Housed in an attractive quarter morocco slipcase.

 

     As a young adult in his native England, "Cooper was intimately involved in contemporary political issues. He became well-known as a lawyer of radical political sentiments." Warned "against seditious speech, Cooper visited the United States in 1793 to prepare a haven for English dissenters. Cooper and his family soon made their visit to the United States permanent by moving to Northumberland, Pennsylvania in 1794." ['Penn Biographies', online archives.upenn.edu].

     Here he arranged to publish this pamphlet anonymously, to encourage emigration of persons seeking "asylum from civil persecution and religious intolerance," "opponents of the present government in England, as being inconsistent with the principles of liberty, and... opponents also of the slave- trade." Since most such prospective emigrants opposed slavery, he advises against settling in the Deep South and assures them that land and opportunity abound elsewhere. Cooper examines advantages and disadvantages of all the States-- focusing particularly on economic opportunity, slavery, climate, land costs, and amenities. Eberstadt summarizes: "Describes the respective merits of lands and inducements to settlement in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky. The latter two territories, while offering many advantages, are deemed unsafe because of the frequent Indian incursions." Cooper concludes that his own Pennsylvania [where, perhaps not coincidentally, he had recently purchased several hundred thousand acres] is the best.

FIRST EDITION. 123 Eberstadt 39. Sabin 95678. ESTC N46500. OCLC records nine locations under several accession numbers as of February 2017.                                $1,500.00

 

Opposition to Republicans’ Raising Negro Troops, “Both Slave and Free”

 

47.   [Copperheads]: CONGRESSIONAL ADDRESS. Washington, D.C.: July, 1864. 32pp, entirely uncut, untrimmed, folded elephant folio leaf. Light tan and fox, Very Good. Signed in type by C.R. Buckalew and forty-two other members of the Thirty-Eighth Congress.

    

     Border-State Democrats and midwest Copperheads attack the Republican Party's "aggressive" enhancement of power and destruction of civil liberties. The Democratic Party, "which ordinarily has administered the Government of the United States...did not fall into gross abuse or threaten the liberties of the country." But Republicans favor "extreme action by the General Government, favoritism to particular interests, usurpation of State powers," military interference with pending elections, and creation of "bogus States" [i.e., West Virginia] to further their political designs.

     Of "particular notice" is the raising of Negro troops, "both slave and free," who would enjoy equality with white troops "as to compensation and supplies." Buckalew and his colleagues object to the use of "an enormous number of undisciplined and ignorant negroes." The "corruption" caused by "the negro or other inferior race, who may be casually or permanently placed among us" is a major danger of the War.

FIRST EDITION. Sabin 15600. Not in Bartlett, LCP, Monaghan, Eberstadt.          $375.00

 

A Bitter Philadelphian Resents Removal of the Capital City to Washington,

“Neither Town nor Village… A Few Scattered Hamlets”

 

48.   Crito [pseud.]: CRITO'S LETTERS, TO THE ELECTORS OF THE UNITED STATES, ON THE COMMERCIAL REPRESENTATION AND THE SEAT OF GOVERNMENT. Philadelphia: Printed by Bartram and Reynolds, 1807. 26pp. Stitched, untrimmed, generously margined. Uniform light toning, dusting to outer margins, numerical rubberstamp on blank portion of title page. AAS records this item with a half title, lacking here. Except as noted, Very Good.

 

       The pseudonymous author's Letters protest Philadelphia's diminished influence in the national councils. Although Philadelphians-- "good easy souls"-- supposedly "have a voice in sending three members to Congress," in fact their impact is severely diluted by the Counties of Philadelphia and Delaware, which are included in the same electoral district. He despairs at the absence of "the lantern of Diogenes, to enable us to find a suitable deputy to the National Legislature."

     Crito resents the removal of the Capital City from Philadelphia to Washington, which is "neither town nor village... A few scattered hamlets, here and there, indicate a sordid, and dependent population... There sits the President, during the summer recess-- like a pelican in the wilderness or a sparrow upon the house top." The history, commerce, and importance of Philadelphia demonstrate that it deserves to be the Nation's Capital.  

AI 12373 [6]. OCLC records seven locations under three accession numbers as of January 2017. Not in Gaines.                                                                                                            $350.00

 

The Republican Party in Bed with the Southern Pacific RR

 

49.   Crocker, Charles F.: LETTER SIGNED, 25 AUGUST 1884 ON SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD LETTERHEAD, TO STEPHEN B. ELKINS, CHAIRMAN OF THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE, Four leaves, written in neat ink manuscript on rectos only, docketed on verso of last leaf. Signed in ink by Crocker at the end, with a different pen and in a different hand from the text. Near Fine.

 

      Crocker, one of the Big Four railroad men, writes a long, detailed letter to Elkins. A major figure in the Republican Party, Elkins was a wealthy lawyer and industrialist who made his money in railroads, mining, and real estate in New Mexico, and then in West Virginia. He had been New Mexico's territorial delegate to Congress, and would later become Secretary of War. The city of Elkins, West Virginia, bears his name. He managed James Blaine's campaign for the presidency in 1884.

     Crocker begins by thanking Elkins for seeing to the interests of the Southern Pacific by "securing a conservative State Platform... Our corporate interests now lie in the success of the Republican Ticket, for which we are exerting ourselves to make a clean sweep." The Ticket, he says, "will help us materially in carrying the State for Blaine and Logan." Crocker worries mainly about the Republican Congressional candidate in San Francisco-- "the united colored vote of this city" is strongly for his Democratic opponent. Crocker urges a major effort to overturn this unreasonable allegiance.                                                                     $500.00

 

50.   Currier & Ives: THE OLD BULL DOG ON THE RIGHT TRACK. New York: Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St., [1864]. Lithograph broadside, 17-1/2" x 13-1/2". Minor blank corner wear. A scarce and imaginative political satire. Near Fine.

 

     "An election year cartoon measuring Democratic candidate McClellan's military failures against the recent successes of his successor, Ulysses S. Grant. At right Grant, portrayed as a bulldog wearing a collar labeled 'Lieut. General' and epaulets, sits pugnaciously on the tracks of the 'Weldon Railroad,' a Confederate supply route. He looks to Republican presidential incumbent Abraham Lincoln and boasts, 'I'm bound to take it.' Grant refers to the city of Richmond, here represented by a doghouse, in which cowers Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Davis, flanked by his own generals Lee (left) and Beauregard, remarks, 'You aint got this kennel yet old fellow!' Several other dogs hide behind the house.

     "At far left a dwarf-like McClellan asks the president, '. . . don't you think you had better call the old dog off now. I'm afraid he'll hurt those other dogs, if he catches hold of them.' Lincoln answers, 'Why little Mac thats the same pack of curs, that chased you aboard of the Gunboat two years ago, they are pretty nearly used up now. I think its best to give the old bull dog full swing to go in and finish them!' Lincoln refers to McClellan's failure to counterattack during the Battle of Malvern Hill in 1862... In contrast, Grant aggressively advanced his army toward Richmond, hoping to force a decisive battle" [Reilly].

Weitenkampf 142. Reilly 1864-18. OCLC 191120049 [4- AAS, Peabody-Essex, Clements, UNC] as of February 2017.                                                                                                $2,000.00

 

51.   [Dakota Territory]: 1887. RESOURCES OF DAKOTA. AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION COMPILED BY THE COMMISSIONER OF IMMIGRATION, UNDER AUTHORITY GRANTED BY THE TERRITORIAL LEGISLATURE. CONTAINING DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENTS AND GENERAL INFORMATION RELATING TO THE SOIL, CLIMATE, PRODUCTIONS; ADVANTAGES AND DEVELOPMENT- AGRICULTURAL, MANUFACTURING, COMMERCIAL, AND MINERAL- THE GEOGRAPHY AND TOPOGRAPHY OF THE TERRITORY. THE VACANT PUBLIC LANDS AND HOW TO OBTAIN THEM; TOGETHER WITH DIAGRAMS, STATEMENTS, TABLES AND SUMMARIES SHOWING THE PRODUCTS AND PROGRESS OF THE TERRITORY AND OF EACH COUNTY, SEPARATELY. TERRITORY OF DAKOTA: DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION AND STATISTICS. P.F. McCLURE, COMMISSIONER, PIERRE. Sioux Falls, Dakota: Argus-Leader Company, Printers, 1887. 498pp. Stitched in original printed wrappers [rear wrapper neatly detached]. Frontis illustration of the Capitol at Bismarck; many photo illustrations; "Map showing the known Coal Area of Dakota"; color "Geological Map of the Black Hills of Dakota." Near Fine. Laid in is a contemporary newspaper advertisement for lands in the Red River Valley.

 

     A comprehensive homesteader's guide to the Dakota Territory, covering all the subjects set forth in the title, with many engravings of public buildings, churches, business establishments, schools, prisons, and an enormous amount of statistical information. A thorough index appears at the end.

Allen 497. Adams Herd 2119.                                                                                    $275.00

 

52.   Dalby, Francis: MR. DALBY'S CASE. [London: 1760? 1765?]. 3, [1] pp. Folded folio sheet. Light foxing and horizontal folds, Very Good. Docketed in type on final page, "The Case of Francis Dalby of London, Merchant. Humbly submitted to the Honourable House of Commons of Great Britain."

 

     An illustration of the British government's power to seize private property without paying just compensation. This is a rare "petition addressed to the House of Commons, requesting compensation for the hiring for public service of certain ships owned by Francis Dalby and his father-in-law, Charles Weekes" [ESTC]. Dalby owned the Ship Britannia. In 1743 it sailed from the Isle of Wight with a cargo of wheat, bound for Italy. The British fleet stopped it, seized its cargo for use of the fleet, and used the ship "as a tender in his Majesty's service"-- all without compensation to Dalby. Several other Dalby ships met a similar fate: one was engaged in the Carolina rice trade, another in the West Indian trade. 

    Having "solicited and prosecuted all the means in their power to procure a reasonable satisfaction for the heavy losses," Dalby appeals to "the lenity, justice and beneficent aid of this Honourable House, without which the said Dalby and his family must inevitably be ruined."       

ESTC T144865. OCLC 558667268 [1- British Lib.] as of February 2017.               $450.00

 

Jeff Davis Roots for the Democrats

 

53.   [Davis, Jefferson]: WHAT JEFF. DAVIS THINKS OF THE WAR. [New York: National Union Executive Committee, 1864]. Broadside, 9" x 11 1/2", printed in two columns. Old folds, a bit of foxing, Very Good.

 

     A rare broadside, demonstrating Jefferson Davis's affinity with the Democratic Party, expressed at its Chicago convention. "The main plank of the Chicago Platform is that which pronounces the war a FAILURE, and on that account demands that 'IMMEDIATE EFFORTS BE MADE FOR A CESSATION OF HOSTILITIES'."

     Eberstadt calls this a "scarce piece denouncing the Chicago plank, and airing Davis' views as expressed at Macon, Montgomery, and Richmond. The effectual way to end the war and restore the Union is: VOTE FOR LINCOLN."

FIRST EDITION. 133 Eberstadt 281. OCLC locates seven copies under several accession numbers as of April 2017.                                                                                          $750.00

 

By the Census Agent for Indian Affairs

 

54.   Donaldson, Thomas: EXTRA CENSUS  BULLETIN. INDIANS. THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES OF INDIAN TERRITORY, CHEROKEE NATION, CREEK NATION, SEMINOLE NATION, CHOCTAW NATION, AND CHICKASAW NATION. BY... EXPERT SPECIAL AGENT. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1893. Folio. 116, [2 blanks] pp. The Bulletin consists of "changes and modifications" for the work on the Five Civilized Tribes [the next item].

   [bound with] [Donaldson, Thomas]: EXTRA CENSUS BULLETIN. THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES IN INDIAN TERRITORY: THE CHEROKEE, CHICKASAW, CHOCTAW, CREEK, AND SEMINOLE NATIONS. Washington: 1894. [8], 70, [2 blanks] pp. Plus large folding map, 17 leaves of illustrations.

   [bound with] Donaldson, Thomas: EXTRA CENSUS BULLETIN. INDIANS. EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEES OF NORTH CAROLINA. Washington: 1892. Photo illustration frontis, 24pp, plus two folding maps and nine additional leaves of illustrations. 

   [bound with] Donaldson, Thomas: EXTRA CENSUS BULLETIN. INDIANS. THE SIX NATIONS OF NEW YORK | CAYUGAS, MOHAWKS (SAINT REGIS), ONEIDAS, ONONDAGAS, SENECAS, TUSCARORAS. Washington: 1892. [8], 89, [1 blank] pp. Plus nine maps [six of them folding], 19 leaves of full-page illustrations.

   [bound with] Donaldson, Thomas: EXTRA CENSUS BULLETIN. MOQUI PUEBLO INDIANS OF ARIZONA AND PUEBLO INDIANS OF NEW MEXICO. Washington: 1893. Lovely color frontis illustration, [8], 136 pp. Plus 82 additional full-page illustrations [several in full color], and four maps [one of them folding].

     The five reports, all folio, bound together in modern marbled boards and quarter morocco, with raised spine bands and gilt-stamped spine title. Near Fine.

 

     Five remarkable reports, replete with information on these tribes, by the indefatigable Donaldson, Census Agent in charge of the Indian portion of the Eleventh Census. He collected over 1500 photographs in the course of his duties.                                                    $1,250.00

 

Father of the Blood Bank

 

55.   Drew, Charles: THE ROLE OF SOVIET INVESTIGATORS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BLOOD BANK. [In] AMERICAN REVIEW OF SOVIET MEDICINE, APRIL 1944. New York: Published by the American-Soviet Medical Society, 1944. Drew's article occupies pages 360-369 of the April 1944 issue. We offer the entire Volume I, consisting of four issues totaling 588 pages. Portraits, illustrations, charts, bound in original large 8vo red cloth, gilt spine title lettering. Very Good.

 

     This is the article's first appearance by the father of the American and British blood banks of World War II. Drew became the first African-American to receive a Doctor of Science degree, which he earned for his thesis, written at Columbia, on blood banks. Drew's article acknowledges the early Soviet work in the preservation of blood.                                     $750.00

 

56.   Dwight, Timothy: THE FOLLY, GUILT, AND MISCHIEFS OF DUELLING; A SERMON, PREACHED IN THE COLLEGE CHAPEL AT NEW HAVEN, ON THE SABBATH PRECEDING THE ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT, SEPTEMBER, 1804. BY... PRESIDENT OF YALE-COLLEGE. Hartford: Hudson and Goodwin, 1805. 30pp, but lacking the half title. Untrimmed, removed, Good+.

 

     Dwight's sermon is prefaced by a denial that it was a response to the widely publicized Hamilton-Burr duel. "Whatever may be thought of a late encounter, which has engrossed the attention of this country, it is especially to be remarked, that I do not intend to refer to it at all." Though striving for the big picture, Dwight would probably have conceded that, but for that duel, few would have listened.

     Dwight takes his text from Proverbs: "A man that doeth violence to the blood of any person, shall flee to the pit; let no man stay him."

Ford, Hamiltoniana 114*.                                                                                           $175.00

 

Early vs. Mahone

 

57.   [Early, Jubal A.]: A CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN GENERALS EARLY AND MAHONE, IN REGARD TO A MILITARY MEMOIR OF THE LATTER. [Lynchburg? 1875?]. Caption title [as issued], stitched, top edge untrimmed. Old horizontal folds, else Very Good. 19, [1 blank] pp.

 

     General William Mahone, C.S.A., became a railroad man and a power in Virginia politics after the War. He made enemies; one of them was Early who, Mahone charged, had backed out of a duel with him. Mahone's Memoir, published in the 'Historical Magazine' in 1870, glorified his own conduct and said Early was guilty of "inertion and incompetency" in battle. Old ground-- wartime behavior in various engagements, the detritus of a decade-old feud-- is thoroughly plowed, as Early claims to set the record straight.

     OCLC records two versions, one with a colon after Mahone's name [which it calls the 1871 printing] and the other, scarcer, with a comma, which appears to be ours.

II Dornbusch 2705. OCLC 36847448 [2- Buffalo & Erie County Pub. Lib., U DE], 228687039 [1- Huntington] [as of March 2017]. Not in Haynes, Cappon, Eberstadt, Decker.         $375.00

 

58.   Edwards, Jonathan: ALL DIVINE TRUTH PROFITABLE: ILLUSTRATED IN A SERMON PREACHED AT HAMDEN, JANUARY 11TH, 1792, AT THE ORDINATION OF THE REV. DAN BRADLEY, TO THE PASTORAL CHARGE OF THE FIRST CHURCH IN WHITES-TOWN, IN THE STATE OF NEW-YORK, BY...PASTOR OF A CHURCH IN NEW-HAVEN. New Haven: A. Morse, 1792. 42pp, stitched in contemporary plain pale wrappers [endpapers adhering to inner wraps]. Lightly foxed, Very Good.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 24290.                                                                                $350.00

 

Slavery: “The Dark Gift of European Policy”

 

59.   Election of 1852: PAPERS FOR THE PEOPLE. TO BE ISSUED WEEKLY DURING THE CAMPAIGN. CONTENTS OF NO. I. TRUE DEMOCRATIC PROGRESS. THE NEXT PRESIDENCY. THE COMPROMISE QUESTION. CANDIDATES FOR NOMINATION. THE JEFFERSON UNION. "THE UNION- THE WHOLE UNION!" New York: Office of the Jefferson Union, 1852. Stitched [first leaf loosened], 16pp. Foxed early leaves. Good+.

 

     The first in a series of 1852 Democratic campaign pamphlets. This one extols the Democratic Party as "the inherent progressive force" in the Nation, accommodating all sectional interests, supporting the 1850 Compromise, ending America's early thralldom to Europe, and rendering the United States a continental power. Obviously intended to attract Northern support for the Democrats, the pamphlet says Slavery is "the dark gift of European policy, wherever it is found on our continent, and was only tolerated by our few and feeble Anglo-Saxon colonies as an auxiliary in the conquest of the forest and marsh."

     Canvassing the possible Democratic presidential candidates, the pamphlet gives brief, laudatory biographies of Lewis Cass, Stephen Douglass [sic], James Buchanan, Sam Houston, and William Marcy. Franklin Pierce, who would win the nomination, is not mentioned. 

FIRST EDITION. Sabin 58450. Not in Miles, Eberstadt, Decker.                            $250.00

 

Original Drawings for a Popular Work on Lincoln

 

60.   Eytinge, Solomon Jr.: FOUR ORIGINAL COLOR DRAWINGS BY THE AMERICAN JEWISH ILLUSTRATOR SOLOMON EYTINGE, JR., FOR ENGRAVINGS PRINTED IN "THE BALLAD OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN," PUBLISHED IN 1870 BY FIELDS, OSGOOD & CO. Four hand-colored original drawings, 5 3/4" x 8", on thick stock. Beautifully detailed. Fine.

   [offered with] Taylor, Bayard: THE BALLAD OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN. WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY SOL. EYTINGE, JR., ENGRAVED AND PRINTED IN COLORS BY BOBBETT, HOOPER, & CO., Boston: Fields, Osgood, & Co. 1870. 8pp, with copies of the Eytinge illustrations. The Taylor pamphlet is moderately worn, with occasional small loss.

 

     Solomon Eytinge, Jr., [1833-1905] was a successful American Jewish illustrator whose work appeared in many periodicals, newspapers, and books. Authors whose works he illustrated included his personal friend Charles Dickens, Louisa May Alcott, Edgar Allan Poe, and John Greenleaf Whittier. He worked at Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper as a young man, and mentored a sixteen-year-old Thomas Nast. Eytinge then worked for the New York Illustrated News and contributed to the journals Every Saturday and Harper's Weekly. Of Dutch Jewish descent, he was born in Amsterdam. See, Diaries of Thomas Butler Gunn, 1849-1863, Vol. 8, page 60, September 16, 1856; Vol. 16, page 17, March 15, 1861. Online Lehigh University's "The Vault at Pfaff's," ptaffs.web.lehigh.edu.]                                  $5,000.00

 

The Great Dartmouth College Case

 

61.   Farrar, Timothy: REPORT OF THE CASE OF THE TRUSTEES OF DARTMOUTH COLLEGE AGAINST WILLIAM H. WOODWARD. ARGUED AND DETERMINED IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF JUDICATURE OF THE STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE, NOVEMBER 1817. AND ON ERROR IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES, FEBRUARY 1819. Portsmouth, N.H.: [1819]. [4], 406pp. Original paper-covered boards, rebacked in period style. Text clean, with some contemporary learned margin annotations. Very Good. 

 

     Farrar's Report-- on one of the most significant and influential cases in our constitutional history-- prints the Charter of 1769 establishing Dartmouth College; the offending 1816 New Hampshire statutes, enacted by a Federalist legislature, abolishing the Charter and turning Dartmouth into a State university; the proceedings in New Hampshire's Superior Court, including the arguments of Mason and others; the opinion and judgment of that Court; the Writ of Error to the United States Supreme Court; the arguments of Webster, Wirt, and others, with the Opinions by Chief Justice Marshall, Justice Story, and Justice Washington; and an Appendix, which includes the minutes of Dartmouth's meeting of Trustees in response to New Hampshire's 1816 Acts, and a Protest against the Act by the minority of the New Hampshire House of Representatives.

     DAB says that this offering "contains the only report of the argument of Jeremiah Mason."

FIRST EDITION. Marvin 303. Sabin 23887. I Harv. Law Cat. 671. VI DAB 293. Cohen 11614.                                                                                                                          $1,500.00

 

62.   Feldman, Rabbi Abraham: BULLETINS FROM THE FREE SYNAGOGUE OF FLUSHING, NEW YORK; THE FREE SYNAGOGUE OF WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, NEW YORK; AND CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL OF ATHENS, GEORGIA, WHERE RABBI FELDMAN OFFICIATED, 1918-1920. 46 Bulletins in an old scrap book. The Bulletins are in Very Good condition, but mounted on brittle, black paper.                 $175.00

 

63.   Florida in the Confederacy: THE ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED AT THE 1ST SESSION OF THE 12TH GENERAL ASSSEMBLY OF FLORIDA, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CAPITOL, IN THE CITY OF TALLAHASSEE, ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1862. Tallahassee: Office of the Floridian & Journal. Printed by Dyke & Carlisle, 1862. 79, [1 blank], IV pp. Bound in institutional cloth, gilt-lettered spine labels, institutional bookplate. A clean and lightly worn text. Very Good.

 

     An early Florida Confederate imprint, with much material on the ongoing War.    

Parrish & Willingham 2734.                                                                                       $375.00

 

64.   Folsom, John W.: THE INDEPENDENT LEDGER AND THE AMERICAN ADVERTISER. JOHN W. FOLSOM'S, ON THE WEST SIDE OF THE MARKET. [Boston]: Monday, March 22, 1784. Folio, 9-1/2" x 14-3/8". Each page printed in three columns. Disbound, light uniform toning, mild foxing. Very Good.

 

     This issue of the paper, begun in 1778 by Folsom and Edward Draper, contains "Verses on the Constitutions of the Several States." "Most human forms of government were made/ For low ambition's more than virtue's aid... But now, behold, a set of new born States."

     News about local crimes and criminals is reported; a variety of advertisements, local political issues, and other news is printed.                                                              $375.00

 

“Dedicated to Restoration of Lasting Good Relations

Between North and South”

 

65.   Forney, J[ohn] W.: TO THE PEOPLE OF THE SOUTH. THE DAILY, SUNDAY AND WEEKLY WASHINGTON CHRONICLE. [Washington: 1866?]. Printed Broadsheet, 7-5/8" x 9-5/8". Old horizontal folds, Very Good.

 

     Forney was a Pennsylvania publisher, a journalist, and a Democrat who broke with his friend James Buchanan over the Kansas-Nebraska issue. Appleton says, "Few men in the country contributed more than Mr. Forney to strengthen the Republican party, and to prepare it for the contest of 1860." He published the Chronicle throughout the War, and was a friend and ally of President Lincoln. Now, the War over, Forney appeals to southerners to subscribe to his newspaper. "One of the habits of the old party leaders was to exclude from the people of the South... all varieties of books and newspapers that ventured to discuss the delicate subject of human servitude, and its manifold incidental relations...It is the duty of all the people of the Republic to address themselves to the new condition of things." He looks forward to "the revival of commerce between the late separated States," and "the rebuilding and equipping of the great lines of travel and transportation."

     The great hope for binding the formerly warring States together is Forney's "public journal established at and speaking from the National Capitol, capable of discussing vital questions with magnanimity and fairness, and dedicated to a practical restoration of lasting good relations between North and South." Forney has "intimate connections with some of the foremost men of the contending parties." He was a conciliator between the sections until the onset of war, a supporter of Stephen Douglas and opponent of Breckinridge. "All matters of interest to the Southern people will be carefully collected, arranged and discussed in these columns."

Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.                                                                   $450.00

 

Four Scarce Works on the Precursor of the Republican Party

 

66.   [Free Soil Party]: TO FREE SOIL MEN OF MAINE WHO DO NOT TAKE THE PORTLAND INQUIRER! [Portland: 1851]. Broadside, 8" x 13". Printed in two columns, "Portland Inquirer- Extra" printed at head of title. Light foxing, light blank margin wear, else a Very Good copy of a rare survival.

 

     "The Portland Inquirer is the last permutation of a series of anti-slavery newspapers in Portland and Maine. It was one of three party politics abolitionist papers: the Liberty Standard and the Free Soil Republican being the other two. It ran from 1851-1855 and then merged with the Maine Temperance Journal to become the Maine Temperance Journal and Inquirer." [web site of the Maine Historical Society]

     The editors of the Inquirer urge all anti-slavery men to support the 'Inquirer'. "We want your assistance in supporting a FREE SOIL PAPER IN MAINE... Without a vigorous free press, no organized action can be had in the State."

Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.                                                                   $450.00

 

67.   [Free Soil Party]: THE UTICA CONVENTION. VOICE OF NEW-YORK!! PROCEEDINGS OF THE UTICA CONVENTION, FEBRUARY 16, 1848, WITH THE SPEECHES OF JOHN VAN BUREN, GEORGE RATHBUN, &C. "FREE TRADE, FREE LABOR, FREE SOIL, FREE SPEECH AND FREE MEN." Albany: Albany Atlas-Extra-, February, 1848. 32pp, stitched, printed in double columns. Caption title [as issued]. Very Good.

 

     This historic Convention, precursor to the Free Soil Party's nomination in June of Martin Van Buren, was chaired by his son John. It was a gathering of New York Democrats who opposed the Deep South's domination of their Party, after the Mexican Cession had brought the question of slavery in the territories to the forefront of national politics. Proclaiming that they will no longer be "the abettors of human slavery," the delegates praise the Wilmot Proviso, which would bar slavery from the new Territories; and they adopt a platform blending Free Soil principles with traditional Democratic stances favoring free trade and opposing monopolies and the national bank.

FIRST EDITION. LCP 3054. Not in Sabin, Dumond, Blockson, Work, Weinstein. OCLC shows a number of institutional locations.                                                             $450.00

 

68.   [Free Soil Party] Gibbs, Richard: CIRCULAR LETTER. HARPERSFIELD, OCT. 20TH, 1856. DEAR SIR: YOU ARE PROBABLY AWARE THAT I AM A CANDIDATE FOR MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY FOR THIS DISTRICT... Harpersfield [NY]: 1856. Broadside, 5" x 8". Very Good.

 

     Gibbs ran on the Free Soil ticket. "I am for FREEDOM and FREE TERRITORY, and opposed to the extension of Slavery; not for invading the constitutional rights of any State, but for keeping Slavery within its proper bounds."

     Gibbs's Circular reflects contemporary American political turmoil. The overriding question is: "Shall Slavery be confined to its present limits, or be suffered to extend over our vast Western Territories?" He regrets "that the old Political parties at the North might be broken up," but "Never was there a greater difference of opinion among us; men of different opinions, upon this great question, often belong to the same political party, and being attached to a party is not a sure indication of their principles."

Not located on OCLC, or the online sites of the New York Public Library, AAS, NY Hist. Soc. as of March 2017.                                                                                                   $375.00

 

69.   [Free Soil Party in Connecticut]: PURSUANT TO PREVIOUS NOTICE, A MEETING OF THE FRIENDS OF FREE SOIL, CONVENED AT THE TOWN HALL, IN SUFFIELD, ON THE 8TH DAY OF JULY, 1848... TO THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT. [Hartford? 1848. Broadside, 8-1/4" x 13-5/8. Light margin wear. 'Released' rubberstamp of Connecticut Historical Society on blank verso. Very Good. The Meeting voted to offer these Proceedings "for publication to the Hartford Courant, the Hartford Times and the Charter Oak." Dated and signed in type at the end, "Samuel N. Reid, Secretary. David Hale, Chairman. Suffield, July 8th, 1848."

 

     This rare and significant broadside records the historic beginnings of the Free Soil Party, the precursor to the Republicans. The end of the Mexican War brought a divisive question to the forefront of American political life: Would the Territories acquired from Mexico be Slave or Free? Many Northern Democrats and Whigs, fearful that the "Slave Power" controlled their parties, experienced "deep and grave dissatisfaction." "Gen. Cass is the supple tool of Slave-holders and Slavery extensionists... Gen. Taylor is also opposed to the restriction of the limits of Slavery,-- and therefore we dare not trust either of them with the interests of Free Labor." The new Party takes the position advocated by Abraham Lincoln a decade later: disclaiming any intention to interfere "with the reserved rights and domestic institutions of any of the States of the Union, we are, at the same time, the determined and uncompromising opponents of the extension of Slavery over any territory now free."

     The Meeting calls for the selection of delegates "to represent this State, in the National Convention at Buffalo, on the 9th day of August, 1848," in order "to form an effective organization for the defence of the principles of Freedom, and to oppose the extension of Slavery." The Buffalo Convention nominated Martin Van Buren and John P. Hale for the presidency and vice presidency.   

OCLC  22947076 [2- CT Hist. Soc., CT State Lib.] as of March 2017. Not located in Work, LCP, Blockson, Dumond.                                                                                             $1,500.00

 

Educating Freed Slaves

 

70.   Freedmen: SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE NEW ENGLAND FREEDMEN'S AID SOCIETY, (EDUCATIONAL COMMISSION.) PRESENTED TO THE SOCIETY, APRIL 21, 1864. Boston: Published at the Office of the Society, 1864. 86pp, stitched in original printed wrappers (minor dusting). Fine.

 

     The second report of this interesting organization, whose educational program for freedmen in Port Royal, South Carolina, and other areas liberated by the North was an unusual, if not unique, wartime experiment. "Left behind by their owners were some ten thousand contrabands who soon became part of an abolitionist experiment in freedmen's education and cotton planting with free labor...Abolitionists organized freedmen's aid societies which sent teachers and labor superintendents to these islands..." [McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom 371, 498]. This document includes a report on the Society's activities during the preceding year. In addition to schooling, its emissaries engaged the freedmen in the basic work-for-pay routines and instruction in agricultural self-sufficiency. A summary of such activities and a list of teachers are included.

     Numerous young women from upper-class Massachusetts families participated in this enterprise.

FIRST EDITION. Sabin 52685. LCP 7051. Not in Work or Blockson.                    $375.00

 

71.   Glover, S[tephen]: GEN. SCOTT'S GRAND MARCH. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co. 277 Washington St. [1861]. 9-1/2" x 13-1/4." [6], [1 blank] pp. J.H. Bufford's Lithograph on title page, a color portrait of a seated Scott, in full military uniform under a canopy of the American flag. Light foxing, Very Good.

 

     Music only, no words, and probably printed in 1861. It was featured in 'Dwight's Journal of Music: A Paper of Art and Literature', August 10, 1861, page 152, as one of Oliver Ditson & Co.'s latest publications, and notes the richly colored, lifelike portrait of Scott. This item was also one of the titles featured in The Ladies' Repository, Vol. XXX, New Series, Vol. II, January 1862, page 340, under the heading "New Music."

Box 82, Item 103, Levy Sheet Music Collection. Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.

                                                                                                                                    $450.00

 

72.   Grayson, William J.: JAMES LOUIS PETIGRU. A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1866. Original cloth, gilt-lettered facsimile signature of Petigru on front cover, gilt-lettered title stamped on spine. Half title, portrait of Petigru [loosened] with original tissue guard. Faint blindstamp. xvii, [2 blanks], [19]-178 pp. Old bookplate on front pastedown, else Very Good.

 

     An elite South Carolinian, Petigru was an excellent lawyer who opposed nullification, secession, and the Confederacy. He held a number of offices in the State. This is the primary source on his life. He died in 1863.

III Turnbull 410.                                                                                                         $125.00

 

“The Only Record” of an Important Hearing in

The Wheeling Bridge Case

 

73.   [Grier, Justice Robert Cooper]: THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA, VS. THE WHEELING AND BELMONT BRIDGE CO., AND OTHERS. [Philadelphia? 1849]. 20pp, caption title. Disbound, else Very Good.

 

     Page [4] is a full-page engineer's diagram showing the elevation of the Wheeling Bridge.      "This printed pamphlet appears to have been printed privately by Justice Grier. In form and content it resembles an official opinion; however, it is not cited by the Court subsequently and is not among the case papers in the National Archives. [It is] the only record of the August 1849 hearing." [Monroe, The Wheeling Bridge Case, page 196, Note 65 (1992)].

     The case came before Supreme Court Justice Grier on the State of Pennsylvania's motion for an injunction prohibiting construction of the bridge from Wheeling across the Ohio River. Pennsylvania claimed that the bridge obstructed the navigable waters of the Ohio, "an ancient navigable public river, and common highway"; that Congress therefore had exclusive control over it; and that Virginia's attempt to authorize a bridge unconstitutionally invaded federal power over interstate commerce and navigable waters. Justice Grier agreed that the proposed Wheeling Bridge would obstruct navigation of the Ohio River. This argument would eventually prevail in an opinion by a divided Supreme Court, nixing the Bridge.

     The case arose from the competition between Pennsylvania and Virginia for domination of the developing trade with western markets. Existing traffic from the West along the Ohio River normally terminated at Pittsburgh, about one hundred miles north of the proposed Wheeling Bridge. Edwin Stanton represented the State of Pennsylvania in this celebrated case; Reverdy Johnson was counsel for the Bridge Company.

OCLC 40652151 [2- NYPL, Easton Pub. Lib.] [as of March 2017]. Not in Cohen, Harv. Law Cat., Marke, Sabin, Eberstadt or Thomson.                                                             $600.00

 

74.   Grigsby, Hugh Blair: THE VIRGINIA CONVENTION OF 1776. A DISCOURSE DELIVERED BEFORE THE VIRGINIA ALPHA OF THE PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY, IN THE CHAPEL OF WILLIAM AND MARY COLLEGE, IN THE CITY OF WILLIAMSBURG, ON THE AFTERNOON OF JULY THE 3RD, 1855. Richmond, VA: J.W. Randolph, 1855. 206, [2 blanks], xv, [1] pp. Original cloth, slightly shaken, Very Good.

 

     The final 16 pages consist of Randolph's bookseller advertisements. The book is an excellent reference for the Convention, which featured such notables as Patrick Henry, James Madison, and Thomas Jefferson.

FIRST EDITION. Haynes 7401. Sabin 28844.                                                          $175.00

 

“One of the Earliest to Reach the Missouri River”

 

75.   Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company: THE HANNIBAL AND ST. JOSEPH RAILROAD COMPANY HAVE RECEIVED BY GRANT FROM CONGRESS OVER 600,000 ACRES OF THE CHOICEST FARMING & WOOD LANDS, THE GREATER PORTION OF WHICH IS NOW IN THE MARKET, AND THE REMAINDER WILL BE OFFERED FROM TIME TO TIME. SALES WILL BE MADE BY AGREEMENT IN LOTS TO SUIT PURCHASERS, ON TEN YEARS TIME AND FIVE PER CENT. INTEREST. THESE LANDS ARE SITUATED ON EACH SIDE, AND WITHIN FIFTEEN MILES OF THE HANNIBAL AND ST. JOSEPH RAILROAD, EXTENDING ENTIRELY ACROSS THE STATE, IN NORTHERN MISSOURI. Hannibal, Mo.: Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Office, 1860 [wrapper date 1859]. 60pp plus double-page frontis map entitled, 'Railway Guide to the Hannibal & St. Joseph Rail Road Lands in Missouri,' engraved on wood by W. Mackwitz, St. Louis; plus 'Map of Northern Missouri Showing the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Lands'; plus six full-page engraved illustrations, including views of Grand Valley and St. Joseph. Original printed yellow wrappers [spine and corner wear, light contemporary ink stamp of 'General Market Office, 21 State St. Boston' on front wrapper], stitched. The rear wrapper describes the routes, connections, and transit times of the Railroad. Very Good plus.

 

     The Road was one of the earliest to reach the Missouri River, in northwestern Missouri, at St. Joseph, the starting point of the Pony Express. [Taylor, The Transportation Revolution, page 86]. It traversed Northern Missouri, connecting Chicago and St. Louis with Kansas and Nebraska.

     The pamphlet describes the route; lands offered for sale; connecting roads; prices and terms of payment; the advantages of the "rolling and healthy", "well-watered," "well- wooded" properties. The location of the Road and lands is "unequaled by any other portion of the country." Agriculture and stock raising are the best in the Nation. Similarly advantaged are markets-- with cheap freight rates-- and cultural and educational opportunities. St. Louis, St. Joseph, and Hannibal are described. The State Geologist and other experts weigh in with testimonials.

Bureau of Railway Economics 211. Not in Sabin, Eberstadt, Graff, Decker, Soliday. A number of institutional locations on OCLC.                                                                            $750.00

 

No Gold or Silver Lace Allowed!

 

76.   Harvard College: EXTRACTS FROM THE LAWS OF HARVARD COLLEGE, FOR THE INFORMATION OF THE PARENTS AND GUARDIANS OF STUDENTS. [np: @1820]. Broadside, 8-3/4" x 11". Printed in two columns. Lightly toned, mild spotting, untrimmed. Very Good.

 

     A rare Harvard College broadside. Among the requirements: parents or guardians must give a $400 surety bond securing payment of tuition; each student must promise to obey the Laws of the College. "All the Undergraduates shall be clothed in coats of blue grey, or of black, and shall not appear in a coat of any other colour, unless he shall have on a night gown, or, in stormy or cold weather, an outside garment over his coat." Moreover, students "shall not wear gold or silver lace..."   

Not in American Imprints or Sabin. OCLC 79722222 [1- Huntington], 81393895 [1- AAS], 6525122 [1- MA Hist. Soc.] as of March 2017.                                                 $650.00

 

An Able Defense of Trial by Jury

 

77.   Hawles, Sir John: THE ENGLISHMAN'S RIGHT, OR, A DIALOGUE BETWEEN A BARRISTER AT LAW AND A JURYMAN; SHEWING, 1. THE ANTIQUITY. 2. THE EXCELLENT DESIGNED USE. 3. THE OFFICE AND JUST PRIVILEGES OF JURIES BY THE LAW OF ENGLAND. (BEING A CHOICE HELP FOR ALL WHO ARE QUALIFIED BY LAW, TO SERVE ON JURIES). BY SIR JOHN HAWLES, KNT. SOLICITOR GENERAL TO THE LATE KING WILLIAM. TO WHICH IS PREFIXED, AN INTRODUCTORY ESSAY, ON THE MORAL DUTY OF A JUDGE. BY LORD BACON. Philadelphia: Printed by John Thompson, of Philadelphia; for Alexander Brodie, 1798. viii, [17]-70 pp [as issued]. Contemporary quarter calf and marbled paper boards [front board darkened at upper forecorner; lower portion of spine chipped]. The second of two front free endpapers has a blank corner tear. Very Good, with the 1809 ownership signature of Wm. Barret.

 

     The Publisher Note explains that he published this tract "to preserve Trial by Jury inviolate." It merits the particular "attention of Citizen and Alien," doubtless because he believed the recent enactment of the Alien & Sedition Laws threatened that ancient right. First published in London in 1680, it was reprinted in Boston in 1772. This second American edition endorses the primacy of the right of jury trial in American jurisprudence.

     To avoid any implication of Anglophilia, Brodie writes, "But lest the title 'The Englishman's Right' should give offence to any, it is proper to observe that the Charter of the Liberties of England is a grant from their kings obtained by force. This charter is the fountain of all their Rights; and among others of the Englishman's Right to be tried by a Jury of his Equals. As Americans we possess the same Right... But we claim no right by conquest or descent from the people of England. We hold our Liberties from God alone."

Evans 33862. Cohen 1481. Marvin 376 [London: 1770]. Marke 187 [London: 1680].

                                                                                                                                    $1,000.00

 

Auctioneers vs. Retailers

 

78.   Hoffman, Martin; Hone, Philip; Dunham, David: AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY A COMMITTEE REPRESENTING NEW YORK CITY AUCTIONEERS, 19 DECEMBER 1817, TO T.K. JONES & CO., A PROMINENT BOSTON AUCTION FIRM, SEEKING ITS AID IN LOBBYING AGAINST LEGISLATION TAXING AUCTION SALES:

   "THE ABROGATION OF THE LAW TOUCHING INTERNAL TAXES & WITH IT THE DUTY OF TWO PER CENT ON SALES BY AUCTION MUST BE A SUBJECT OF CONGRATULATION TO EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN AUCTION SALES. BUT SERIOUS APPREHENSION IS ENTERTAINED OF A NEW BILL ORIGINATING WITH THE SAME COMMITTEE THAT RECOMMENDED ITS REPEAL. THE DUTY IT IS SAID IS TO BE COLLECTED THROUGH THE MEDIUM OF THE CUSTOM HOUSE & FROM THAT DEPARTMENT THE AUCTIONEERS ARE TO DERIVE THEIR AUTHORITY… IN TRUTH WE ARE INFORMED THAT THIS THING HAS BEEN IN AGITATION FOR MANY MONTHS & DIRECTED FROM ONE EXTREME PART OF THE UNION TO THE OTHER & THAT MUCH INDUSTRY HAS BEEN USED TO INTEREST EVERY MEMBER OF CONGRESS ON WHOM THEY COULD MAKE ANY IMPRESSION. OUR OBJECT THEREFORE IS TO MAKE YOU ACQUAINTED WITH THESE FACTS & TO INVITE YOUR COOPERATION WITH US. WE INTEND TO WRITE TO THE COMMITTEE OF WAYS & MEANS, INDIVIDUALLY OUR OBJECTIONS TO ANY DUTY WHATEVER ON SALES AT AUCTION AND DENY THAT ANY FACILITIES ARE AFFORDED BY AUCTION SALES TO DEFRAUD THE REVENUE &C AS HAS BEEN SO ERRONEOUSLY ASSERTED..." Folio leaf folded to 7- 1/4" x 9". [2], [1 blank], [1-address] pp. Light tanning, old folds, small tear at main fold from opening wax seal [most letters of the word 'Baltimore' are lost], small 2" x 3" rectangle cut from blank leaf [no text loss]. Addressed on final page with red date stamp "NEW YORK DEC 19." Signed in ink by Martin Hoffman, Philip Hone and David Dunham. Good+ to Very Good.

 

          Three men representing four New York City auction houses write to Boston auctioneer T.K. Jones & Co., seeking its aid in avoiding duties on auction sales. The signers-- Martin Hoffman, Philip Hone, and David Dunham-- are a "Committee of Correspondence" in contact with "our Brethren" in Providence, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. Auction houses and established retail merchants were competitors. Merchants resented auctioneers' disruption of their retail markets; auctioneers argued that they contributed to market efficiency. Retailers lobbied for government to tax auctioneers to diminish the latter's competitive advantages.

       Philip Hone (1780-1851), later Mayor of New York, was a partner in one of the most successful auction firms in New York City. In 1795 Martin Hoffman founded the auction house of Hoffman & Seaton. David Dunham was a partner of Matthew Davis in the auction firm Dunham & Davis. Davis was the friend and biographer of Aaron Burr. [Barrett, The Old Merchants of New York City. Second Series. New York, 1863.] Thomas Kilby Jones [c.1758-1841], founder of T.K. Jones & Co., was a leading Boston auctioneer.            $275.00

 

79.   Hogan, J. Sheridan: CANADA. AN ESSAY: TO WHICH WAS AWARDED THE FIRST PRIZE BY THE PARIS EXHIBITION COMMITTEE OF CANADA. Montreal: John Lovell, 1855. Original printed wrappers [plain rear wrapper present but detached], stitched. 110, [2 blanks] pp. Wrappers dusted, else a clean and Very Good text.

 

     The essay was also printed in French in 1855. History, geography, natural resources, population, agriculture, manufactures, banking, railroads, infrastructure are discussed.

TPL 3558.                                                                                                                   $150.00

 

“Evidence Relative to the Conduct of the

Trial of the Assassins”

 

80.   Holt, Joseph: VINDICATION OF JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL HOLT, FROM THE FOUL SLANDERS OF TRAITORS, THEIR AIDERS, ABETTORS, AND SYMPATHIZERS, ACTING IN THE INTEREST OF JEFFERSON DAVIS. SECOND EDITION, COMPRISING THE DEPOSITIONS OF JOSEPH A. HOARE AND WILLIAM ROBERTS, AND THE LETTERS OF HON. JAMES F. WILSON...AND OF BVT. COL. TURNER, AND OF HON. E.M. STANTON, SECRETARY OF WAR. [Washington: 1866]. 15pp, stitched. Blank bottom margin with a persistent short chip. Very Good.

 

     "Expanded edition of evidence relative to the conduct of the trial of the assassins" [Monaghan]. The investigation by Joseph Holt, the Army's Judge Advocate General, concluded that Jefferson Davis was a key conspirator in the plot to kill Lincoln. Holt does not lack some basis for this claim.

     But one of Davis's accusers, Sanford Conover, has proven to be a perjurer. Holt says here that the evidence against Davis does not depend upon Conover; that contrary assertions are "malignantly slanderous". He cites evidence "that a conspiracy has been formed to defame the Judge Advocate General and the Bureau of Military Justice, "thereby giving "support to the movement now so vigorously pressed for the release of Davis." This second and best edition includes new material from page 8 on, reflecting on the probity of Holt, the integrity of his investigation [particularly with respect to Mrs. Surratt], and the treachery of Conover.

Monaghan 858. Not in LCP, Bartlett, Harv. Law Cat., Eberstadt.                            $275.00

 

Baltimore Democrats Defend Andrew Jackson, “The Saviour of the Union”

 

81.   [Jackson, Andrew]: A BRIEF REFUTATION OF THE SLANDERS PUBLISHED IN THE COFFIN HANDBILL AND MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. Baltimore: Lucas & Deaver, 1828. 15, [1 blank] pp. Stitched, untrimmed. Light scattered foxing, else Very Good.

 

     The authors, who sign in type at the end, are outraged at the Adams Administration's "foulest calumnies against the Saviour of the Union." Their pamphlet is a detailed rebuttal of the charge that Jackson committed "butchery" against the six militia men whose execution he ordered. Statements and reviews of judicial inquiries, all canvassed here, absolve Jackson of any impropriety. The Refutation is signed by the Jackson Committee of Correspondence for the City of Baltimore: the renowned lawyer Reverdy Johnson, future Supreme Court Reporter of Decisions Benjamin Howard, John P. Kennedy, Charles C. Harper, and seven others.        

Wise & Cronin 226. AI 32929 [2]. Not in Miles. OCLC 27282286 [2- Lib. Cong., Johns Hopkins] as of April 2017. The copy at Johns Hopkins has a later-inserted portrait which is not part of the proper collation.                                                                                         $600.00

 

Jackson’s “Vindictiveness,” “Barbarity,”

“Assassin Like Conduct”

 

82.   [Jackson, Andrew]: A HISTORY OF THE LIFE AND PUBLIC SERVICES OF MAJOR GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON. IMPARTIALLY COMPILED FROM THE MOST AUTHENTIC SOURCES. [np]: 1828. 32pp. Disbound, light scattered foxing. Good+.

 

     This is one of several variant printings, all anonymous. The author may have concluded that revealing his identity would be unwise: he portrays Jackson as a violent, reckless, impulsive, and dangerous man.

     The pamphlet recounts the duel with Dickinson, "with circumstances of peculiar vindictiveness"; the street fight with Thomas Hart Benton, revealing Jackson's "assassin like character"; the Florida campaign, in which Jackson's atrocities "sullied the American military character, and particularly his own, by the barbarity of his massacre, in cold blood, of unresisting fugitives." His tyrannical conduct at New Orleans and elsewhere, with particular attention to his treatment of Louallier, is deplored. Jackson has no redeeming qualities.

Miles 22 [variant]. Wise & Cronin 305 [variant]. AI 33564 [1]. OCLC records nine locations of this imprint under two accession numbers, as of February 2017.                          $375.00

 

By “The Cruikshank of the New World”

 

83.   [Johnston, David Claypoole]: "A BEAUTIFUL GOBLET OF WHITE HOUSE CHAMPAGNE" / "AN UGLY MUG OF LOG CABIN CIDER." METAMORPHIC CARD FROM THE 1840 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN DEPICTING LOSING CANDIDATE MARTIN VAN BUREN. [Boston: 1840]. Stipple engraving and etching of Martin Van Buren, hand-colored. His initials, facial expression, etc. change when the tab is pulled. Above the first caption is a smiling Van Buren, holding a gold goblet initialed 'M.V.B.'. Above the second caption a grim, disappointed Van Buren holds the goblet but with initials 'W.H.H.' Light foxing, Very Good.

 

     Johnston was "known to his many admirers as the Cruikshank of the New World" [Greenhill, 'David Claypoole Johnston and the Menial Labor of Caricature', in 17 American Art, No. 3, pp 32-51 (2003)]. He was "the first American comic artist to have a sustained and popular career... From about 1825 to 1850, D.C. Johnston was the outstanding comic artist of New England in painting and in the graphic arts. He was the first natively trained American to master with distinction all the various graphic arts processes of lithography, etching, metal plate engraving, and wood engraving" [Tatham, 'A Note About David Claypoole Johnston,' in Syracuse Library Associates Courier, Spring 1970].

OCLC records four locations under three accession numbers, as of February 2017.

                                                                                                                                    $350.00

 

84.   Johnston, William: ARGUMENT...IN THE CASE OF STATE VS. AMES, BEFORE THE CRIMINAL COURT OF CINCINNATI. Cincinnati: [Marshall & Langtry, Printers]. 1853. Original printed front wrapper [dirty], stitched, 40pp. Title page and last page dusted, some blank foremargin wear to title leaf. Good+.

 

     Johnston was a skilled Ohio lawyer whose other clients had included alleged fugitive slaves. Here his client is Fisher W. Ames, charged with attempted murder. Johnston's preface to this pamphlet complains of media bias. The press, he says, published "a stupid caricature" of his argument. Newspapers suspected that he "had been in part instrumental in snatching from them a victim, whom they had pursued with unparalled [sic] ferocity," and thus "turned from the baffled pursuit to make war on a humble advocate, and to make ridicule of his feeble efforts." He complains that press bias makes it "impossible" to find an unbiased jury, encourages perjury, and pollutes popular opinion. He prints his jury argument in full.

Sabin 36388. Cohen 13773. Not in McCoy, Harv. Law Cat., Marke, Thomson, Eberstadt, Decker.                                                                                                                       $350.00

 

85.   [Jones, Benjamin]: A CRY FROM THE NORTH, BEING A SERIES OF LETTERS FROM A GENTLEMAN IN BOSTON, TO HIS BROTHER IN THE SOUTH, ON ORTHODOX POLICY, &C. Boston: Benjamin Jones, 1827. [4], 74 pp. Widely scattered foxing, minor wear, else Very Good. Contemporary plain boards and cloth-tape spine [light dust and rubbing].

 

     A series of thirteen consecutive weekly numbers, ending November 5, 1827. It is the complete series, as issued. The Preface, dated November 7, 1827, explains that the decision to publish them "has been actuated by a sincere desire, to promote the cause of religious freedom and evangelical piety." He decided "to conceal his name" because he "has no wish to excite the anger of his brethren toward him, but rather to provoke them to love and good works."

     The author denounces established churches for hypocrisy and obeisance to wealth. He promises, "I shall do what lies in my power to put down priestcraft, and to expose wickedness in high places." Each of the first five letters prints, at the end, "[Second Edition.],” indicating that they were reprinted for this first collected edition.

Sabin 17741. Not in Mott, American Imprints, or Lomazow. OCLC 15363563 [3- SMU Bridwell, U IL, Mid-American Baptist Seminary] as of March 2017.                    $375.00

 

“Never Suffer an Invasion of YOUR Political Constitution”

 

86.   Junius [pseud.]: THE LETTERS OF JUNIUS, COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME, WITH A COPIOUS INDEX. Philadelphia: Robert Campbell, 1795. 12mo. [4], xii, 13-283, [13] pp. Original calf, gilt spine rules, gilt-lettered spine title on black morocco. Occasional, widely scattered foxing, Very Good. Early ownership signature on front free endpaper, 'Ephraim Hinds.'

 

     The preface, a 'Dedication to the English Nation,' exhorts readers "never to suffer an invasion of YOUR political constitution, however minute the instance may appear, to pass by, without a determined, persevering resistance. One precedent creates another.- They soon accumulate and constitute law."

SECOND AMERICAN EDITION. Evans 28912.                                                     $350.00

 

87.   Juvenile: THE YOUNG CHILD'S A, B, C; OR, FIRST BOOK. New-York: Published by Samuel Wood & Sons, No. 261, Pearl-Street; and Samuel S. Wood & Co. No. 212, Market-st. Baltimore. [1816?]. 16mo. 16pp plus original printed tan wrappers, with front wrapper vignette of old man followed by a dog, and rear wrapper vignette of an animal [fox?] looking at an animal's head in a weird, rustic scene. Title page woodcut of a maiden holding a bird and petting a dog. 26 additional, excellently executed woodcuts in text. Light dusting to wraps, Very Good.

 

     This is probably the 1816 printing, one of several imprints from 1806-1820, differing primarily in the wrapper woodcuts and the description of the publisher. This one is not noted in the various editions cited by Welch.

See Welch 1461.1-1461; and OCLC 8695781.                                                          $350.00

 

88.   Kirby, Ephraim: REPORTS OF CASES ADJUDGED IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT. FROM THE YEAR 1785, TO MAY 1788; WITH SOME DETERMINATIONS IN THE SUPREME COURT OF ERRORS. Litchfield: Collier & Adam, 1789. v, [3], 456, [29], [3 blanks] pp. Bound in original sheep [spinehead with a bit of chipping] gilt-lettered red morocco spine label. Light to moderate foxing, else Very Good. With the decorative bookplate of Lemuel Ingalls of Pomfret [CT]. 

 

     "The first volume of reports of judicial decisions in the courts of this country printed." [Evans.] "Kirby made a permanent place for his name in the annals of American law by publishing, in Litchfield, his Reports...It was the first fully developed volume of law reports published in the United States and in American legal literature holds a place comparable to that which Plowden's Commentaries holds in English literature. In a remarkable preface, Kirby demonstrated that a system of law reporting was essential to the development of American law" [DAB.] An alphabetical digest of the cases is included, with a five-page list of subscribers, including Connecticut's-- and some of New York's-- legal, literary, and political elite: Baldwins, Daggetts, Griswolds, Joel Barlow, Huntingtons, Tapping Reeve, Ezra Stiles, James Kent. 

     Lemuel Ingalls [1755-1839], born in Pomfret, Connecticut, was a revolutionary soldier who served for nine days in the 1775 Lexington Alarm. He graduated from Yale, studied law and practiced in Pomfret. He was Judge of Probate, County Surveyor, and served in the State Legislature. 

FIRST EDITION. Evans 21914. Marvin p.442. I Harv. Law Cat. p.1100.               $350.00

 

“Wonderful Subterranean Caves”

 

89.   [Knoepfel, W.H.]: AN ACCOUNT OF KNOEPFEL'S SCHOHARIE CAVE, SCHOHARIE COUNTY, NEW-YORK: WITH THE HISTORY OF ITS DISCOVERY, SUBTERRANEAN LAKE, MINERALS, AND NATURAL CURIOSITIES. ILLUSTRATED WITH ENGRAVINGS. New York: W.E. & J. Sibell, 1853. Original printed wrappers [detached, extremity chipping]. 16pp. Margin-spotted. Good+, with two folding sketches in very good condition: 'Side View of the Subterranean Cave and Lake at Schoharie, N.Y.'; and 'Ground View of Knoepfel's Cave.'

 

     The author loves America's "wonderful subterranean caves," especially his own. They are "rarely to be found elsewhere."

FIRST EDITION. Sabin 38136.                                                                                 $275.00

 

New England Men Say Wage Labor is

“Worse than Things at the South”

 

90.   Labor Reform League: THE CONDITION OF LABOR. AN ADDRESS TO THE MEMBERS OF THE LABOR REFORM LEAGUE OF NEW ENGLAND; IN A SPEECH IN SUPPORT OF SOME RESOLUTIONS OFFERED AT THEIR LATE CONVENTION IN BOSTON. BY ONE OF THE MEMBERS. Boston: Published by the Author, 1847. Original printed wrappers, stitched, 32pp. Wrappers chipped, repair to front wrap [no text loss], else Very Good.

 

     An early, scarce, and unusual radical critique of American capitalism. Apologists for Negro slavery would echo this New England condemnation of the free labor system. The author says American wage labor is "worse than things at the South."

     The League attributes "the evils which oppress and burden the men and women of New England" to "a vicious social organization." America is "but one remove from...the Feudal state... [L]abor and capital are in direct antagonism. Or rather that labor is passive, while capital wages a ceaseless war, a guerilla war at least, upon it, cutting off its resources whenever it is possible. Instead of standing upon an equal footing with capital and being able to treat with it upon an equal basis, it stands in the market-place like a slave." The author and the League urge the "Organization of Labor, and the Association of Laborers, whereby they shall work for themselves, and not for another, and receive the Profits of their own Labor." 

Sabin 15187. Goldsmiths'-Kress Library of Economic Literature 35408.16. OCLC locates eight copies under three accession numbers as of February 2017.                                   $600.00

 

Premature Congratulations

 

91.   Lamar, John B. et al.: ADDRESS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL UNION PARTY OF GEORGIA [and] ADDRESS OF A PORTION OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE TO THE UNION DEMOCRACY AND UNION WHIGS, FRIENDS OF PIERCE AND KING. [Milledgeville? August 10, 1852]. [4] pp, printed on rectos only. Folio sheet, folded to 8-1/4" x 10-1/4". Old folds, Very Good plus. Printed on blue paper, and signed at the end in type.

 

     The Constitutional Union Party announces "the complete triumph of their principles... in favor of the finality of the Compromise" of 1850. Lamar and his fellow Executive Committee members conclude that the Party should now dissolve, in order "to secure the vote of Georgia to Pierce and King," the Democratic presidential ticket.

     Because the Whig Party is reorganizing in Georgia, the Executive Committee urges solidarity with "those Union Whigs who stand identified with us in the support of the National Democratic Nominees." The Committee consisted of Lamar, B.H. Hill, Arthur Hood, Noel B. Knight, E.H. Pottle, John W. Owens, and George W. Thomas. Hill and Thomas did not sign the second Address.

FIRST EDITION. De Renne 545. OCLC 5105225 [4- Emory, Duke, U GA, GA Hist. Soc.] as of March 2017. Not in Hummel.                                                                                  $750.00

 

“Must I Shoot a Simple-Minded Boy Who Deserts…?”

 

92.   [Lincoln, Abraham]: PRESIDENT LINCOLN'S VIEWS. AN IMPORTANT LETTER ON THE PRINCIPLES INVOLVED IN THE VALLANDIGHAM CASE. CORRESPONDENCE IN RELATION TO THE DEMOCRATIC MEETING, AT ALBANY, N.Y. Philadelphia: King & Baird. 1863. Original printed wrappers [torn at blank upper right corner of front wrap]. Wrapper title reads: 'The Truth From an Honest Man. The Letter of the President.' 16pp, Very Good.

 

     Lincoln issues his famous reply to the Albany Democrats' resolutions charging him with violating civil liberties by making arbitrary arrests and suppressing free speech. Democrats deplore the arrest and planned deportation of the Ohio Copperhead Vallandigham, who had condemned the War as one "for the freedom of the blacks and the enslavement of the whites." Lincoln responds: "Must I shoot a simple-minded boy who deserts, while I must not touch a hair of the wily agitator who induces him to desert?... I think that in such a case, to silence the agitator and save the boy is not only constitutional but withal a great mercy."

Monaghan 242. Bartlett 2709.                                                                                    $375.00

 

93.   [Louisiana Confederate Imprint]: ACTS PASSED BY THE TWENTY-SEVENTH LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA, IN EXTRA SESSION AT OPELOUSAS, DECEMBER, 1862 & JANUARY, 1863. Natchitoches, LA: Printed at the "Times" Office- Louis Dupleix, Proprietor, 1864. 48pp, printed in English only [as issued]. Disbound, old institutional rubberstamp on blank portion of title page. Else Very Good.,

 

     A scarce Confederate imprint. The Times Office also issued the Acts in a more common version, with English and French on opposite pages.

Parrish & Willingham 2992 [1- LNHC only]. For the English-French printing see P&W 2991 [11 locations].                                                                                                                        $500.00

 

“First to Ascribe This War to a Slave-Holding Conspiracy”

 

94.   [Lundy, Benjamin]: THE ORIGIN AND TRUE CAUSES OF THE TEXAS INSURRECTION, COMMENCED IN THE YEAR 1835. [Philadelphia: 1836]. 32pp. Caption title, as issued.  Stitched, lightly foxed, Good+.

 

     Lundy was, according to Howes, the "first to ascribe this war to a slave-holding conspiracy." Lundy’s critique is "of vital importance to the cause of Liberty and Human Rights." Beginning with the Anglo-American colonization of Texas in 1820, he describes the ensuing corruption: "The swindling operations in the Yazoo land speculations were mere child's play in comparison." Emigrants from the United States to Texas routinely evaded the laws "forbidding the introduction of slaves."

     "First edition in book form of eight articles written by Lundy, under the pseudonym of  'Columbus' for the National Gazette early in 1836. Lundy gives a careful analysis of the Declaration of Independence recently issued by the Texas colonists" [Eberstadt]. Lundy visited Texas several times, attempting to establish a Mexican colony for free slaves.

Howes L569 'aa'. Streeter, Texas 1216. 165 Eberstadt 502. Rader 2265.                  $1,000.00

 

“Massachusetts and Connecticut are Responsible for…

That Savage and Brutal Traffic in Human Flesh”

 

95.   Madison, The Spirit of: THE SPIRIT OF MADISON. TO THAD. STEVENS & CO., GREETING. ALSO, THE PRESIDENT'S VETO MESSAGE OF THE MILITARY BILL. Washington: 1867. Original printed title wrappers [as issued]. Stitched, 48pp. Wrappers moderately edge-worn, spine wear. Contemporary marginalia. Good+. Signed in type at page 39, 'The Spirit of Madison.'

 

     This rare pamphlet expresses the bitterness and anger of a supporter of President Johnson and opponent of Congressional Reconstruction. "Massachusetts and Connecticut are responsible for all the evil which has resulted from that savage and brutal traffic in human flesh, which their liberty-loving demagogues and fanatics now hypocritically assume is the cause of all the misery which has since afflicted and divided our happy, united and prosperous country; and that that odious section which legalized the African slave trade for twenty years would never have defaced and disgraced our Constitution but for the influence and vote of New England." These "New England philanthropists...impiously assumed that they were the chosen and commissioned agents of the Deity to extirpate and abolish the curse from the land."

     The effort to drive Andrew Johnson from the Presidency is "wickedness and villainy."

Sabin 89480. OCLC 32751863 [4- NYHS, W. Res. Hist. Soc., Duke, VA Hist. Soc.], as of February 2017. Not in LCP.                                                                                         $500.00

 

 

 

And the “Champion” is… James Watson Webb!

 

96.   [Magee, John L.]: THE CHAMPION OF DESPOTISM. [New York: 1851 or 1852]. Uncolored lithograph broadside, drawn by Magee. 8-1/2" x 10-3/4". Near Fine.

 

     "A satire critical of New York Courier & Enquirer editor James Watson Webb for his journalistic assaults on exiled Hungarian revolutionary leader Louis Kossuth. Weitenkampf dates the cartoon 1852, but it may have appeared as early as December 1851, when Kossuth landed in New York for a much-publicized visit to seek American diplomatic and financial support for Hungary" [Reilly]. Although most Americans sympathized with Kossuth's struggle for liberty, Webb did not approve of Kossuth's "attempts to embroil the United States in the European conflict" [id.].

     As a top-hatted Kossuth strides down the street, a copy of Webb's newspaper [with headline 'Kossuth'] protruding from his back pocket, people remark unfavorably "on the man what wrote all that Stuf agin the Hungarians." Magee, the artist and lithographer, worked in New York City during this period, with an office at 34 Mott Street, where he produced this scarce lithograph.

Reilly 52-2. Weitenkampf page 112. OCLC 299946275 [2- AAS, Lib. Cong.] as of February 2017.                                                                                                                                  $600.00

 

97.   [Mahone, William]: REPLY TO A COMMUNICATION PUBLISHED BY GEN. C.M. WILCOX, IN THE NEW ORLEANS TIMES, OF JANUARY 1ST, 1872. [np: 1872]. 26pp. Stitched, original printed title wrappers [front wrap detached but present]. Light wear to blank extremities, light spotting, Good+.

 

     General Mahone was extremely thin-skinned when it came to criticism-- real or perceived-- of his war record, particularly because after the War he parlayed his military exploits to become a political powerhouse in Virginia. He became leader of the Virginia 'Readjusters'-- more or less populists who favored a reduction in state indebtedness-- in their battles against 'Stalwarts.' Many Virginians called him a demagogue who had built his success on support from newly-enfranchised Negro voters.

     Here Mahone dissents from a publication by Confederate General Cadmus Marcellus Wilcox concerning Mahone's conduct at the Battle of the Crater. Mahone had previously been hailed as a hero in that engagement. Mahone assembles the "unvarnished statement" of a respected member of General Lee's staff and other reports, all praising Mahone's decisions and conduct.

OCLC 26644539 [1- U VA] as of February 2017. Not in Haynes, Nevins, Sabin.   $350.00

 

Maine Democrats Accuse Anti-Slavery Men of Seeking

“To Batten and Prey Upon the Very Life of the Democratic Party”

 

98.   [Maine]: TO THE DEMOCRATS OF AROOSTOOK COUNTY. [np]: July 31, 1854. Broadside, 12" x 17". Some old folds, several fox spots, couple of short closed margin tears [no loss]. Good+. Signed in type at the end by about 140 loyal Aroostook Democrats.

     The Kansas-Nebraska Act opened the Mexican Cession to Slavery, thus repealing the 1820 Missouri Compromise. Deep divisions among Democrats resulted. Many Northern Democrats resisted the call of their dominant Southern brethren to populate the newly acquired Territories with slaves. Maine's Hannibal Hamlin, for example, left the Party over the Slavery issue and became a Republican [and Lincoln's running mate in 1860].  

     This broadside excoriates such apostates, who have joined forces with anti-slavery men "to batten and prey upon the very life of the Democratic Party," and who are "pledged to opposition to the regular democracy." The broadside accuses them of opposing the Party's "very EXISTENCE, plotting her ENTIRE OVERTHROW and DESTRUCTION."

Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.                                                                   $750.00

 

Chief Justice Marshall’s Landmark Decision Lays the Foundation for an

American National Market

 

99.   [Marshall, Chief Justice John]: FIRST PRINTING OF THE LANDMARK OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES ON THE STEAMBOAT CASE, DELIVERED BY CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN MARSHALL. [Contained in:] NATIONAL INTELLIGENCER, MARCH 6, 1824. Washington: Saturday, March 6, 1824. Folio folded newspaper, five columns per page, some separation at vertical fold. Minor wear, light foxing, else Very Good.

 

    The probable first printing of John Marshall's landmark, unanimous opinion in the case of Gibbons vs. Ogden, one of America's cornerstone constitutional cases. Marshall's opinion was officially dated March 2. The Intelligencer prints it in full, on the fourth column of the front page and 4-1/2 columns on page 4. This daily was the site of many first appearances of early Supreme Court opinions. We have located no earlier printing of the full opinion.

     New York State had granted Ogden a monopoly for steamboat service from New York to New Jersey; but the federal government had also granted Gibbons a coasting license for steamboat service from Elizabeth, New Jersey, to New York City. Ogden sued, arguing that his State-granted monopoly voided the federal coasting license. Gibbons, represented by William Wirt and Daniel Webster, claimed that the Constitution vested in Congress the power to regulate interstate commerce, and that this power voided New York's monopoly grant.

     Chief Justice Marshall established for the first time the breadth of the Commerce Clause, Congress's plenary power over interstate commerce, and the unconstitutionality of state laws that interfered with Congressional regulation. Gibbons vs. Ogden thus inaugurated the vast federal oversight of the American economy for the next two centuries. Marshall's first task was relatively uncomplicated: to demonstrate that navigation of inland waterways was encompassed by the Commerce Clause. Taking note of the enormous amount of interstate commerce occurring by water, Marshall issued his influential canon of Constitutional construction: "The enlightened patriots who framed our Constitution, and the people who adopted it, must be understood to have employed words in their natural sense, and to have intended what they said. If...there should be serious doubts respecting the extent of any given power, it is a well settled rule, that the objects for which it was given, especially when those objects are expressed in the instrument itself, should have great influence in the construction."

     Marshall then rejected the claim that the doctrine of State Sovereignty validated New York's monopoly grant. "The sole question is, can a state regulate commerce with foreign nations and among the states, while Congress is regulating it?" He answers the question in the negative, with profound implications for the development of an American national market. The Constitution and the laws made pursuant to it are the supreme law of the land. Any state laws interfering with the exercise of that power are a "nullity."                                                $1,000.00

 

The Entire Volume Devoted to the “Caroline Affair”

 

100.   [McLeod, Alexander]: GOULD'S STENOGRAPHIC REPORTER; PUBLISHED MONTHLY, IN THE CITY OF WASHINGTON, AND DEVOTED TO THE RECORDING OF IMPORTANT TRIALS, FOR TREASON, MURDER, HIGHWAY ROBBERY, MAIL ROBBERY, CONSPIRACY, RIOT, ARSON, BURGLARY, SEDUCTION, ETC. ALSO MISCELLANEOUS SPEECHES OF AMERICAN STATESMEN, IN CONGRESS AND STATE LEGISLATURES… VOL. II. 1841. Washington: Gould, Banks & Co., New York, and William A. Gould & Co. Albany. 416pp, partly untrimmed. Bound in quarter leather [scuffed] with marbled boards, gilt spine title and raised spine bands. Title page dusted and reattached to binding with paper tape on verso. Some dusting of early leaves, institutional rubberstamps on verso of title page and in blank area of final leaf. The entire volume-- comprising Nos. 1-6 of Volume II-- is devoted to the McLeod Trial. Good+.

 

     In 1837, the British attacked the American steamer Caroline, which had covertly aided the rebels in Canada; an American, Amos Durfee, was killed during the British operation. Northern New York was aflame with anger. Alexander McLeod, a soldier for England, had participated in the attack. "When that erratic individual boasted over his cups in a Buffalo tavern that he was one of the band that sent the steamboat Caroline over Niagara Falls he did not expect to be taken at his word and to be at once locked up in the county jail on a charge of murder" [Marke 995]. Judge Cowen's decision to hold McLeod for trial "was in such direct conflict with well-settled principles of International law as to shock both the judiciary and the bar of this country" [Id.] A jury, more sensible than the trial judge, acquitted him.

     This is the most complete record of the trial, a day-by-day account, with opening and closing statements, testimony of witnesses, the Judge's charge to the jury, depositions, and arguments of law.

Howes M157aa. AI 41-3252 [5]. McDade 661. Cohen 12860.                                 $450.00

 

101.   [Meigs, Josiah]: THE NEW-HAVEN GAZETTE, AND THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE. (VOL. II.) THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, [1787]. NO. 27. New Haven: Josiah Meigs, 1787. 4to. 8pp [(209)-216, as issued]. Disbound. Lightly foxed, Very Good.

 

     An interesting issue of this newspaper, printing an "Extract of a letter from his Excellency Governor Jefferson, Minister Plenipotentiary at Paris... to the Reverend President Stiles, dated Paris, September 1, 1786;" questionable practices of tax collectors; a letter from 'A Countryman' on the insufficiency of funds to run the State government; a cure for The Flux; a detailed description of "the late hurricane at Wethersfield"; and a page and a half of advertisements.

     Jefferson's letter speculates on the origins of the American Indians and notes their "similitude" with "those of the eastern parts of Asia." He also discusses an improvement in the telescope and "a new method of copying" on copper plate.                                           $275.00

 

 

“We Must Not Make War for the Rights of Other Nations”—

Not Even for Spain’s Oppressed Colonies

 

102.   Mentor [pseud.]: THE TRUE POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES, RESPECTING THE SPANISH COLONIES; AND ANOTHER IMPORTANT SUBJECT. ADDRESSED IN FOUR LETTERS, FROM A CITIZEN OF WASHINGTON, TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES. Washington: Jonathan Elliot, 1818. 14, [2 blanks] pp. Stitched, some loosening; light wear, some margin dust. Untrimmed and generously margined. Good+.

 

     Mentor, "a steady observer of the operation of our federal government since the year 1787," defends President Monroe against charges of "an undue partiality for monarchical Spain." The Administration is right to avoid war with Spain, despite American sympathy for Mexico and South America's "arduous contest against tyranny and oppression." But "we must not make war for the rights of other nations." Spain might consider recognition of the independence of these nations "a cause of war." Mentor urges "a strict regard to the constitutional restrictions."    

     Each of the four letters in this scarce pamphlet is signed in type at the end, 'Mentor.' No one seems to know who he is. It was written in the year that President Monroe and his Secretary of State, John Quincy Adams, acquired Florida from Spain.

Sabin 97137. AI 45901 [4]. Not in Eberstadt, Decker. OCLC 34875974 [3- Yale, Am. Phil. Soc., Lib. Cong.] as of March 2017.                                                                               $450.00

 

103.   [Mexico]: CONSTITUCION POLITICA DEL ESTADO LIBRE Y SOBERANO DE SAN LUIS POTOSI, DECRETADA EL 13 DE JULIO DE 1861 Y SANCIONADA EN 27 DEL MISMO MES Y ANO. S.L. Potosi: Tipografia del Gobierno a cargo de Abraham A. Exiga, 1861. 4-1/4" x 5-3/4". Original printed salmon wrappers, with wrapper title as issued, decorative border, and attractive ornament on rear wrapper. 38pp. Very Good.

OCLC 20390594 [2- Lib. Cong., UC- Berkeley] as of March 2017.                         $300.00

 

104.   Mifflin, Thomas: PRINTED DOCUMENT, COMPLETED IN MANUSCRIPT AND SIGNED BY PENNSYLVANIA GOVERNOR THOMAS MIFFLIN AND SECRETARY ALEXANDER DALLAS, APPOINTING LEWIS RUSH AS ENSIGN OF A LIGHT INFANTRY COMPANY BELONGING TO THE SECOND BATTALION OF MILITIA IN THE CITY & LIBERTIES OF PHILADELPHIA, MAY 4, 1791. Philadelphia: Francis Bailey. 15-1/4" x 13", paper seal of the State of Pennsylvania, elaborate typographic ornament; printed typescript with a variety of elegant type sizes and fonts. Signed beneath the seal, in the wide left margin, by Mifflin ['Tho. Mifflin']; and at the bottom by Dallas ['A.J. Dallas'] as Secretary. A few light fox marks. Several short fold separations repaired on blank verso, no text or manuscript loss. Very Good.

 

     Mifflin was a major general in the Continental Army, a member of the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly, a Continental Congressman from Pennsylvania, President of the Continental Congress, and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He served as Speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, President of the Pennsylvania Supreme Executive Council and as the first Governor of Pennsylvania.

     Dallas had a similarly star-spangled career: first Reporter of Decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of the Commonwealth of PA, U.S. Attorney for Eastern Pennsylvania, etc., etc.                                                           $500.00

 

Two Rare South Carolina Almanacs, Each With

“Calendar of Fasts, Festivals, Observed by the Israelites”

 

105.   Miller, A.E.: MILLER'S PLANTERS' AND MERCHANTS' ALMANAC FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1845...FOR THE STATES OF CAROLINA & GEORGIA... TO WHICH IS ANNEXED. A LIST OF THE CHIEF OFFICERS OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, AND OF THE STATE OF SOUTH-CAROLINA, CITY OF CHARLESTON, &C. WITH THE TIMES OF HOLDING COURTS; AND MUCH OTHER GENERAL INFORMATION; WITH A GARDENER'S CALENDAR, PREPARED FOR THIS ALMANAC SOME YEARS AGO. Charleston, S.C.: Printed by Miller & Browne, [1844]. [48] pp, plus interleaves [usually blank, a couple of contemporary notes]. 'Second Edition' at head of title. Bound in rare contemporary printed and decorated green boards, rear board advertising "Miller & Brown, Book and Job Printers, At the Old Stand, No. 4 Broad-Street..." Text browned. Very Good.

 

     The Almanac includes a "Calendar of Fasts, Festivals, and other days, Observed by the Israelites. For the Year 5605"; information on the militia, Police of the City of Charleston, South Carolina College, Free Schools, Medical Societies and Colleges, Banks, Insurance Companies, the Post Office, South Carolina Railroad, an article on cultivation of the fig tree, and items promised by the title.

Drake 13349 [not locating the first edition]. II Turnbull 495. Not in Singerman or Rosenbach.                                                                                                                              $850.00

 

106.   Miller, A.E.: MILLER'S PLANTERS' AND MERCHANTS' ALMANAC FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1829... TO WHICH IS ANNEXED, A LIST OF THE CHIEF OFFICERS OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT STATE OF SOUTH-CAROLINA AND CITY OF CHARLESTON; TOGETHER WITH THE LATE ELECTIONS & OTHER IMPORTANT ARTICLES. Charleston, S.C.: Printed, Published and Sold by A.E. Miller, [1828. [48] pp. Disbound, browned. 'Second Edition' at head of title. Good+

 

     The Almanac includes a "Calendar of Fasts, Festivals, and other days, Observed by the Israelites. For the Year 5589"; an illustration of the anatomy; information on the militia, Police of the City of Charleston, South Carolina College, Free Schools, Medical Societies and Colleges, Banks, Insurance Companies, the Post Office, South Carolina Railroad, "Value of Foreign Coins in the Money of the United States," Engine and Fire Companies, a Gardener's Calendar, Rates of Charleston Steam Boats, Roads in South Carolina, an advertisement for Clements Ferry, an article on agriculture in South Carolina, Pilots for the bar and harbor of Charleston, pilotage rates, and items promised by the title.

Drake 13264. II Turnbull 184 [first edition]. Not in Singerman or Rosenbach. As of March 2017 OCLC records a single copy of the third edition [AAS], a single copy of the first edition [Emory], and none of our second edition.                                                                        $850.00

 

107.   Minot, George Richards: AN ADDRESS TO THE MEMBERS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE FIRE SOCIETY, AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 29, 1795. BY...VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY. Boston: Orrery Press: Printed by Alexander Martin, 1795. 23, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, scattered light fox and wear, Good+.

 

     Minot was the leading historian of Massachusetts, especially of Shays' Rebellion, and a founder of the Massachusetts Historical Society. This pamphlet prints the Society's Act of Incorporation at pages 13-14; and names of Subscribers at pages 15-23, including Paul Revere, Jeremy Belknap, James Bowdoin, and other eminences. Minot discusses the Society's purposes: "Since there are evils beyond the power of man to prevent, it is his duty to alleviate their effects, and minister consolation to the objects who are destined to endure them. Such is the principle on which you, Gentlemen, are associated." Minot recalls the "calamitous" fires that Boston has suffered.

FIRST EDITION. Evans 29086.                                                                                $250.00

 

Definitive Work on Shays’ Rebellion

 

108.   Minot, George Richards: THE HISTORY OF THE INSURRECTIONS, IN MASSACHUSETTS, IN THE YEAR MDCCLXXXVI, AND THE REBELLION CONSEQUENT THEREON. Worcester: Isaiah Thomas, 1788. [4], [5]-192 pp. Contemporary plain wrappers [worn]. Foxed, untrimmed, generously margined. Good+. Contemporary ownership signature, 'Elijah Brigham,' probably the Massachusetts Federalist of that era.

 

     This is the definitive work on Shays' Rebellion, a signal event in creating support for the Constitution's promise of a stronger national government. In August and September 1786 financially strapped western Massachusetts farmers, whose pleas for the issuance of paper money had gone unheeded, forced the Court of Common Pleas, and then the Supreme Court at Springfield, to adjourn. Shays led the insurgents' charge on the Springfield Armory in January 1787, but they were beaten back. The weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation were thus exposed; the Rebellion spurred adoption of the Constitution. 

FIRST EDITION. Evans 21259. Howes M651aa. Sabin 49324. Nichols 142. Larned 1659. Gephart 8826.                                                                                                                        $750.00

 

Anti-Tariff Report from Committee Chaired by Charleston’s

Most Prominent Jewish Citizen

 

109.   [Mordecai, M(oses) C(ohn)]: ANSWERS BY THE CHARLESTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, TO QUESTIONS PROPOUNDED BY THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY. [Charleston: 1845]. 24pp. Modern plain wrappers. The title page is preceded by a leaf [with two light rubberstamps in blank upper and lower margins], signed in type by the Chamber's Secretary, William B. Heriot, printing the Chamber's resolutions approving the Answers. Except as noted, Very Good.

 

     Mordecai, Charleston's most prominent Jewish citizen, chaired the Committee preparing these Answers. "At various times, he was vice-president of the Charleston Ancient Artillery Society, a member of the board of health, captain of the Marion Artillery, a member of the committee on civic improvements, warden of police, commissioner of markets, a delegate to the Augusta Convention, a commissioner of pilotage, state representative, state senator, and director of the Southwestern Railroad Bank, the Gas Light Company, the South Carolina Insurance Company, and the Farmers' and Exchange Bank" [online findagrave.com].

     The questions propounded by U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert Walker concerned the effect of the tariff on South Carolina's economy. Appointed by President Polk, who favored low tariffs, Walker doubtless hoped that the Committee would respond as it did: that South Carolina was "injuriously affected by the present high duties." The Answers demonstrate "the unequal operation of the existing tariff system, its devastating influence upon the industry of the country generally, and upon the interests of the planting States more especially." The Tariff of 1846, known as the 'Walker Tariff,' would substantially reduce existing tariffs.

OCLC 23978567 [6] as of March 2017 [all locations north of the Mason Dixon line except for the University of North Carolina]. III Turnbull 1.                                                     $750.00

 

Early Reports from the Masonic National Grand Lodge of Color

 

110.   National Grand Lodge of Color: MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS OF THE TRIENNIAL SESSION OF THE NATIONAL GRAND LODGE, A. Y. M., HELD IN PHILADELPHIA, JULY, 1856. Philadelphia: Brown's Steam-Power Book and Job Printing Office, 1856. Original printed wrappers, stitched, 48pp. Light wrapper chipping, occasional light foxing, Good+.

 

      "The  National Grand Lodge was authentically established, and started out on her mission of beneficent uplift work among our people of color on June 24, 1847 in Boston, Massachusetts" [mwnationalgrandlodge.org]. This pamphlet prints the organization's founding documents. On June 24, 1847, "A Convention of Representatives of the State Grand Lodges of Color" was held in Boston, and unanimously adopted a Resolution to organize themselves as a National Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Ancient York Masons. Officers and constituent African-American Masonic organizations are listed. The "Declaration of Sentiments of the Great National Convention" [June 23, 1847] and the Constitution of the National Grand Lodge [June 24, 1847] are printed. The Declaration denies that there is "any good reason" for requiring "separate organizations of White and Colored Masons." In view of such "oppression," the organizers declared themselves the "National Grand Lodge of Color."

     Officers, Minutes of the Triennial Session, and its participants are printed, along with membership and other reports of the constituent Lodges. We have not located printings of any earlier Session reports of this African-American Lodge.

OCLC 476621862 [1- Mus. Nat. Heritage] [the series, 1856-1874] [as of April 2017].

                                                                                                                                    $1,250.00

 

111.   National Grand Lodge of Color: PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH TRIENNIAL SESSION OF THE MOST WORSHIPFUL NATIONAL GRAND LODGE OF FREE AND ACCEPTED ANCIENT YORK MASONS OF THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA. HELD IN THE CITY OF BALTIMORE, OCTOBER, A.D. 1865.-- A.L. 5865. Philadelphia: D.E. Thompson, Printer, 1866. Original printed wrappers [chipped along spine and extremities]. Stitched. 79, [1 blank] pp. Loosened, some blank edges brittle. Good+.

 

      This pamphlet prints the Organization's doings at its Triennial Session, and the 1847 Constitution and Declaration of Sentiments of the National Grand Lodge. It prints much material from the Lodge in Haiti, as well as the other member lodges.

OCLC 4476609380 [1- Mus. Nat. Heritage] as of April 2017.                                  $750.00

 

Rare, Evidently Unrecorded Texas Political Broadside

 

112.   [Neill, Andrew]: TO THE PUBLIC. FACTS AGAINST ASSERTIONS--- PROOF AGAINST DENUNCIATIONS. [Galveston?]: 1859. Folio sheet, folded to 8-3/8" x 11-1/4". [4]pp, each page printed in three columns. Toned. Old fold lines, a couple of short tears [no text loss] and a few pinholes [no text loss]. A rare, apparently unrecorded imprint. Good+. Signed and dated in type at the end, "August 5th '59."

 

     Neill was a Texas lawyer who had fought in its War of Independence. Engaged also in politics, he lost his election for Lieutenant Governor in 1855. His papers are at the University of Texas. Neill opposed Thomas Waul's run for Congress against Andrew Hamilton in 1859. Waul, a lawyer and plantation owner, would become a Confederate Congressman and a soldier for the Confederacy. [See, Handbook of Texas].

      Neill says that Waul's "conduct has been illiberal, ungentlemanly, and cowardly." Buttressing his charges with documentation, Neill charges that Waul had pillaged an estate "of which he was trustee," taking for himself “some of the slaves, that belonged to the estate." Some of those slaves were the subject of sales transactions between Waul and Robert E. Lee.

Not in Eberstadt, Sabin, Decker, Raines, Rader, Graff. As of March 2016 we do not locate this rarity on OCLC or the online sites of AAS, Yale, Harvard, SMU, U TX., NYPL, Newberry, Library of Congress.                                                                                                  $2,750.00

 

 

 

Alexander Hamilton’s Neutrality Act

 

113.   Neutrality Act [Alexander Hamilton]: THIRD CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES: AT THE FIRST SESSION... AN ACT IN ADDITION TO THE ACT FOR THE PUNISHMENT OF CERTAIN CRIMES AGAINST THE UNITED STATES. [Philadelphia: Childs & Swaine? 1794]. [3], [1 blank] pp. Caption title, as issued. Docketed in ink on page [4]. Mild foxing, Very Good.

 

     Alexander Hamilton drafted the Neutrality Act. "A bill drafted by Hamilton, and intended to penalize infractions of neutrality, was introduced in the Senate February 12, 1794...  These sections, practically unchanged, constitute the present so-called Neutrality Laws of the United States" [Warren].

     The conduct of Citizen Genet was the stimulus for its passage. Anglophiles resented Genet’s attempt to stir up American military support for France in its war with England. Upon Genet's arrival in the United States he issued privateering commissions, authorizing the capture of British vessels on the high seas. Genet exacerbated already-existing tensions between Jeffersonians, who strongly supported France, and Federalists, who were suspicious of the French Revolution. President Washington's Neutrality Proclamation in April 1793 established American policy "to pursue a conduct friendly and impartial toward belligerent powers." It warned citizens "carefully to avoid all acts and proceedings whatsoever which may in any manner tend to contravene such dispositions."

     The Neutrality Act criminalized any citizen's acceptance and exercise, within U.S. territory, of a commission "to serve a foreign prince or state in war." Any person who enlisted, or traveled to enlist "in the service of any foreign prince or state as a soldier... shall be deemed guilty of a high misdemeanor." Involvement in outfitting a vessel for war with any country "with whom the United States are at peace" was made a crime; any person preparing a "military expedition or enterprize" with any nation with whom the United States was at peace was also guilty. The Act is signed in type at the end by Frederick Muhlenberg, Speaker of the House; Ralph Izard, President of the Senate; and George Washington; and Approved, June 5, 1794.

Evans 27869. NAIP w014503 [5]. See, Charles Warren, Assistant Attorney General, MEMORANDUM ON THE HISTORY AND SCOPE OF THE LAWS PROHIBITING CORRESPONDENCE WITH A FOREIGN GOVERNMENT, AND ACCEPTANCE OF A COMMISSION TO SERVE A FOREIGN STATE IN WAR. October 1915, printed at democraticthinker.wordpress.com/2010/06/26/history-of-the-neutrality-act.            $5,000.00

 

114.   [New Orleans Confederate Imprint] Randall, James R.; G.M. Loening: ELEGY ON THE DEATH OF LT. COL. CHAS. DREUX. KILLED IN DEFENDING HIS COUNTRY ON THE 5TH OF JULY 1861 IN THE VICINITY OF YORKTOWN VA. WORDS BY JAMES R. RANDALL. MUSIC BY G.M. LOENING. New Orleans: Published by the Author. 96 Canal St., [1861]. 10" x 12-1/2". 5, [1 blank] pp. Words and music. Disbound, thin paper strip along blank inner margin. At head of title: "Dedicated to the Friends & Companions in arms of the Deceased Warrior." Decorated title page, different type styles, engraving by W.H. Leeson of New Orleans, depicting Dreux's gravestone, surrounded by flowers. Lightly foxed, Good+. Later ownership signature at blank top margin.

 

     "Weep, Louisiana, weep..." A rare Confederate imprint.

Parrish & Willingham 6986 [4- Yale, Lib. Cong., Boston Athenaeum, Tulane]. Not in Jumonville. OCLC 793004252 [1- Boston Athenaeum] as of March 2017.                     $450.00

 

 

Rare Mississippi Broadside

 

115.   Newton, A.: TRUE BAPTIST. THE TRUE BAPTIST IS DESIGNED TO FILL A SPACE WHICH IS NOT OCCUPIED, AND TO MEET A WANT WHICH IS NOT MET, BY ANY OTHER PUBLICATION IN OUR COUNTRY... Jackson, Mississippi: December, 1853. Broadside, 12-3/8" x 19". Text printed in two columns surrounded by a decorative border. Generously margined. Old folds, light foxing, one pinhole at center fold. Good+.

   [with] Printed Receipt for John Young's Subscription to The True Baptist: $3.00 paid, signed by Newton in ink.

 

     The True Baptist was a monthly publication during 1853 and part of 1854. OCLC records a few locations for the periodical, but none for this broadside solicitation, which appears to be unrecorded. The True Baptist's "class of subjects which it proposes to discuss, is claiming a very large share of public attention in the South-west.... All persons desiring to arrive at satisfactory conclusions on the questions respecting the mode and design of baptism, infant baptism, communion, creeds, confessions and the revision of the English Scriptures, &c., &c., ought to take the True Baptist." Promising Subscribers a very good deal on Volume 1, "making near four hundred pages," Newton says, "We must have more subscribers."

Not located on OCLC as of March 2017, or the online sites of AAS, Harvard, U TX, and the Library of Congress.                                                                                                        $1,500.00

 

Early American Baseball Book, Profusely Illustrated

 

116.   Ostewig, Kinnie A.: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LEE BASE BALL TEAMS FOR THE PAST TWO OR THREE YEARS. COMPILED BY KINNIE A. OSTEWIG. Chicago: W.B. Conkey Company, [1897]. Original staples and printed wrappers [mild wear, a couple of spots]. 138pp. Portrait frontis of the author, other full-page portraits of his fellow ballplayers throughout the book. Near Fine.

 

     This book illuminates early years of baseball in the American midwest. Ostewig was born in Lee, Illinois, "eighteen years ago," graduated "with high honors" from the High School of Shabbona Illinois in June 1895, at the age of sixteen, and remained in the Lee area for the rest of his life. He would become a member of the Lee City Council; in 1912, he would lose the Republican primary for Lieutenant Governor of Illinois by a substantial margin.

     Writing here, he is pitcher and Manager of the Lee Liners, organized in August 1895. His book describes the exciting games played by and against the Liners; and a biography, with photo illustrations, of each teammate. The book is rare, OCLC recording only a few copies.

OCLC 14076788 [2- Chicago History Museum, Rockford Pub. Lib.], 61772259 [1- Baseball Hall of Fame] as of March 2017.                                                                                   $1,250.00

 

117.   [Pearl Harbor]: INVESTIGATION OF THE PEARL HARBOR ATTACK. Washington: GPO, 1946. Senate Document No. 244 (79th Congress, 2d Session). Octavo. xvi, 580pp. 3 folding maps. Complete as issued in the original publisher's cloth. Two ink stamps on the front free endpaper, else very good with no other markings. Boards moderately soiled. Very Good.

 

     The scarce final report, with the minority views of Homer Ferguson and Owen Brewster. FIRST EDITION.                                                                                                      $500.00

 

118.   [Pennsylvania]: REPORT ON PUNISHMENTS AND PRISON DISCIPLINE: BY THE COMMISSIONERS APPOINTED TO REVISE THE PENAL CODE OF PENNSYLVANIA... SECOND EDITION. Philadelphia: John Clarke, 1827. [2], 77, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, bit of blank extremity wear. Last leaf with a tear, repaired on verso without text loss. Good+.

 

     The Commissioners recommend continuing the ban on capital punishment; reject mutilation, branding, public whipping, and exile as a form of punishment; and examine in great detail the issue of solitary confinement

AI 34693 and Cohen 3742 [each citing only our "second" edition].             $175.00

 

119.   People's Pacific Railroad Company: CHARTER, ORGANIZATION, ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT, JOSIAH PERHAM, WITH THE BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS. Boston: Alfred Mudge & Son, 1860. 24pp, a clean text, stitched in original printed wrappers [light wrapper chipping, spine reinforced]. Very Good.

 

     "The route was from St. Joseph, along the Platte, the Pike's Peak gold fields, and through Utah to San Francisco" [Eberstadt]. The Company, financed by many small shareholders rather than federal subsidies, was chartered in Maine. President Perham's Address, setting forth the Company's bold plans, waxes, "Maine, by granting this charter, is extending her hand for a friendly and firm grasp with California, now separate from the land of gold by a sail of 100 days around the Cape, or by seven thousand miles across the Isthmus." These plans were dashed by the Central Pacific Railroad route in 1862.

132 Eberstadt 620. Bureau of Railway Economics, page 253. Not in Sabin.                        $450.00

 

120.   [Philadelphia Fire Company]: NOTICE. THE HAND IN HAND FIRE COMPANY HAVE APPOINTED THEIR NEXT MEETING TO BE AT OELLERS'S, ON THE FIRST MONDAY IN APRIL, AT SEVEN O'CLOCK IN THE EVENING. FRIDAY, MARCH 31, 1797. [Philadelphia]: 1797. 5-3/4" x 3-1/2", oblong. Attractively printed ticket, signed in ink "J.B. Bordley Clk." Fine.

 

     An early fire company ephemeron. "The 'hand in hand' name and clasped hand symbol were popular among volunteer fire fighting companies and fire insurance companies during this period. It symbolized the mutual assistance needed to combat fires and the fraternal ties of fire companies prevalent in early American communities. This Hand in Hand Fire Company was founded March 1st 1741, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and located in the Dockward at the Fish Market and Drawbridge" [website of the National Museum of American History].

     "In 1791, James Oeller opened his eponymous hotel, Philadelphia's first, at Sixth and Chestnut Streets. Oeller's assembly room, decorated with French wallpaper and antique illustrations, challenged the City Tavern as Philadelphia's finest banquet space" [Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia]. Bordley, a prominent agriculturist, was a founder of the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture.                                                                                    $175.00

 

A Prominent Philadelphia Black Minister’s Rare Historical Discourse

 

121.   Phillips, Henry L.: CHURCH OF THE CRUCIFIXION PHILADELPHIA, PA. SEMI-CENTENNIAL. MAY, 1847- MAY, 1897. A HISTORICAL DISCOURSE DELIVERED BY REV. HENRY L. PHILLIPS. MAY 16TH, 1897. [Philadelphia: 1897]. Original staples and printed wrappers [reinforced with clear tape along spine]. Portrait frontis of Reverend Phillips, plus 46 pages [two full-page sketches of the church]. Very Good.

 

     The online site of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas prints a brief biography of this African American minister: "Henry L. Phillips was born in Jamaica, West Indies in 1847. He was ordained as Episcopal priest in Philadelphia by Bishop William Bacon Stevens in 1875. He began his ministry at the Crucifixion Mission on South 8th Street. It became one of the leading churches in the nation for its social programs, which included the creation of the first penny savings bank for Negroes in the United States; the expansion and growth of the Home for the Homeless, the only facility of its kind in the city for destitute women and children of both races and the first Philadelphia gymnasium for Blacks out of which grew the Christian Street YMCA. Phillips served as rector of St. Thomas from 1912-1914 and was later appointed Archdeacon for Colored Work for the Episcopal Diocese of PA. He celebrated his 100th birthday in March 1947."

OCLC 13053698 [3- NYHS, NYPL, HSP] as of April 2017. Not in Blockson, LCP.

                                                                                                                                    $500.00

 

The Classic “Northern Man with Southern Principles”

 

122.   [Pierce, Franklin]: SKETCHES OF THE LIVES OF FRANKLIN PIERCE AND WM. R. KING, CANDIDATES OF THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICAN PARTY FOR THE PRESIDENCY AND VICE PRESIDENCY OF THE UNITED STATES. [np: National Democratic Executive Committee. 1852]. 36pp, caption title [as issued]. Disbound, lightly tanned, else Very Good. Contemporary inscription, "From George H. Busby." Busby was a Democratic Congressman from Ohio when this campaign pamphlet was published.

 

     By 1852 the Democratic Party faced mounting difficulty in fielding Presidential candidates acceptable to North and South. The formula was to find a 'Northern man with Southern principles'-- Lewis Cass in 1848, Franklin Pierce in 1852, and James Buchanan in 1856. The New Hampshire-born Pierce fit the bill: handsome, a Mexican War hero, sound on the slavery issue. His running mate, a North Carolina Democratic Senator, died a month after Inauguration Day.

FIRST EDITION. Miles 318. Sabin 62716n.                                                             $275.00

 

Last Confederate Imprint

 

123.   Pollard, Edward A.: OBSERVATIONS IN THE NORTH: EIGHT MONTHS IN PRISON AND ON PAROLE. Richmond: E.W. Ayres. 1865. vii, [1 blank], [9]-142 pp. Light spotting at upper forecorners. Original printed front wrapper [rubberstamp number], bound into later limp cloth with the later front cover detached but present. Else Very Good.

 

     Deemed the last Confederate imprint, 'Observations' was published in March 1865, as the City fell to Union troops. A journalist, Pollard was a passenger on a blockade runner seized by Union forces. Imprisoned at Fort Warren, he was later paroled.

Howes P457. Confederate Hundred 68. In Tall Cotton 149. P&W 4994.                 $750.00

 

Pope Corrects “The Strange Misapprehension of Facts” About

Second Manassas

 

124.   Pope, John: THE CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA, OF JULY AND AUGUST 1862. OFFICIAL REPORT OF MAJOR GENERAL JOHN POPE. Milwaukee: Jermain & Brightman, 1863. Original printed wrappers, stitched, 74pp. Minor wear. Near Fine.

 

     Seeking to rehabilitate his reputation, Pope rebuts "the strange misapprehension of facts concerning this campaign, which, though proceeding from irresponsible sources, has much possessed the public mind." At Second Manassas Pope was thoroughly defeated by the formidable triumvirate of Lee, Longstreet, and Jackson. He recounts "how difficult and how thankless was the duty devolved upon me...to confront with a small army vastly superior forces." An Appendix prints the Dispatches and Orders.

Bartlett 3884. III Dornbusch 1603. Nicholson 657.                                                   $450.00

 

Early American Military Manual, Dedicated to Anthony Wayne

 

125.   Rawson, Jonathan: A COMPENDIUM OF MILITARY DUTY, ADAPTED FOR THE MILITIA OF THE UNITED STATES; IN THREE PARTS... THE FIRST EDITION. THE SAFETY AND SECURITY OF A STATE DEPENDS UPON THE DISCIPLINE OF ITS MILITIA. Dover (N.H.): Elpihalet Ladd, for the Subscribers... 1793. ix, [1 blank], [11]-240, 251-305, [1 blank] pp, as issued with pagination errors [text complete]. Contemporary tree calf, spine rubbed, front hinge starting. Text Very Good. Contemporary inscription on front free endpaper: "Samuel Emerson's to John Barrell."

 

     Rawson had been Aide de Camp to General John Sullivan during the Revolution. In 1779 Sullivan led a brutal campaign against the Iroquois in western New York; soon thereafter he was forced into retirement , but he would serve as New Hampshire's governor from 1786-1789. Rawson's book, dedicated to Anthony Wayne, is a comprehensive, early American military manual. Drawing upon his own experiences, as well as those of von Steuben, Field Marshall Count Saxe, and the Chevalier de la Valiere, he presents the work in three parts: 1. The Duty of Soldiers in General; 2. The Manoeuvers and Evolutions of the Infantry, Artillery, and Cavalry; 3. Some Particular Instructions to Officers of the Partizan Corps. The Appendix prints the 1792 Militia Act.

     Samuel Emerson [1764-1851], a medical doctor born in New Hampshire, graduated from Harvard, settled in Kennebunk, Maine, and married Olive Barrell. John Barrell [1776-1867] was Olive's brother.

Evans 26054. NAIP w011902. Not in Nicholson.                                                      $1,500.00

 

Three Rare Rhode Island Broadsides about a Divisive Tax Dispute

 

126.   [Rhode Island]: AT A GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF RHODE-ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, JUNE 18, A.D. 1796. THE UNDERWRITTEN REPRESENTATIVES DISSENT FROM THE BILL FOR ESTABLISHING AN ESTIMATE OF THE VALUE OF RATEABLE PROPERTY IN THE SEVERAL TOWNS IN THIS STATE... [Providence]: Printed by G. Wheeler, [1796].  Broadside, 7-5/8" x 12-7/8". Light uniform toning, old folds, Very Good.

 

       This rare broadside objects to the General Assembly's "arbitrary and capricious" assessments for Providence and Bristol Counties. Providence is "estimated at more than double the Town of Newport." It is signed in type by fifteen Representatives, headed by Welcome Arnold. Also printed is a unanimous Resolution of the Providence Town Meeting held on June 23, 1796: "That no Assessment of this Town's Apportionment of the State Tax, as ordered by the General Assembly, at their June Session, shall be made by the Assessors of this Town; such Apportionment being manifestly unconstitutional." Beneath that is another Vote of the Providence Town Meeting to publicize the foregoing Protests.  

     "A minority report of representatives dissenting from a recently enacted tax law; signed by Welcome Arnold and fourteen others. Followed by attested records of town meetings held in Providence June 23 and 29, 1796, declaring the act was unconstitutional" [NAIP].

Evans 31095. Alden 1491. NAIP w010487 [4].                                                         $750.00

 

127.   [Rhode Island]: (CIRCULAR.) GENTLEMEN, THE FREEMEN OF THE TOWN OF PROVIDENCE, DEEPLY IMPRESSED WITH THE INEQUALITY AND INJUSTICE OF THE ESTIMATE OF THE RATEABLE PROPERTY OF THE STATE, AS REPORTED BY SEVEN OF THE STATE'S COMMITTEE, AND ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY... [Providence: 1796]. Broadside, 12-3/4" x 15-1/2", dated in type at the top, "Providence, June 29th, 1796." Six paragraphs in two columns separated by a decorative vertical line. A short, closed margin tear; a small pinhole slightly affecting a letter; light toning. Irregular bottom edge. Very Good. Signed in ink at the bottom "In Behalf of the Town" by Jabez Bowen, Moderator.

 

       This scarce broadside invites "other towns to choose delegates to a meeting to be held in Providence July 26, 1796, in opposition to the tax estimate recently enacted by the state, and to devise means for securing redress." A public outcry resulted from the legislation; citizens of Providence and some other towns charged that they had been taxed unfairly and excessively. The Circular denounces "the glaring inconsistency of an Estimate, by which enormous additions were made to some Towns, and the advantages to be derived from those additions confined to a few, who had no greater claim to relief than others, but obtained it by their influence in the Committee." Charges of corruption and misfeasance are legion. 

Evans 31059. Alden 1481. NAIP w011880 [4].                                                         $750.00

 

128.   [Rhode Island] Dorrance, John: TO THE FREEMEN OF THE STATE OF RHODE-ISLAND. IT HAVING BEEN REPRESENTED THAT MR. WILLIAM GREENE, AS ONE OF THE STATE'S COMMITTEE, CONDUCTED IMPROPERLY, I THINK IT A DUTY TO GIVE A TRUE STATE OF THAT BUSINESS IN RESPECT TO HIM... Providence: Printed by D. Wheeler, [1796]. Broadside, 9-1/8" x 11-1/2". Old fold lines, light wear and soil. Else Very Good, with irregular bottom edge.

 

      This apparently unrecorded broadside expresses public outrage over a State Committee's determination of the various rates at which Rhode Island towns would be taxed. Committeeman Greene was vilified for voting to increase taxes for certain towns. Dorrance defends Greene's honor and integrity, although Greene's views "differed very much from myself." Dorrance signs his name in type at the bottom, with the printed place and date: "Providence, August 26, 1796."

     John Dorrance [c.1747-1813], a native of Providence, graduated from Brown in 1774. He was a prominent businessman and Justice of the Court of Common Pleas. Governor Fenner accused Dorrance of having sold the body of a stranger who had committed suicide, in exchange for a beaver skin hat. Fenner used the charge to squash Dorrance's run for a seat in the General Assembly in 1801; Dorrance later sued for slander. 

Not in Evans, Shipton & Mooney, Bristol, NAIP, ESTC, Alden, or [as of March 2017] on the online sites of OCLC, Library of Congress, AAS, Brown University, Yale, Harvard.

                                                                                                                                    $1,500.00

 

129.   Richardson, David: RICHARDSON'S VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC, FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1845... Richmond: Drinker & Morris. [1844]. [36] pp, as issued. Stitched, lightly foxed, untrimmed. Very Good. The last page advertises Drinker & Morris, "(Late Smith & Palmer.) Booksellers, Stationers, and Book-Binders." It is preceded by two pages of advertisements by Petersburg, Alexandria, and Norfolk merchants.

 

     The Almanac offers agricultural advice. State officers, courts, judges, and local and national legislators are listed for Virginia and North Carolina.

Drake 14118. Swem 4558. AI 44-5320 [4].                                                               $250.00

 

“Revelations of the Inside History of the District Government”

 

130.   Riddle, A[lbert] G[allatin]: CLOSING ARGUMENT OF THE HON. A.G. RIDDLE, FOR THE PROSECUTION, AT THE TRIAL OF HIRAM C. WHITLEY, RICHARD HARRINGTON, AND ARTHUR B. WILLIAMS, FOR CONSPIRACY, IN THE CRIMINAL COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, NOVEMBER 23, 24, AND 25, 1874. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1874. Original printed wrappers, 214pp. Wraps chipped at extremities. Very Good.

 

     Riddle represented the United States in a bizarre case involving the theft of documents from a vault in the office of the Washington, D.C. District Attorney. Those indicted included the Chief, Assistant Chief, and a clerk of the U.S. Secret Service; an assistant U.S. attorney; and a prominent Washington criminal lawyer. The purpose of the theft was to obtain documents for use in an investigation.

     The case received great attention for "the revelations of the inside history of the District government, for its novelty, and from the curious tissue of circumstantial evidence developed at the trial..." 9 American Law Review 351 [1875]. 

FIRST EDITION. II Harv. Law Cat. 468.                                                                  $275.00

 

A Rare Work by the Vigilance Committee

 

131.   San Francisco Vigilance Committee: PICTORIAL LETTER SHEET SHOWING 'FORT VIGILANT ROOMS OF THE COMMITTEE SACRAMENTO ST. BETN. DAVIS & FRONT' [and] 'MASS MEETING ENDORSING THE ACTS OF THE VIGILANCE COMMITTEE JUNE 14TH'. [with] CONSTITUTION AND ADDRESS OF THE VIGILANCE COMMITTEE... ADOPTED, MAY 15, 1856. [San Francisco]: Lith. Britton & Rey, [1856]. Two leaves, unnumbered, on a single folio sheet folded to 8-3/8" x 10-5/8". One page has the two illustrations, which are in excellent condition. The final leaf prints the Committee's Constitution and Address, which has scuffing to portions of some letters. Good+.

 

     The front of this rare letter sheet displays two engraved images, lithographed from daguerreotypes by the influential and pioneering San Francisco photographer, Robert Vance. The upper image, "Rooms of the Committee...," depicts the Committee's headquarters, an imposing two-story building defended by armed guards and cannons. Filled gunny sacks and a cannon guard the entrance; ship masts are in the background. The lower image, "Mass Meeting...," shows the crowded assembly. Speakers address the crowd from the balcony of a building festooned with two large American flags.

     The conjugate leaf prints, in three columns, the Constitution and Address of the Vigilance Committee. They explain the breakdown of law and order, and the Committee's mission "for maintenance of the peace and good order of society - the prevention and punishment of crime - the preservation of our lives and property, and to insure that our ballot-boxes shall hereafter express the actual and unforged will of the majority of our citizens."

OCLC 43694738 [1- Lib. Cong.], 191115824 [no locations] as of March 2017.      $2,250.00

 

132.   [Schooner Amistad]: SCHOONER "AMISTAD." MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, TRANSMITTING A REPORT FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE, RELATIVE TO THE SCHOONER "AMISTAD." JANUARY 27, 1844. HED 83. 28th Cong., 1st. Sess. [Washington: 1844]. 21, [3 blanks] pp. Caption title [as issued], disbound and loose, with a bit of blank extremity chipping. Good+.

 

     President Tyler transmits Spain's diplomatic correspondence with Secretary of State Daniel Webster concerning compensation to the Spanish owners of the Amistad, which had been captured by an American vessel, brought to the United States, and its cargo-- Africans destined for slavery-- freed.                                                                                      $250.00

 

“General Scott’s Life in a Nutshell”

 

133.   [Scott, Winfield]: DIE PRASIDENTSCHAFT- WINFIELD SCOTT - FRANKLIN PIERCE... [Washington: Towers, 1852]. 15, [1 blank] pp. Caption title [as issued]. Disbound, scattered light foxing. Good+ or so.

 

     This is the rare German-language printing of Miles 341, supporting General Winfield Scott, the last Whig presidential candidate. Franklin Pierce, his Democratic opponent, is found wanting on a number of issues. Miles notes that page 15 of this title adds a section entitled, 'Das Leben General Scott's in einer Nuttshale' ['General Scott's Life in a Nutshell']. 

FIRST EDITION. Miles 340. OCLC records only a note to a microform copy [OCLC 318390981] as of February 2017.                                                                                    $350.00

 

“The Tenure by Which We Hold Our Slaves,

Is Daily Becoming Less Secure”

 

134.   Seabrook, Whitemarsh B.: A CONCISE VIEW OF THE CRITICAL SITUATION, AND FUTURE PROSPECTS OF THE SLAVE-HOLDING STATES, IN RELATION TO THEIR COLOURED POPULATION. Charleston: A.E. Miller, 1825. 30pp. Disbound, small stitching holes in blank inner margin. Light foxing. Good+.

 

     "The tenure by which we hold our slaves, is daily becoming less secure, and more the subject of acrimonious animadversion." Only base motives could cause people to portray American slavery "in such false and revolting colours." He warns of the coming storm: resolutions have urged gradual emancipation and the use of receipts from public land sales to fund emancipation and colonization, and encourage "extinguishment of the relation of master and servant." The African Colonization Society is petitioning Congress for financial assistance to rid the slaveholding States of their Negroes; abolitionists are stirring; the press engages in "unbridled fanaticism."

     This is the first of two editions, each published in the same year. The second edition adds a Table at page 28. Otherwise the content is the same. Each edition ends with Note A and Note B, printed here at page 30 but in the second edition at page 31. The collation by Sabin and Howes of this first edition omits the final page with Notes A and B.

FIRST EDITION. LCP 9242. OCLC 3234805 [9] as of January 2017. II Turnbull 145 [2d edition, incorrect collation]. Howes S250. Sabin 78548. Not in Work or Blockson.

                                                                                                                                    $750.00

 

A Political Veteran Writes Insightfully on the Election of 1844,

The Know-Nothings, and the Anti-Slavery Liberty Party

 

135.   Seward, William H.: AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED TO E.A. STANSBURY, ESQ., DATED FROM AUBURN, NEW YORK, OCTOBER 28, 1844, REGARDING THE 1844 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN. MARKED "[PRIVATE]", THE LETTER IS A THOROUGH, KNOWLEDGEABLE ANALYSIS OF THE HIGHLY CHARGED ELECTION, INCLUDING DISCUSSION OF THE INFLUENCE OF THE LIBERTY PARTY AND THE ANTI-CATHOLIC KNOW-NOTHINGS.

     "... IT WOULD BE AS UNWISE FOR ME TO PROPHECY THE RESULT OF AN ELECTION SO NEAR AT HAND AS IT WAS FOR THE VERY LEARNED DIVINE IN YOUR STATE TO FIX SO SHORT A DAY FOR THE FULFILMENT OF THE SCRIPTURES. I THINK THAT MR. CLAY HAS A CHANCE IN PENNSYLVANIA AND FROM KENTUCKY AND OHIO I RECEIVE CONFIDENT ASSURANCES OF HIS SUCCESS IN VIRGINIA WHICH MY OWN JUDGMENT DOES NOT QUITE ADMIT. AT THE WORST NEW YORK IS A DEBATABLE STATE. SINCE THIS MEANS CLAY NEEDS BUT ONE AND MR. POLK ALL THREE OF THESE STATES, THE PROBABILITIES OF THE SUCCESS OF THE PLANS ARE VERY STRONG AND TO MY MIND SATISFACTORY.

     "BUT WHAT OF NEW YORK? I SEE THE SEETHING OF THE POLITICAL CAULDRON AS YOU SEE IT, AND I HAVE THE SAME DIFFICULTY IN CONJECTING WHAT WILL BE THE NATURE OF THE SEDIMENT. HE IS MAD, BE HE OF WHATEVER PARTY HE MAY, WHO CONFIDENTLY PROMISES ABOUT IT. THE MASSES WHO CAN BE MOVED BY ARGUMENTS IN FAVOR OF GOOD ADMINISTRATION AND ULTIMATE NATIONAL SECURITY ARE THOROUGHLY WORRIED AND WILL GIVE A VAST VOTE. ON THE OTHER HAND THOSE WHO CAN BE EXCITED BY PERSONAL PREJUDICE; BY FEARS OF OPPRESSIVE AND PROSCRIPTIVE ARISTOCRACY ARE ROUSED AND HEATED MORE THAN IN 1840. IT MIGHT NOT BE QUITE EASY TO FORESEE THE RESULT IF AS HERETOFOR IT DEPENDED ON THE RELATIVE STRENGTH OF THESE MASSES ONLY. BUT THERE IS THE LIBERTY PARTY, WHICH DURING THE PAST THREE YEARS HAS BEEN SUFFERED BY OUR FAULT TO WITHDRAW FROM US MORE THAN ANY MAJORITY THE WHIG PARTY EVER HAD. THE PARTY HAS HAD NEVER A LARGE PORTION OF THE NATURALIZING MASS BUT ALWAYS A FEW OF THAT DESCRIPTION WHICH WAS WORTHY OF RESPECT AND CONSIDERATION. THE HORRIBLE CIVIL AND RELIGIOUS INTOLERANCE IN THE CITIES OF PHILADELPHIA AND NEW YORK FOSTERED BY TOO MANY WHIGS HAS DRIVEN NEARLY ALL OF THE EMIGRANT CITIZENS FROM US. THEY SAY AND I BELIEVE THAT THE CITY WILL COMPENSATE FOR THE LOSS BY AN EQUAL MAJORITY OF NATIVE AMERICANS IN FAVOR OF MR. CLAY. I LOOK TO THIS RESULT THEREFORE THOUGH I NEED NOT SAY THAT IN MY OPINION A TRIUMPH THUS WON WILL BE RUINOUS AS IT MUST BE DISHONORABLE... THE LOCO FOCOS GAIN IN MY JUDGMENT FROM THE NATURALIZED CITIZENS AS MUCH AS THEY LOSE TO THE WHIGS, AND LOSE TO THE LIBERTY PARTY THOUGH NOT CONSIDERABLY. THE RESULT OF MY BEST OBSERVATION IS THAT THE TWO CHIEF PARTIES WILL BE NEARLY EQUAL THROUGHOUT THE STATES EXCEPT NEW YORK CITY AND THAT THE CITY DECIDES THE ELECTION. I BELIEVE IT WILL BE WHIG AND THEREFORE I EXPECT WITH NEARING CONFIDENCE THAT THE NATIONAL AND STATE TICKETS WILL BE ELECTED...

     BUT BE THE RESULT WHAT IT MAY, THERE WILL BE NO REASON TO DESPOND. MACHIAVELLI ADVISED THAT WHOEVER WOULD OVERTHROW A DEMOCRACY SHOULD SET IT UPON SOME GREAT ENTERPRISE... THE ACQUISITION OF TEXAS IS SUCH AN ENTERPRISE. BUT AN AGRICULTURALLY EXTENDED DEMOCRACY CAN RECEDE VERY EASILY, AND SUCH WILL BE THE RESULT OF THE FIRST EXPERIENCE OF EMBARRASSMENT. WE ONCE CONCEIVED THE GREAT ENTERPRISE OF CONQUERING CANADA, BUT ABANDONED IT SOON ENOUGH FOR SAFETY... 

     THE MISTAKE IF IT WAS SO OF MR. CLAY HAS BEEN MORE THAN COUNTERBALANCED BY THE BY THE ABSURD BLUNDER OF MR. BIRNEY, AND I FEEL QUITE CONFIDENT THAT THE CAUSE OF EMANCIPATION PRACTICAL WILL BE BENEFITTED BY THE SUCCESS OF OUR APPEALS TO THE PURE AND PATRIOTIC MASS OF THE LIBERTY PARTY... [3], [1- integral address page] pp. Completely in ink manuscript on two separate unlined sheets. Old folds, small area torn from the envelope page where wax seal was opened [a few letters lost]. Addressed to "E.A. Stansbury, Esq., Counsellor &c &c, Burlington, Vermont, 1 paid W.H.S." Very Good.

 

     A richly detailed letter in which the experienced and sophisticated Seward, former Whig Governor of New York and future United States Senator, contemplates the 1844 presidential election. He analyzes the relative strength of the two major parties and the two wild cards in that election: James Birney’s Liberty Party, and the Nativist Know Nothings. The Liberty Party weakens the Whigs by attracting anti-slavery men dissatisfied with the Whigs' tepid stance on Slavery. Candidate Clay sought to stem this tide of defections by opposing the annexation of Texas. Whether this tactic will succeed is unclear to Seward. As things turned out, the Liberty Party probably siphoned away enough Whig voters to throw the election to the Democrats and James K. Polk, who had urged Texas’s annexation. The Liberty Party would become the Free Soil Party in 1848, and eventually the Republican Party in 1854. One of the many results was the death of the Whig Party.                                                                                              $1,850.00

 

136.   Shaw, Lemuel: A CHARGE DELIVERED TO THE GRAND JURY FOR THE COUNTY OF ESSEX, AT THE SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT HELD AT IPSWICH. MAY TERM, 1832. Boston: Steam Power Press Office, 1832. 16pp. Stitched, untrimmed with wide margins. Light dusting, Very Good.

 

     An eloquent address by the Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, father-in-law of Herman Melville, and one of the great State judges. "Probably no other state judge has so deeply influenced commercial and constitutional law throughout the nation" [DAB]. Here he explains, "Our Government is peculiarly and emphatically a Government of laws." The entire Constitution, which seeks to curb the exercise of "absolute and arbitrary power," is "calculated to give full force and effect to this fundamental principle, and to carry it practically into effect." Moreover, our Constitution, in addition to barring one-man rule, "equally excludes the arbitrary will of mere numbers, and guards against the encroachments of a wild and licentious democracy."

FIRST EDITION. Cohen 4087. II Harv. Law Cat. 572. AI 14682 [5].                     $250.00

 

 

 

 

“The Most Complete Printed Record” of “The First Important and Intensive

Investigation” of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act

 

137.   [Sims, Thomas]: TRIAL OF THOMAS SIMS, ON AN ISSUE OF PERSONAL LIBERTY, ON THE CLAIM OF JAMES POTTER, OF GEORGIA, AGAINST HIM, AS AN ALLEGED FUGITIVE FROM SERVICE. ARGUMENTS OF ROBERT RANTOUL, JR. AND CHARLES G. LORING, WITH THE DECISION OF GEORGE T. CURTIS. BOSTON, APRIL 7-11, 1851. PHONOGRAPHIC REPORT BY JAMES W. STONE. Boston: Wm. S. Damrell & Co. 1851. 47, [1 blank] pp. Stitched. Scattered mild foxing, Very Good.

 

     Sims's trial was "the first important and intensive investigation of the meaning of the 1850" Fugitive Slave Act... This pamphlet is the most complete printed record of the case" [Finkelman 94, 91].

     Sims, a Savannah slave, stowed away on a Massachusetts-bound ship. Having intercepted a letter Sims had written to his wife, his master discovered his whereabouts. "The arrest of Sims led to the first extensive examination of the meaning and constitutionality of the new law. U.S. Senator Robert Rantoul, Jr., and Charles G. Loring argued Sims's case before Commissioner Curtis." Their efforts failed; Curtis rejected their vigorous attacks on the constitutionality of the Act, reported here. Later, Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw would sustain Curtis's decision.

FIRST EDITION. Finkelman 91. II De Renne 543. Dumond 111. II Harv. Law Cat. 1189. Cohen 11875. LCP 9436.                                                                                       $1,500.00

 

Rare, Early South Carolina Militia Laws

 

138.   [South Carolina]: LAWS AND REGULATIONS; FOR THE MILITIA OF THE STATE OF SOUTH-CAROLINA, DIRECTED TO BE PRESENTED TO EACH COMMISSIONED OFFICER, BY THE LEGISLATURE. Charleston: From the Press of Timothy and Mason, 1794. 12mo. 188, [5], [1 blank] pp, with half title, as issued. Frontis engraving [coat of arms with South Carolina and American flags, Screaming Eagle; original tissue guard] plus eight folded plates, collated as issued. Light foxing. Very Good, in modern calf and gilt-lettered red morocco spine label, with two modern bookplates on the front pastedown.

 

     A rare South Carolina imprint. The last page is an 'Explanation of the Plates.' The book prints the Act of the Second Congress "establishing an uniform militia throughout the United States"; South Carolina's "Act to organize the militia... in conformity with the Act of Congress"; "Rules and articles" of war, according to resolve of Congress, September 20, 1776; "Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States."  

FIRST EDITION. Evans 27720. Gould & Morgan 1074. Cohen 8960. I Turnbull 305. ESTC W8505 [6].                                                                                                             $15,000.00

 

139.   South Carolina College: LAWS OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA COLLEGE, ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING IN DECEMBER, 1835. TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED THE ACT OF INCORPORATION, AND THE SUBSEQUENT ACTS PASSED IN AMENDMENT THERETO. Columbia, S.C.: Printed by A.S. Johnston, 1836. 51, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, foxed, Good+.

 

     This scarce item prints the relevant Acts of the Legislature, and the Trustees' enactments concerning admission, fees, dress code, conduct, course of instruction, discipline, housing.

II Turnbull 368. AI 40260 [1- U SC]. OCLC records eight locations as of March 2017.

                                                                                                                                    $450.00

 

Taylor Urged the Use of Bloodhounds,

“Trained to the Work of Scenting an Indian or Negro”

 

140.   Stearns, Charles: FACTS IN THE LIFE OF GEN. TAYLOR; THE CUBA BLOOD-HOUND IMPORTER, THE EXTENSIVE SLAVE-HOLDER, AND THE HERO OF THE MEXICAN WAR. Boston: Published by the Author. [For Sale by Bela Marsh], 1848. 35, [1] pp. Stitched in original printed wrappers. Lightly spotted, mild wear, Good+.

 

     An anti-slavery Whig, Stearns was horrified that his Party had nominated Taylor, a Louisiana slave-holder, for the Presidency. Taylor compounded his sins as "a bold and prominent leader in that most infernal of all expeditions,- the Mexican War." Stearns hopes to create "an unflinching opposition to his election." During the Florida Wars, Taylor urged "that aid should be obtained from Cuba, in the shape of blood-hounds, who, trained to the work of scenting an Indian or Negro, would be able to penetrate the swamps where the poor fugitive was existing." Disgusted by everything Southern and smacking of Slavery, Stearns attacks Taylor's public and private character.

Miles 260. Wise & Cronin [Taylor] 117. As of February 2017 OCLC records only reproductions.                                                                                                            $500.00

 

“One of His Best Promotions”

 

141.   Strahorn, Robert E.: MONTANA AND YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. FACTS AND EXPERIENCES ON THE FARMING, STOCK RAISING, MINING, LUMBERING, AND OTHER INDUSTRIES OF MONTANA, AND NOTES ON THE CLIMATE, SCENERY, GAME, FISH AND MINERAL SPRINGS, WITH FULL AND RELIABLE DATA ON ROUTES, DISTANCES, RATES OF FARE, EXPENSES OF LIVING, WAGES, SCHOOL AND CHURCH PRIVILEGES, SOCIETY, MEANS OF ACQUIRING HOMES, AND OTHER VALUABLE AND RELIABLE INFORMATION, APPLICABLE TO THE WANTS OF THE CAPITALIST, HOMESEEKER, OR TOURIST. Kansas City: Ramsey, Millet & Hudson, 1881. 191 pp + [14] advertising pages, including the rear pastedown. Bound in original stiff brown paper wrappers, with title stamped in gilt on front cover. Wrappers with some discoloration. Text clean, some margin spotting, particularly the bottom margins of the first several leaves. Many full-page and in-text engraved illustrations. Ownership inscription on front pastedown: "Greenhood, Bohm & Co.| Virginia City| Montana," a large mercantile business owned by Isaac Greenhood, a Bavarian immigrant, and Ferdinand Bohm with offices in Montana and New York City. Good+.

 

     "Strahorn was one of the best writers of promotional pamphlets on the West, and this is one of his best promotions...” Reese, Six Score 104. This is the second edition; the 1879 printing was 80 pages. "Much enlarged and expanded as the new territory grew" [Eberstadt].  Strahorn has not only expanded the subjects that he treats, all noted in the title, but he has also provided more illustrative material as well. On the scarcity of women in the Territory, Strahorn notes that most of them don't stay single for long. "In fact, there are lots of bachelors in Montana and they are a terribly earnest set of fellows."

Howes S1057. 110 Eberstadt 192. 43 Decker 216. Adams Herd 2182.                     $1,750.00

 

142.   [Sugar Act]: OBSERVATIONS ON THE CASE OF THE NORTHERN COLONIES. London: Printed for J. Roberts, 1731. 31, [1 blank] pp. Scattered foxing [generally light], bound in modern decorative wrappers. Good+.

 

     Sabin calls the pamphlet "A vindication of the Sugar Act, then pending in Parliament. This act prohibited the northern colonies from trading for sugar, etc., with the French West Indies, and required them to obtain these articles from the British West Indies or from England."

     The anonymous author examines the economies and trading practices of the American colonies. Carefully analyzing their economies, their trade with the French West Indies, and the advantages that such trade confers upon the French enemy, he concludes that "the dispute is only with New England," although New York and Pennsylvania have been insufficiently helpful. Maryland, Virginia and the Carolinas have not interfered with England's trade in a manner "so injurious to their Mother Country." They "therefore have a Merit with their Mother Country, which New England, New York and Pensilvania can in no wise pretend to."   

Sabin 56510. Kress 3956. ESTC T10214.                                                                  $650.00

 

Vote for Greeley, Not Grant, to

“Save the Colored Race from Indignity”

 

143.   Sumner, Charles: INTEREST AND DUTY OF COLORED CITIZENS IN THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. LETTER TO COLORED CITIZENS... JULY 29, 1872. Washington: F. & J. Rives & Geo. A. Bailey, 1872. 8pp, folded folio sheet, uncut. Closed margin tear in blank outer margins [no loss], Very Good.

 

     Sumner, the Republican Party's leading anti-slavery and equal rights proponent, urges newly enfranchised Negroes to vote for Horace Greeley and his Liberal Republican Party, and to turn their backs on President Grant. He writes in response to a request for his counsel by "the undersigned citizens of color," who call Sumner "the purest and best friend of our race." He deplores Grant's insufficiently enthusiastic advocacy of Negro Rights: Grant has done little "in protecting colored people and in assuring peace at the South. Nobody can doubt that a small portion of the effort and earnest will... would have averted those Ku Klux outrages which we deplore." Sumner urges friends of Equal Rights to "save the colored race from indignity" by voting for Greeley.

FIRST EDITION. LCP 10014. Blockson 3117.                                                         $350.00

 

Northern “Aggression” Has Caused the Sectional Crisis

 

144.   Tennessee: PUBLIC ACTS OF THE STATE OF TENNESSEE, PASSED AT THE EXTRA SESSION 0F THE THIRTY-THIRD GENERAL ASSEMBLY, FOR THE YEAR  1861. Nashville, Tenn.: E.G. Eastman, Public Printers, 1861. viii, 127, [1 blank] pp. Later institutional cloth and old bookplate on front pastedown. Light rubberstamp on blank portion of title leaf, which is lightly dusted. Lacks free endpapers, else Very Good in later buckram. 

 

     This Confederate Imprint leads with Governor Harris's Message of January 7, 1861, denouncing the North's "systematic, wanton, and long continued agitation of the slavery question," and its "actual and threatened aggressions." Deeply resentful of attempts to exclude slavery from the Western Territories, which were "acquired by the blood and treasure of all the States," he employs his oratory to swing sentiment to the Confederacy. But Tennessee did not secede until June 1861, the last State to leave the Union. West Tennessee heavily favored secession; East Tennessee was equally opposed. It came down to Middle Tennessee, which voted to cast the State's lot with the Confederacy.

       The Acts include a referendum on calling a Convention "to consider the then existing relations between the government of the United States and the government and people of the State of Tennessee." Resolution 14 proposes a convention of the slaveholding States for the purpose of amending the U.S. Constitution to guarantee protection of slave property in the Territories, and to protect the security of slavery. The State's Militia Law is also printed.

Parrish & Willingham 4129 [1- CA State Lib.]. Allen 5345 [2- TU, TKL-Mc]. OCLC  10721116 [11] as of March 2017.                                                                            $275.00

 

An Anti-Slavery Leader Loses His Election Because He Supported

Popular Sovereignty

145.   [Thayer, Eli]: TWO SIDES TO THIS QUESTION. LEADING MEMBERS OF THE PRINCE'S PARTY REDUCED TO AN ABSURDITY. [Worcester, Mass.: 1860]. Uncolored, folio broadside lithograph, 14" x 18". Fine.

 

     This rare broadside demonstrates the anti-slavery movement's different responses to the Slave Power's growing influence. It rejoices in Eli Thayer's defeat in the 1860 Congressional elections. Before his loss he had been elected to Congress as a Republican in 1856 and 1858. A passionate anti-slavery man, founder of the New England Emigrant Aid Society, Thayer led the effort to populate Kansas with Free State men, and thus to prevent Kansas's entry into the Union as a Slave State. But he supported Popular Sovereignty, arguing that Free State proponents would prevail in democratically-conducted elections. "Eli Thayer in air over hornet's nest being appealed to by his followers. Referring to utter defeat of Thayer and his followers in 1860" [Weitenkampf]. Of Stephen A. Douglas, the champion of Popular Sovereignty, Thayer says here, "Douglas killed me by his laying on of hands & anointing me as Prince of Squatter Sovereignty & here I go to another sphere."

     In a February 1859 speech, Thayer denounced "political Cassandras" "who are continually saying that slavery has always had its own way, and always will have it; that slavery under the Dred Scott decision, will yet be established in Massachusetts and New Hampshire..." Those Cassandras-- who opposed slavery in the new territories under all circumstances-- included Abraham Lincoln and William Seward. Angry Republicans denied Thayer renomination in 1860; he ran as an independent and lost, despite having received the support of Democrats and Constitutional Unionists.

    AAS attributes this lithograph to Thomas Earle of Worcester. We have been unable to confirm the attribution. The only candidate we have located is a Thomas Earle [1823-1871], who owned a lumber yard, was a Massachusetts State Representative, and would serve as a Lieutenant during the Civil War.

Weitenkampf, page 120. OCLC 191120244 [1- AAS] as of March 2017. See, AAS Polit. Cart. T974 on line. Not located at the Library of Congress web site, or the web sites of Boston Athenaeum, Massachusetts Historical Society, Harvard.                                       $1,500.00

 

146.   [Thomas, Isaiah] [George, Daniel]: THOMAS'S MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, RHODE-ISLAND, NEWHAMPSHIRE & VERMONT ALMANACK, WITH AN EPHEMERIS, FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1791. Worcester: Isaiah Thomas, Sold by him in Worcester...and at the Boston Bookstore; and by other Booksellers in Boston, [1794]. [48] pp. Stitched. Blank outer margins wormed, light foxing. Woodcuts. Good+.

 

     "Nichols... says that the Thomas almanacs from 1791 to 1794 were calculated by Daniel George" [NAIP]. In addition to the usual, this Almanac prints an excerpt from Franklin's 'Way to Wealth,' an article on 'The Symptoms and Cure of the Vapours', a 'Table of Rates at which Dollars pass in the American States,' tables of interest, "A Table for Buying or Selling any Commodity by the Great Hundred, which is 112 Pounds,' and a table of roads and distances.

Evans 22537. Drake 3458. NAIP w029838.                                                              $350.00

 

147.   Thompson, Joseph P.: LEWDNESS AND MURDER. A DISCOURSE SUGGESTED BY THE LATE MURDER; DELIVERED IN THE CHAPEL STREET CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, ON SABBATH EVENING, MARCH 9TH, 1845; ALSO REPEATED IN THE CENTER CHURCHES OF NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD. New Haven: J.H. Benham, 1845. 24pp, disbound with light to moderate foxing. Good+.

 

     This is the first of four editions published in 1845. "Rather than returning a watch Andrew Potter had borrowed from Lucius P. Osborn, Potter chose to kill him and keep the watch. He was convicted and hanged" [Cohen]. The Discourse is "on the murder of Lucius P. Osborne by Andrew P. Potter. Much of Thompson's sermon concerns the vice of lewdness, which, in his view, directly led to this murder. Some details of the crime are given" [Id.].

FIRST EDITION. Cohen 12929. AI 45-6350 [4]. McDade 763-766 [reference].     $150.00

 

The Ancestor of America’s Underground Comics

 

148.   Tijuana Bibles: A COLLECTION OF EIGHT TIJUANA BIBLES. [np: @1930s]. Each 3" x 4", stapled as issued, 8pp, with original printed and illustrated wrappers [two wrappers worn, one with edge loss]. Occasional light wear, overall Very Good. This collection offers 'Arthur Treacher in Breakfast in Bed,' 'Patsy Kelly Gets Shot in the Ass With Romance,' 'Stella Clinker in Too Weak,' 'Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck in He's A Man,' 'Katherine Hepburn in Belle of the Hills,' 'Diddle Daley Presents the Katzenjammers in Shipwrecked,' and other interesting titles. The characters energetically engage in various illustrated forms of indiscreet behavior.

 

     Tijuana Bibles "were produced by a shadowy criminal underground in the 1930s. Very little hard information is available about how the Bibles were created, where they were manufactured, and how they were distributed. One certain fact, confirmed by numerous anecdotes, is that these comic books were for many young men their first peek into the forbidden world of erotic intimacy" [Adelman].

     Crudely printed and illustrated porn tract-comic books, the skimpy stories featured contemporary movie, sports, folk, political and cartoon characters in absurdly hyperbolic sexual relations. Why they're called Tijuana Bibles is a matter of speculation; 'Tijuana' was typically associated with iniquity and as an outlet for behavior considered impermissible elsewhere. Properly considered the ancestor of America's underground comics, Tijuana Bibles declined in popularity in the 1960's as mainstream publications like Playboy would satisfy readers' prurient interests.

Adelman, Tijuana Bibles. Art and Wit in America's Forbidden Funnies. 1930s-1950s. [1997].

                                                                                                                                    $650.00

 

149.   Troubat, Francis J.; Haly, William W.: NOTES ON PRACTICE, EXHIBITING A VIEW OF THE PROCEEDINGS IN CIVIL ACTIONS, IN THE SUPREME COURT OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND IN THE DISTRICT COURT, AND COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OF PHILADELPHIA. Philadelphia: Robert Desilver. 1825. xii, [3]-369 pp. Original calf [light rubbing and wear], gilt lettered red morocco spine label [leather at head of spine beginning to lift]. Scattered foxing, text tanned, several pages a bit darkened. Pastedowns and endpapers browned. Ownership signature, 'Geo. A. Elliot' on front endpaper. Small newspaper clipping from N.Y. Sunday Times, "Legal Responsibility of Fathers," laid down on front pastedown. Very Good.

 

     The preface states: "As the title page of this work promises a view of the practice in the Common Pleas of this county, we shall avail ourselves of this opportunity to state in what degree this has not been performed. Much of its practice and jurisdiction remains to be considered under the head of Proceedings by and against Particular Persons; as in the cases of idiots; lunatics; habitual drunkards; in proceedings against assignees; aldermen; justices of the peace; and constables..." A second volume issued in 1829.

Cohen 9197.                                                                                                                $150.00

 

Georgia Democrat Denounces Know-Nothings for

Religious Intolerance and “Pandering to the Abolition Influence”

 

150.   Turner, J.A.: A LETTER TO HON. N.G. FOSTER, CANDIDATE FOR CONGRESS IN THE 7TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT OF GA. IN REPLY TO A SPEECH DELIVERED BY HIM AGAINST THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY, AND IN FAVOR OF THE DOCTRINES OF THE KNOW-NOTHINGS, IN EATONTON, ON THURSDAY, 16TH AUGUST, 1855. Milledgeville, Ga.: Federal Union Power Press, 1855. Original printed wrappers with wrapper title and caption title [as issued]. Stitched. 39, [1 blank] pp. Some wrapper darkening, spine wrapper shorn. Text lightly to moderately foxed, Good+.

 

     A loyal Southern Democrat, Turner tells Foster "that your doctrines involve a war upon the principles of the Declaration of Independence, of the State and Federal Constitutions, of a republican form of government, and therefore of civil and religious liberty." The Know-Nothings oppose "religious toleration," which is "the corner stone of our political edifice. You can't destroy that without pulling down the whole superstructure." He defends the loyalty of American Catholics and denounces Know-Nothings for attempting to limit their civic participation.

     Turner says, "The Democratic party has administered this government for nearly half a century. Under this administration a great Empire has sprung up, almost as if by magic." He charges Foster's Party with "pandering to the abolition influence at the North" and for favoring Congressional power to restrict slavery in the Western Territories. 

Not in De Renne. OCLC 191315602 [11] as of March 2017.                                    $600.00

 

“The World is Trying Hard to Persuade Us That a Slaveholding People

Cannot be a People of High Moral and Intellectual Culture”

 

151.   [University of the South]: ADDRESS OF THE COMMISSIONERS FOR RAISING THE ENDOWMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH. New Orleans: B.M. Norman, Publisher, 1859. Original printed wrappers [moderately foxed], stitched, 16pp. Widely scattered light text foxing. Good+.

 

     The pamphlet recounts the history of efforts to establish the University. "The Southern States have not been indifferent to the subject of Collegiate education. Each of these States, at a very early period of its history, has founded an University, upon which it was intended to concentrate the patronage of the State Legislature. Could this policy have been adhered to steadily, free from the interference of popular clamor, or religious differences, the University which we are now proposing to establish might have been unnecessary... The South needs, more than ever, men of the very highest education, who shall prove that our institutions are not adverse to the loftiest culture... The world is trying hard to persuade us that a slaveholding people cannot be a people of high moral and intellectual culture."

     The triumvirate of Bishops Otey, Leonidas Polk, and Elliott led the effort, with a Board of Trustees consisting of the Bishops of eleven southern States [not Virginia or Kentucky]. This document prints the Trustees' Declaration of Principles, placing the University "under the sole and perpetual direction of the Protestant Episcopal Church." Pages 15-16 print the Act to Establish the University of the South, enacted by the Tennessee Legislature in 1858.

Jumonville 2882. De Renne 605.                                                                               $375.00

 

“The Most Meritorious of the Campaign Lives of 1860”

 

152.   Washburne, E[lihu] B[enjamin]: ABRAHAM LINCOLN, HIS PERSONAL HISTORY AND PUBLIC RECORD. SPEECH... OF ILLINOIS DELIVERED IN THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, MAY 29, 1860 [np: Published by the Republican Congressional Committee. 1860]. 8pp, disbound. Printed in double columns. Just a few light fox spots in the margins. Very Good. 

 

     "This, in subject matter the most meritorious of the campaign lives of 1860, was drawn partly from the Chicago Press and Tribune article, but principally from the author's own intimate knowledge of Lincoln's career" [Wessen].

     Washburne was "a warm friend of Lincoln, and a shrewd politician and seasoned political orator," whose speech is "biographical in character, and sold as a campaign document." Id. "The Illinois Congressman-- who had known Lincoln since 1840-- delivered this biographical address only two weeks after the convention" [Eberstadt]. Washburne says, "I have known him in private life, I have known him at the bar, and have been associated with him in every political contest in our State since the advent of 'Tippecanoe and Tyler too,' in 1840." This item also prints the Republican platform, adopted May 17, 1860.

FIRST EDITION Wessen, Campaign Lives of Abraham Lincoln 4. Miles 421. Monaghan 87. 165 Eberstadt 445. LCP 10962.                                                                                 $750.00

 

A Plea for Funds to Construct the Washington Monument

 

153.   [Washington Monument]: THE WASHINGTON NATIONAL MONUMENT, IN THE CITY OF WASHINGTON. BASE OF THE PANTHEON, 250 FEET DIAMETER. HEIGHT, 100 FEET. HEIGHT OF OBELISK, 500 FEET. THE LOFTIEST MONUMENT ON EARTH TO A NATION'S GREAT BENEFACTOR. THE TRIBUTE OF A GRATEFUL PEOPLE TO "THE FATHER OF HIS COUNTRY." Philadelphia: C. Sherman, Printer, [1840s]. 10" x 7-1/2". "Rob. Mills, Arch't. J. Sartain, Del't." Beneath the image of the Monument, in facsimile script: "Earnestly recommended to the favour of our countrymen," with facsimile signatures of James K. Polk, John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, Albert Gallatin, Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Daniel Webster." At the bottom, signed in ink "Wm. Dougherty" as Agent, is a place for noting the dollar amount "contributed to the erection of this Monument." Top margin trimmed closely, but image unaffected. Else Very Good.

 

    This print was a fundraiser for construction of the Washington Monument. It was engraved by William Gibon and printed by Sherman in Philadelphia. The artist was John Sartain.

OCLC 960915634 [1- AAS] as of February 2017.                                                    $375.00

 

154.   [Webb, Thomas H.]: ORGANIZATION, OBJECTS, AND PLAN OF OPERATIONS, OF THE EMIGRANT AID COMPANY: ALSO A DESCRIPTION OF KANSAS. FOR THE INFORMATION OF EMIGRANTS. FOURTH EDITION, WITH ADDITIONS. Boston: Alfred Mudge & Son, 1854. 24pp. Bound into contemporary marbled boards and lightly worn. Manuscript note at head of title: "Nov. 25, 1854. Gift of Thos. H. Webb." Good+.

 

     "The Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company was one of a number of organizations formed in the New England states to foster settlement of the newly organized Kansas Territory by northerners who would be opposed to slavery and would vote to exclude that 'Peculiar Institution' from the proposed state constitution" [Wagner-Camp]. Pages 9-18, plus the first three lines of page 19, print George Park's "Notes of a Trip Up Kanzas River, Including Observations on the Soil, Climate, Scenery, &c." The Company offers a fifty dollar prize for the "Best Song for Kanzas Emigrants." Webb was the Organization's Secretary.

Howes W192. Graff 4563. Wagner-Camp 240c [noting the first through third editions, all printed in 1854]. Sabin 22474. Dary 5.                                                              $450.00

 

155.   [West End Academy]: ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEST END ACADEMY WITH THE SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. WEST END, ATLANTA, GA. JUNE 25, 1886. A THOROUGH GRADED SCHOOL FOR BOYS AND GIRLS. [Atlanta: 1886]. 18pp. Original printed yellow wrappers [dustsoiled, top half of rear wrap missing], stitched. Top half of final page tanned. Printed name J. C. Harris (Joel Chandler Harris) appears on the list of Board of Trustees and also on the Treasurer's Report. Good+.

 

     "Any white child" over the age of six years is eligible for admission. A detailed curriculum is printed, with a list of students who received honors and the several graduates of the school's first graduating class.                                                                               $150.00

 

156.   Western Wheel Works: CRESCENT BICYCLES. [Chicago? 1897]. [48]pp, in original printed wrappers, with raised lettering and decorations. Glossy paper. Near Fine, with dozens of beautiful engravings.

 

     An extremely attractive trade catalogue, advertising the 1897 models. "No better bicycle can be made than that produced by the Western Wheel Works." The various models are depicted and priced.

OCLC 39624355 [3- Harvard, Chicago Hist. Mus., U TX] as of March 2017.         $375.00

 

Rare Whig Campaign Pamphlet

 

157.   [Whig Party in Massachusetts]: ADDRESS OF THE DISTRICT COMMITTEE TO THE WHIGS OF DISTRICT NO. 4. [Boston: 1849]. 4pp. Caption title, as issued. Folded to 8vo. Signed in type by five members of the Committee. Light soil, else Very Good.

 

     The District Committee, headed by John Sargent, urges Whigs to stick together: many Northern Whigs were disappointed by Zachary Taylor's nomination and election. Taylor, a political cypher, was a renowned military leader and Louisiana plantation owner. In particular, the Committee urges Whigs of District No. 4 to support the regular Whig Party candidate for Congress, Benjamin Thompson, against his opponent, John Palfrey, who has "abandoned the party, and... allied himself with your bitterest opponents." Palfrey had become a "Conscience Whig," i.e., an anti-slavery man, and then a candidate of the anti-slavery Free Soil Party.

Not located on OCLC as of March 2017. Not in Sabin.                                             $150.00

 

158.   Whitney, J.D., State Geologist, Geological Survey of California: THE YOSEMITE GUIDE-BOOK: A DESCRIPTION OF THE YOSEMITE VALLEY AND THE ADJACENT REGION OF THE SIERRA NEVADA, AND OF THE BIG TREES OF CALIFORNIA. NEW EDITION, REVISED AND CORRECTED. WITH FOUR MAPS. [Cambridge: University Press], 1874. 186pp, plus four maps [three of them folding, one a single page] as issued. Without the pocket on the rear pastedown. Clean text. Bound in original publisher's decorated green cloth, all edges gilt. Light scuffing to the binding, inner hinges cracked, occasional mild fold wear to a folding map, else Very Good.

 

     In 1864 the United States conveyed Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees to the State of California. Whitney led the surveying party, whose members included Clarence King. The first edition of this book, only 250 copies, issued in 1868; in 1869 a second edition of 155 pages was published.

     A folding color map shows mid-California from San Francisco to Yosemite and Mono Lake [dated 1872]; there is a large folding map of the Sierra Nevada adjacent to the Yosemite Valley; another folding map and a single-page sketch of the Hetch-Hetchy Valley. Two of the maps were revised for this edition, and the "Sketch of the Hetch-Hetchy Valley" was new.

Howes W389. Cowan 699. Farquhar 7b. 36 Decker 58.                                            $1,000.00

 

159.   [Wisconsin]: EIGHTEEN LARGE PATENT MAPS OF LAFAYETTE COUNTY, WISCONSIN, ALL IN INK MANUSCRIPT, WITH TWENTY FOLIO PAGES OF NEATLY HANDWRITTEN SURVEY RECORDS TO ACCOMPANY THE MAPS. [Lafayette County, Wisconsin: 1860s?]. Large folio book [worn, half-sheep]. "FIELD NOTES" stamped in black ink on front board; textblock separated from binding. [20] pages of manuscript survey records on preprinted lined paper with three columns per page, followed by [18] blank pages. With 18 corresponding patent maps. Maps held at head by two metal clasps, all in ink manuscript prepared on preprinted graph paper labeled at bottom "Form 21" and sold by H. Niedecken & Co. of Milwaukee. Each map labeled as 'County of Lafayette' with the town and range numbers. All writing neat and legible. Tanned, scattered foxing. Very Good.

 

     The 18 patent maps include County of LaFayette, Township One, Ranges 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Township Two, Ranges 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Township Three, Ranges 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Township Four, Ranges 1, 3 & 4 [combined], 5. La Fayette County was founded in 1846.                        $350.00

 

160.   XYZ Affair: MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, ACCOMPANYING A REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE, CONTAINING OBSERVATIONS ON SOME OF THE DOCUMENTS, COMMUNICATED BY THE PRESIDENT, ON THE EIGHTEENTH JANUARY 1799. [Philadelphia: 1799]. 16pp, caption title [as issued]. Disbound. Some extremity chipping and wear, text unaffected. Good+.

 

     Secretary of State Pickering, no Francophile, details attempts of the French government "to exculpate itself from the charge of corruption, as having demanded a douceur of Fifty Thousand Pounds sterling (222,000 dollars) for the pockets of the Directors and Ministers..." Much on the XYZ affair is reviewed. Evans explains, "This is not the official printing but a pamphlet made by repaging a newspaper printing of the message." For the official printing, see

Evans 36548. NAIP w026013 [6]. Evans 36546 for the official printing.                 $450.00