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[Stein, Albert]:

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF ALABAMA. JUNE TERM, 1856. ALBERT STEIN... VERSUS JUDAH TOURO ROBERTSON. APPEAL FROM THE COURT OF CHANCERY, MOBILE.

J.Y. Thompson, Mobile [AL]: 1856 [Caption title: BRIEF IN BEHALF OF APPELLEE]. 28pp + blank interleaves, stitched into later marbled wrappers [chipped at outer forecorner]. Scattered foxing, Good+. In 1840 the City of Mobile conveyed to Stein, a hydraulics engineer, a franchise to supply the City with water; the Alabama legislature confirmed this grant. Stein's water system operated as a private company until 1898, long after he died in 1874. In this suit, the Robertson family asserted an interest with Stein in the Company, claiming "the benefit of property and money received and invested by Albert Stein, in the Mobile Water Works." W.H. Robertson, they allege, had invested with the Water Works "all the funds of his children." Though title remained in Stein's name, part ownership resided in the Robertsons. "Robertson conceived the plan of the Mobile Water Works to be feasible, and laid the foundation for the enterprise. Robertson and Stein were to be equally interested in the enterprise. The contracts, and the property of the concern, were placed, and allowed to remain, in the name of Stein, for the better management thereof..." In Stein vs. Robertson, 30 Ala. 286 [1858], the Alabama Supreme Court upheld Robertson's claims and awarded him an equal interest in the Mobile Water Works. Albert Stein [1785-1874] was born in Dusseldorf, Prussia, and served as a hydraulic engineer in Napoleon's army during the French Revolution; it is said he was also Napoleon's chess partner. Stein emigrated to Philadelphia in 1816. He moved around the country and designed Cincinnati's first municipal water works; widened part of the Appomattox River in Virginia to improve shipping; served as a water works engineer for Lynchburg; designed and built the country's first water filtration system in Richmond; designed and built water works in Nashville; consulted on a system for New York City; and finally moved to Alabama where he bought a water works company and became focused on engineering ideas for the Mississippi River. Judah Touro Robertson [1842-1900] sued in this case as an infant by his guardian. As an adult, Robertson served in Company D, 12th New York State Militia, during the Civil War, and became Vice President of the American Bank Note Company. He also filed patents late in life for improvements to be made upon steam plate printing presses. Not in Ellison, Owen, Sabin, Harv. Law Cat., Marke, Cohen, or on OCLC as of August 2014.


Book Id: 21842

Price: $450.00

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