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New York:

STRICTURES ON GOVERNOR SEYMOUR'S VETO OF THE BILL FOR THE SUPPRESSION OF INTEMPERANCE, PASSED IN THE SENATE OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK, MARCH 11, 1854, BY A VOTE OF 21 TO 11; AND IN THE ASSEMBLY ON THE 22D, BY A VOTE OF 84 TO 42.

American Temperance Union, New-York: 1854 1854. 16pp, stitched. Light tan and wear, old rubberstamp number, Good+. Despite his "known character as a high-minded, honorable man" Governor Seymour vetoed a bill that would prohibit the sale of intoxicating liquors. Seymour's argument that the bill constitutes an excessive governmental intrusion into private lives is nonsense: the traffic in liquor causes "murders, and robberies, and riots," and other social evils; moreover, a State has constitutional power to regulate "its own internal traffic," as the U.S. Supreme Court has said. "Friends of temperance! We have a great conflict before us. We have fought long, and we have fought well...The rotten license system can not stand." The good guys will win, eventually, although "the rum interest is a mighty power." Sabin 92840. Not in Eberstadt, Decker, BEAL.


Book Id: 11905

Price: $150.00

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