ABAA ILAB

|   Home   |   Contact   |   Catalogs   |   Upcoming Fairs   |   Principal References   |   New Arrivals   |   Checkout   |  

Daggett, David:

MR. DAGGETT'S ARGUMENT, BEFORE THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER, 1804, IN THE CASE OF CERTAIN JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. TO WHICH IS PREFIXED, A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASSEMBLY.

New-Haven: 1804 30pp, loose. Spine edges a bit chewed [no text affected], tanned, scattered foxing. Good. An illuminating early dispute on the nature and function of a Constitution. William Judd and other citizens of a Jeffersonian persuasion, some of whom were justices of the peace, issued an Address at New Haven declaring that Connecticut lacked a valid Constitution because, although the Legislature had adopted it, the people had not voted on it. "In October, 1804, Connecticut's Federalist-controlled legislature summoned the five justices who had attended the New Haven meeting and asked them to show cause why their commissions should not be revoked, since they had openly attacked a constitution they were sworn to uphold. This pamphlet contains Daggett's argument for the prosecution. To ascertain if the state had a binding constitution, he premised, one need only determine if the people had ever voluntarily assented to their form of government. Connecticut's history proved that the state indeed had such a constitution. The commissions of all five justices were revoked." Sheidley. One of Connecticut's more prolific Federalists, Daggett published a number of pamphlets, "all of considerable literary merit." DAB. FIRST EDITION. Sheidley 143. Sabin 18262. AI 6110 [6].


Book Id: 10469

Price: $100.00

privacy policy | security | Site Map | Site by Bibliopolis