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Phillips, Wendell:

WENDELL PHILLIPS, ESQ. ON A METROPOLITAN POLICE. PHONOGRAPHICALLY REPORTED FOR THE BOSTON TRAVELLER, BY J.M.W. YERRINTON.

[Boston: 1863] 16mo. 32pp. Caption title [as issued]. A bit of dusting, else Very Good. Basing his arguments on the experience of London and New York, Phillips argues that a large metropolitan area like Boston cannot rely on town constables, answerable to the Mayor and Alderman, to execute the laws. Phillips has contempt for Boston's elected officials: "No man with a full measure of self-respect could accept such an office." Prevailing intemperance in the use of liquors, despite legal prohibitions, is his prime example of failure to enforce existing laws. "National prosperity and institutions have put into the hands of almost every workman the means of being drunk for a week on the labor of two or three hours. A drunken people can never be the basis of a free government." Phillips bitterly recalls the support that local police gave to slave-owners, in returning fugitives who had fled to Massachusetts seeking their freedom. He concludes that power over police must be taken out of local hands and placed in the State. FIRST EDITION. Sabin 62528n. Not in Harv. Law Cat., Marke, Eberstadt, Decker.


Book Id: 19321

Price: $350.00

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