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[Memminger, C.G.]:

STATEMENT OF THE CAUSES THAT LED TO THE WITHDRAWAL OF THE DEPUTIES FROM THE LATE DIOCESAN CONVENTION OF SOUTH CAROLINA.

Charleston: 1887 59, [1 blank] pp. Stitched, lacks wrappers. Light toning, light dampstaining in bottom margin of all leaves. Else Very Good. An important pamphlet on the post-Civil War struggle over integration of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the South. St. Mark's Church (Colored) sought admission to the Diocesan Convention in 1875; a bitter dispute erupted, was tabled, and then revived in 1880, "by the application of Thaddaeus Saltus, a colored person, for admission to the order of Deacon." The Convention of 1887 declared itself ready to conduct business, with a colored clergyman seated at the Convention. Memminger, a South Carolinian who before the War had been a secessionist and pro-slavery man, argues that "the seating of colored clergymen in our Conventions is not only unconstitutional but in itself dangerous in the extreme." With his allies, he withdrew in protest. OCLC records a number of institutional locations. Not in Turnbull.


Book Id: 1244

Price: $150.00

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