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Wedgwood, Josiah:
WEDGWOOD TILE OF THE SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' MONUMENT IN BOSTON WITH THE INSCRIPTION TAKEN FROM THE MONUMENT ITSELF.
Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, [Boston:, c 1883]
6" x 6", ceramic tile with brown sepia transfer depicting the renowned Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument on Boston Common, commemorating the defenders of the Union in the Civil War. Depictinglines of trees on either side of the monument and printing the full inscription from the monument. On the back of the tile is the raised imprint "JOSIAH WEDGWOOD & SONS ETRURIA." Light wear around the edges, with little wear to the transfer itself. Very Good.

Price: $75.00
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Hall, A. Oakey:
HORACE GREELEY DECENTLY DISSECTED, IN A LETTER ON HORACE GREELEY, ADDRESSED BY A. OAKEY HALL TO JOSEPH HOXIE, ESQ., REPUBLISHED (WITH AN ALPHABET OF NOTES) BY POPULAR REQUEST.
Ross & Tousey, New York:, 1862
38pp, disbound, a few fox marks. Good+. A thorough and detailed attack on Greeley's political positions, particularly his view that the 'erring sister' slave states should be permitted to depart from the Union in peace. Sabin 29712.

Price: $75.00
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[Davis, Jefferson]:
WHAT JEFF. DAVIS THINKS OF THE WAR.
National Union Executive Committee, [New York:, 1864]
Broadside, 9" x 11 1/2", printed in two columns. Old folds, a bit of foxing, Very Good. A rare broadside, demonstrating Jefferson Davis's affinity with the Democratic Party, expressed at its Chicago convention. "The main plank of the Chicago Platform is that which pronounces the war a FAILURE, and on that account demands that 'IMMEDIATE EFFORTS BE MADE FOR A CESSATION OF HOSTILITIES'." Eberstadt calls this a "scarce piece denouncing the Chicago plank, and airing Davis' views as expressed at Macon, Montgomery, and Richmond. The effectual way to end the war and restore the Union is: VOTE FOR LINCOLN." FIRST EDITION. 133 Eberstadt 281. OCLC locates seven copies under several accession numbers as of April 2017.

Price: $750.00
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[Civil War]:
ARMS OF YE CONFEDERACIE.
G. H. Heap Inv., [Philadelphia?]:, [1862?]
Engraving on off-white card, 4-3/4" x 4". "G.H. Heap Inv. H.H. Tilley Del. et Sc." Very Good. "A small card bearing a vitriolic indictment of the Confederacy. The artist particularly attacks the institution of slavery... A large shield is flanked by two figures: a planter (left) and a slave. The planter wears spurs and a broad-brimmed hat and smokes a cigar. The slave is clad only in breeches, and his hands are manacled. Above the shield are two crossed flags, the Confederate flag and one bearing a skull and crossbones and the number 290. Between the flags are a rooster and a streamer with the motto 'servitudo esto perpetua.' On the shield are images associated with the South: a mint julep, a bottle of 'Old Rye,' a pistol and dagger, a whip and manacles, cotton, tobacco, and sugar plants, and slaves hoeing. In the background left, dominated by the palmetto tree of South Carolina, three planters, one holding a whip, play cards at a table. Beyond, two men duel with pistols. On the right, a female slave is auctioned as two slave children stand by. A black woman watches from a cabin doorway" [Reilly]. Reilly 1862-13. OCLC records five locations under three accession numbers [Penn. State, U So. Car., Lib. Cong., MA Hist., W Res. Hist. Soc.] as of April 2017.

Price: $1,000.00
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Drew, Charles:
THE ROLE OF SOVIET INVESTIGATORS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BLOOD BANK. [IN] AMERICAN REVIEW OF SOVIET MEDICINE, APRIL 1944.
Published by the American-Soviet Medical Society, New York:, 1944
Drew's article occupies pages 360-369 of the April 1944 issue. We offer the entire Volume I, consisting of four issues totaling 588 pages. Portraits, illustrations, charts, bound in original large 8vo red cloth, gilt spine title lettering. Very Good. This is the article's first appearance by the father of the American and British blood banks of World War II. Drew became the first African-American to receive a Doctor of Science degree, which he earned for his thesis, written at Columbia, on blood banks. Drew's article acknowledges the early Soviet work in the preservation of blood.

Price: $750.00
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Belisario, A.M.:
A REPORT OF THE TRIAL OF ARTHUR HODGE, ESQUIRE, (LATE ONE OF THE MEMBERS OF HIS MAJESTY'S COUNCIL FOR THE VIRGIN-ISLANDS) AT THE ISLAND OF TORTOLA, ON THE 25TH APRIL, 1811, AND ADJOURNED TO THE 29TH OF THE SAME MONTH; FOR THE MURDER OF HIS NEGRO MAN SLAVE NAMED PROSPER. STENOGRAPHICALLY TAKEN BY A.M. BELISARIO, ESQUIRE, ONE OF THE GRAND JURY WHO FOUND THE BILL OF INDICTMENT; AND CERTIFIED TO BE IMPARTIAL AND CORRECT BY HIS HONOR RICHARD HETHERINGTON, ESQ. PRESIDENT OF THE VIRGIN-ISLANDS, AND PRESIDENT OF THE COURT ON THIS TRIAL.
Tertius Dunning, Middletown [CT]:, 1812
Contemporary paper-covered boards [rebacked in period style]. [2], 186 pp. Untrimmed, occasional toning and mild foxing. Very Good. A rare printing of a judicial rarity: the trial of a master for murdering his slave. American Imprints, locating only one copy [Fisk University], suggests incorrectly that Middletown Tennessee, was the printing site. Hodge's brutality was too much even for the slave province of Tortola: the jury sentenced him to hang because Hodge, after having flogged Prosper for two days, left him to die a painful death-- without food or medical aid-- over the next week and a half. This case was extraordinary for several reasons, not least that "the chief prosecution witness was a free black woman. In the slave states (and some of the free states) it was illegal for a black to testify against a white" [Finkelman 291]. The evidence demonstrated Hodge's notoriously cruel treatment of his slaves. For Hodge's lawyers to assert "that a negro, being property, it was no greater offence in law for his owner to kill him, than it would be to kill his dog" [page 77], was surely a major tactical error. Hodge was hanged; the case apparently contributed to the abolition of slavery in the British West Indies. FIRST EDITION. Finkelman 290. II Harv. Law Cat. 1103. AI 24790 [1]. OCLC locates seven copies as of April 2017 under several accession numbers. LCP Supp. 1080. Cohen 12700.

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Riddle, A[lbert] G[allatin]:
CLOSING ARGUMENT OF THE HON. A.G. RIDDLE, FOR THE PROSECUTION, AT THE TRIAL OF HIRAM C. WHITLEY, RICHARD HARRINGTON, AND ARTHUR B. WILLIAMS, FOR CONSPIRACY, IN THE CRIMINAL COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, NOVEMBER 23, 24, AND 25, 1874.
Government Printing Office, Washington:, 1874
Original printed wrappers, 214pp. Wraps chipped at the extremities. Very Good. Riddle represented the United States in a complicated, bizarre case involving the theft of documents from a vault in the office of the Washington, D.C. District Attorney. Those indicted included the Chief, Assistant Chief, and a clerk of the U.S. Secret Service; an assistant U.S. attorney; and a prominent Washington criminal lawyer. The purpose of the theft was to obtain documents for use in an investigation. The case received great attention for "the revelations of the inside history of the District government, for its novelty, and from the curious tissue of circumstantial evidence developed at the trial..." 9 American Law Review 351 [1875]. FIRST EDITION. II Harv. Law Cat. 468.

Price: $275.00
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Hamlin, Hannibal:
SPEECH OF HON. HANNIBAL HAMLIN, OF MAINE, IN THE UNITED STATES SENATE, MARCH 9 AND 10, 1858, IN REPLY TO GOVERNOR HAMMOND, AND IN DEFENCE OF THE NORTH AND NORTHERN LABORERS.
16pp. Caption title [as issued], printed in double columns, disbound. Light scattered foxing. Very Good. Lincoln's Vice Presidential running mate opposes Southern attempts to take Kansas into the ranks of slave states by fraud.

Price: $35.00
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[Rhode Island]:
AT A GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF RHODE-ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, JUNE 18, A.D. 1796. THE UNDERWRITTEN REPRESENTATIVES DISSENT FROM THE BILL FOR ESTABLISHING AN ESTIMATE OF THE VALUE OF RATEABLE PROPERTY IN THE SEVERAL TOWNS IN THIS STATE...
Printed by G. Wheeler, [Providence]:, [1796]
Broadside, 7-5/8" x 12-7/8". Light uniform toning, old folds, Very Good. This rare broadside objects to the General Assembly's "arbitrary and capricious" assessments, particularly for Providence and Bristol Counties. Providence is "estimated at more than double the Town of Newport." It is signed in type by fifteen Representatives, headed by Welcome Arnold. Also printed is a unanimous Resolution of the Providence Town Meeting held on June 23, 1796: "That no Assessment of this Town's Apportionment of the State Tax, as ordered by the General Assembly, at their June Session, shall be made by the Assessors of this Town; such Apportionment being manifestly unconstitutional." Beneath that is another Vote of the Providence Town Meeting to publicize the foregoing Protests. "A minority report of representatives dissenting from a recently enacted tax law; signed by Welcome Arnold and fourteen others. Followed by attested records of town meetings held in Providence June 23 and 29, 1796, declaring the act was unconstitutional" [NAIP]. Evans 31095. Alden 1491. NAIP w010487 [4].

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[Bunker Hill]:
BOSTON, 26TH OF JUNE, 1775. THIS TOWN WAS ALARMED ON THE 17TH INSTANT AT BREAK OF DAY, BY A FIRING FROM THE LIVELY SHIP OF WAR; AND A REPORT WAS IMMEDIATELY SPREAD THAT THE REBELS HAD BROKEN GROUND, AND WERE RAISING A BATTERY ON THE HEIGHTS OF THE PENINSULA OF CHARLESTOWN, AGAINST THE TOWN OF BOSTON...
Printed by John Howe, [Boston:, 1775]
Folio broadside, 36cm x 22cm. Thomas W. Streeter's copy, with his small sticker on the blank verso. Near Fine. "British account of the battle of Bunker Hill" [ESTC]. The printer, John Howe [1754-1835], was a Loyalist; he witnessed the Battle and wrote this scarce broadside. Recording the responses of British Generals Howe and Pigot as American troops amassed, he describes the heroic British assault on the American left flank: "notwithstanding various Impediments of Fences, Walls, &c. and the heavy Fire they were exposed to, from the vast Numbers of Rebels, and their Left galled from the Houses of Charlestown, the Troops made their Way to the Redoubt, mounted the Works, and carried it. The Rebels were then forced from other strong Holds, and pursued 'till they were drove clear of the Peninsula, leaving Five Pieces of Cannon behind them." "This Action has shown the Bravery of the King's Troops, who under every Disadvantage, gained a compleat Victory over Three Times their Number, strongly posted, and covered by Breastworks. But they fought for their KING, their LAWS and CONSTITUTION." Evans 13842. ESTC W9549. Streeter Sale 760, with illustration at page 563.

Price: $20,000.00
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Turner, J.A.:
A LETTER TO HON. N.G. FOSTER, CANDIDATE FOR CONGRESS IN THE 7TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT OF GA. IN REPLY TO A SPEECH DELIVERED BY HIM AGAINST THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY, AND IN FAVOR OF THE DOCTRINES OF THE KNOW-NOTHINGS, IN EATONTON, ON THURSDAY, 16TH AUGUST, 1855.
Federal Union Power Press, Milledgeville, Ga.:, 1855
Original printed wrappers with wrapper title and caption title [as issued]. Stitched. 39, [1 blank] pp. Some wrapper darkening, spine wrapper shorn. Text lightly to moderately foxed, Good+. A loyal Southern Democrat, Turner tells Foster "that your doctrines involve a war upon the principles of the Declaration of Independence, of the State and Federal Constitutions, of a republican form of government, and therefore of civil and religious liberty." The Know-Nothings oppose "religious toleration," which is "the corner stone of our political edifice. You can't destroy that without pulling down the whole superstructure." He defends the loyalty of American Catholics and denounces the Know-Nothings for attempting to limit their participation in American civic life. Turner says, "The Democratic party has administered this government for nearly half a century. Under this administration a great Empire has sprung up, almost as if by magic." He charges Foster's Party with "pandering to the abolition influence at the North" and for favoring Congressional power to restrict slavery in the Western Territories. Not in De Renne. OCLC 191315602 [11] as of March 2017.

Price: $600.00
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Lamar, John B. et al.:
ADDRESS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL UNION PARTY OF GEORGIA [and] ADDRESS OF A PORTION OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE TO THE UNION DEMOCRACY AND UNION WHIGS, FRIENDS OF PIERCE AND KING.
[4] pp, printed on rectos only. Folio sheet, folded to 8-1/4" x 10-1/4". Old folds, Very Good plus. Printed on blue paper, and signed at the end in type. The Constitutional Union Party announces [prematurely, as things turned out] "the complete triumph of their principles... in favor of the finality of the Compromise" of 1850. Lamar and his fellow Executive Committee members conclude that the Party should now dissolve and withdraw its electoral ticket, in order "to secure the vote of Georgia to Pierce and King," the Democratic presidential ticket. Because the Whig Party is reorganizing in Georgia, the Executive Committee urges solidarity with "those Union Whigs who stand identified with us in the support of the National Democratic Nominees." The Committee consisted of Lamar, B.H. Hill, Arthur Hood, Noel B. Knight, E.H. Pottle, John W. Owens, and George W. Thomas. Hill and Thomas did not sign the second Address. FIRST EDITION. De Renne 545. OCLC 5105225 [4- Emory, Duke, U GA, GA Hist. Soc.] as of March 2017. Not in Hummel.

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Asplund, John:
THE ANNUAL REGISTER OF THE BAPTIST DENOMINATION, IN NORTH-AMERICA; TO THE FIRST OF NOVEMBER, 1790. CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE CHURCHES AND THEIR CONSTITUTIONS, MINISTERS, MEMBERS, ASSOCIATIONS, THEIR PLAN AND SENTIMENTS, RULE AND ORDER, PROCEEDINGS AND CORRESPONDENCE. ALSO REMARKS UPON PRACTICAL RELIGION. HUMBLY OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC, BY JOHN ASPLUND.
Thomas Dobson, [Philadelphia:, 1792]
Quarto. iv, [5]-57, [1 blank], 69-70 pp. [as issued]. Untrimmed, first two gatherings uncut. Stitched in original plain drab wrappers [reinforced with clear tape]. Generously margined, but three words trimmed in a footnote at the bottom of page 27. Very Good. Prefaced from Southampton County, Virginia, July 14, 1791, the first year of Asplund's annual Baptist Register. Originally "it was printed in Richmond, Virginia, in 1791 and contained 60 pages in quarto." Dobson also printed another issue in Philadelphia in 1792, containing 70 pages. See, Evans 26583. "In the present issue, the appendix relating to the Baptist churches of Great Britain (p. 58-66) has been omitted, and p. 57 has been reset." The document identifies the minister, number of members, and county of location of each Baptist church in each of the States; and provides data about each Baptist Association. Evans 26582. Howes A361.

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[Baptist Church in Georgia] Lower Canoochee Association:
MINUTES OF THE LOWER CANOOCHEE ASSOCIATION, IN SESSION AT LOWER BLACK CREEK CHURCH. BRYAN COUNTY, GA. FROM THE 10TH TO THE 12TH OF OCTOBER, 1857.
Power Press of John M. Cooper & Co., Savannah:, 1857
8pp, loosened, faint old rubberstamp, toned. Good+. The 'State of the Churches' lists the name, county , messengers, and statistics of each member church. The Circular Letter and Corresponding Letter are signed in type at the end by the Moderator, John G. Williams, and the Clerk, E. Banks. Also printed are the Articles of Faith ["the only true mode of Baptism is Immersion"], the Rules, and the Association's Constitution. Not in De Renne.

Price: $250.00
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[Baptist Church in Georgia] Yellow River Baptist Association:
MINUTES OF THE THIRTIETH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE YELLOW RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, CONVENED AT FRIENDSHIP CHURCH. GWINNETT CO., GA., SEPTEMBER 23, 24, 25, & 26, 1854.
"Messenger" Print, Covington, Georgia:, 1854
8pp, stitched, crudely trimmed [uneven, wide margins at fore-edge], chip at lower blank corners. Scattered foxing. Good+. Willis C. Norris was Moderator. His Circular Letter appears at the end. A table entitled 'State of the Churches' lists each participating church, with its county, delegates' names, and statistical data. The Convention's Minutes reflect the stormy political condition of the country. The delegates "disclaim, in the most unequivocal and emphatic manner, all or any participation in, or fellowship for" a Resolution introduced by Northern Baptists opposing the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which would bring slavery into the Mexican Cession and repeal the 1820 Missouri Compromise. The Association denounces "the presumptuous and, in our judgment, blasphemous assumption and desecration of that sacred name and divine prerogative of the Almighty God by the self-styled clergy..." Not in De Renne.

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[Baptist Church in Georgia] Yellow River Baptist Association:
MINUTES OF THE TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE YELLOW RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. CONVENED AT SORREL'S SPRING CHURCH, WALTON CO, GA., SEPTEMBER 24, 25, 26, AND 27, 1853.
Messenger Print, Covington, Georgia:, 1853
8pp, folded. Light toning, chip to blank lower corner. Else Very Good. Willis C. Norris was Moderator. His Circular Letter precedes a table entitled 'State of the Churches,' with each participating church listed, and its county, delegates' names, statistical data. Minutes of the Convention are printed. Page 8 advertises the "Southern Baptist Messenger," edited by William L. Beebe and "devoted to the service of the Old School Baptists. Not in De Renne.

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[Confederate Sheet Music] Kelp, Joseph:
POPULAR SONG AND CHORUS AD LIB. AURA LEA OR THE MAID WITH GOLDEN HAIR. ARRANGED BY JOSEPH KELP.
Lithographed and Published by Geo. Dunn & Compy., Richmond:, [1864]
9-1/4" x 11-1/2", with decorated title page. [4] pp, words and music. Light to moderate foxing, Good+. Parrish & Willingham 6813.

Price: $250.00
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Folsom, John W.:
THE INDEPENDENT LEDGER AND THE AMERICAN ADVERTISER. JOHN W. FOLSOM'S, ON THE WEST SIDE OF THE MARKET.
Folio, 9-1/2" x 14-3/8". Each page printed in three columns. Disbound, light uniform toning, mild foxing. Very Good. This issue of the paper, begun in 1778 by Folsom and Edward Draper, contains "Verses on the Constitutions of the Several States." "Most human forms of government were made/ For low ambition's more than virtue's aid... But now, behold, a set of new born States." News about local crimes and criminals is reported; a variety of advertisements, local political issues, and other news is printed.

Price: $375.00
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[New Orleans Confederate Imprint] Randall, James R.; G.M. Loening:
ELEGY ON THE DEATH OF LT. COL. CHAS. DREUX. KILLED IN DEFENDING HIS COUNTRY ON THE 5TH OF JULY 1861 IN THE VICINITY OF YORKTOWN VA. WORDS BY JAMES R. RANDALL. MUSIC BY G.M. LOENING.
Published by the Author. 96 Canal St., New Orleans:, [1861]
10" x 12-1/2". 5, [1 blank] pp. Words and music. Disbound, thin paper strip along blank inner margin. At head of title: "Dedicated to the Friends & Companions in arms of the Deceased Warrior." Decorated title page, different type styles, engraving by W.H. Leeson of New Orleans, depicting Dreux's gravestone, surrounded by flowers. Lightly foxed, Good+. Later ownership signature at blank top margin. "Weep, Louisiana, weep..." A rare Confederate imprint. Parrish & Willingham 6986 [4- Yale, Lib. Cong., Boston Athenaeum, Tulane]. Not in Jumonville. OCLC 793004252 [1- Boston Athenaeum] as of March 2017.

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[Free Soil Party] Gibbs, Richard:
CIRCULAR LETTER. HARPERSFIELD, OCT. 20TH, 1856. DEAR SIR: YOU ARE PROBABLY AWARE THAT I AM A CANDIDATE FOR MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY FOR THIS DISTRICT...
Broadside, 5" x 8". Very Good. Gibbs ran on the Free Soil ticket. "I am for FREEDOM and FREE TERRITORY, and opposed to the extension of Slavery; not for invading the constitutional rights of any State, but for keeping Slavery within its proper bounds." Gibbs's Circular reflects contemporary American political turmoil. The overriding question is: "Shall Slavery be confined to its present limits, or be suffered to extend over our vast Western Territories?" He regrets "that the old Political parties at the North might be broken up," but "Never was there a greater difference of opinion among us; men of different opinions, upon this great question, often belong to the same political party, and being attached to a party is not a sure indication of their principles." Not located on OCLC, or the online sites of the New York Public Library, AAS, NY Hist. Soc. as of March 2017.

Price: $375.00
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Grayson, William J.:
JAMES LOUIS PETIGRU. A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.
Harper & Brothers, New York:, 1866
Original cloth, gilt-lettered facsimile signature of Petigru on front cover, gilt-lettered title stamped on spine. Half title, portrait of Petigru [loosened] with original tissue guard. Faint blindstamp. xvii, [2 blanks], [19]-178 pp. Old bookplate on front pastedown, else Very Good. An elite South Carolinian, Petigru was an excellent lawyer who opposed nullification, secession, and the Confederacy. He held a number of offices in the State. This is the primary source on his life. He died in 1863. III Turnbull 410.

Price: $125.00
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Grigsby, Hugh Blair:
THE VIRGINIA CONVENTION OF 1776. A DISCOURSE DELIVERED BEFORE THE VIRGINIA ALPHA OF THE PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY, IN THE CHAPEL OF WILLIAM AND MARY COLLEGE, IN THE CITY OF WILLIAMSBURG, ON THE AFTERNOON OF JULY THE 3RD, 1855.
J.W. Randolph, Richmond, VA:, 1855
206, [2 blanks], xv, [1] pp. Original cloth, slightly shaken, Very Good. The final 16 pages consist of Randolph's bookseller advertisements. The book is an excellent reference for the Convention, which featured such notables as Patrick Henry, James Madison, and Thomas Jefferson. FIRST EDITION. Haynes 7401. Sabin 28844.

Price: $175.00
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Burk, John:
THE HISTORY OF VIRGINIA, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE REVOLUTION. IN THREE VOLUMES.
[Vols. I & II: Dickson & Pescud; Vol. III: John Dickson], Petersburg, Virginia:, 1822
Three volumes, volume III with a folding table after page 88. [2], ii, iv, 348; 335, [1 blank], lxii; 469 pp. Untrimmed, occasional spotting and mild wear. Bound in original paper-covered boards, with contemporary handwritten spine titles on paper labels. Very Good plus. Burk dedicates the book -- comprised of the sheets of the originally published 1804 printing, with new title pages -- to Thomas Jefferson. The author emphasizes the crucial role of Virginia in the establishment of the Nation. "By her population and geographical position, as well as the public spirit and intelligence of her citizens, she stands conspicuous in the confederacy, which her valor hath erected, in common with that of her sister states; and which her spirit and constancy have since improved and supported." "The author dedicates his work to Jefferson, whose ardent disciple he was, and through whose influence he had access to official records, many of which are now lost. In consequence his lengthy appendices are of the highest historical importance" [134 Eberstadt 633, discussing the first edition]. SECOND EDITION. Haynes 2498. 50 Decker 40. See Howes B971 and Church 1298 [first edition].

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[Civil War]:
WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE WAR? WHO ACCOUNTABLE FOR ITS HORRORS AND DESOLATIONS?
Broadside, 9-1/8" x 11-1/2". Printed in two columns, Very Good. The AAS entry for this broadside states that the words at its foot, "For sale by all news agents. Price, per 100," are identical to the language of several 1864 Republican campaign broadsides, published by the National Union Executive Committee, Astor House, New York. "Presumably this edition was also published by the Republican Party's national committee." The broadside begins with "EXTRACTS from a Speech by ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS (now Vice-President of the Confederate States), delivered in the Secession Convention of Georgia, on the 31st day of January, 1861: 'This step (the secession of Georgia,) once taken, can never be recalled; and all the baleful and withering consequences that must follow (as you will see) will rest on the Convention for all coming time... To attempt to overthrow such a Government as this... is the height of madness, folly, and wickedness, to which I can neither lend my sanction nor my vote'." In his 1868 book, 'A Constitutional View of the Late War Between the States,' Stephens declared the Speech to be a "fabrication." There follows an answer to the question, 'WHO COMMENCED THE WAR?' "Those who would throw the guilt of the war upon the shoulders of Mr. Lincoln, are requested to read the following catalogue of 'remarkable events,' published in a Southern Almanac, all of which occurred during the Presidency of Mr. Buchanan." The "Catalogue" is a list of aggressions committed by the Southern States. "All these were warlike and treasonable acts." De Renne 1316. Not in Sabin, Bartlett, Nevins, Eberstadt, LCP, Monaghan. OCLC shows a number of institutional locations.

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[Heath, James E.]:
CIRCULAR. AUDITOR'S OFFICE, RICHMOND, 1OTH MARCH, 1820. SIR,...
Folio sheet, folded to 8" x 10". 1, [3 blanks] pp. Signed at the end in type, "Jas. E. Heath, Auditor." Light old folds for mailing, Very Good. Signed in ink on verso, "The Clerk of Montgomery." Auditor Heath's Circular , evidently unrecorded, seeks information on assessments from the local Commissioners of Revenue "in your county."

Price: $80.00
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[Mordecai, M(oses) C(ohn)]:
ANSWERS BY THE CHARLESTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, TO QUESTIONS PROPOUNDED BY THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
24pp. Modern plain wrappers. The title page is preceded by a leaf [with two light rubberstamps in blank upper and lower margins], signed in type by the Chamber's Secretary, William B. Heriot, printing the Chamber's resolutions approving the Answers. Except as noted, Very Good. Mordecai, Charleston's most prominent Jewish citizen, chaired the Committee preparing these Answers. "At various times, he was vice-president of the Charleston Ancient Artillery Society, a member of the board of health, captain of the Marion Artillery, a member of the committee on civic improvements, warden of police, commissioner of markets, a delegate to the Augusta Convention, a commissioner of pilotage, state representative, state senator, and director of the Southwestern Railroad Bank, the Gas Light Company, the South Carolina Insurance Company, and the Farmers' and Exchange Bank" [online findagrave.com]. The questions propounded by U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert Walker concerned the effect of the tariff on South Carolina's economy. Appointed by President Polk, who favored low tariffs, Walker doubtless hoped that the Committee would respond as it did: that South Carolina was "injuriously affected by the present high duties." The Answers demonstrate "the unequal operation of the existing tariff system, its devastating influence upon the industry of the country generally, and upon the interests of the planting States more especially." The Tariff of 1846, known as the 'Walker Tariff,' would substantially reduce existing tariffs OCLC 23978567 [6] as of March 2017 [all locations north of the Mason Dixon line except for the University of North Carolina]. III Turnbull 1.

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Miller, A.E.:
MILLER'S PLANTERS' AND MERCHANTS' ALMANAC, FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1854...FOR THE STATES OF CAROLINA AND GEORGIA... TO WHICH IS ANNEXED, A LIST OF THE CHIEF OFFICERS OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, AND OF THE STATE OF SOUTH-CAROLINA, CITY OF CHARLESTON, &C. WITH THE TIMES OF HOLDING COURTS AND MUCH OTHER GENERAL INFORMATION; WITH A GARDENER'S CALENDAR...
Walker & Evans, Charleston, S.C.:, [1853]
48pp, plus yellow advertisement pages preceding and following the almanac [holes in the advt. pages, small loss]; blank interleaves. In original printed blue boards [paper label of Apprentices' Library Society], and quarter morocco spine. Front board loose but present. Several text leaves loose, lower quadrant of one leaf torrn with loss. Otherwise a Good copy. The Almanac includes a "Calendar of Fasts, Festivals, and other days, Observed by the Israelites. For the Year 5614-15." With information on the militia, Police of the City of Charleston, South Carolina College, Free Schools, Medical Societies and Colleges, Banks, Insurance Companies, the Post Office, South Carolina Railroad, an article on cultivation of the fig tree, and the items promised by the title. III Turnbull 169-170. Not in Singerman.

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[University of the South]:
ADDRESS OF THE COMMISSIONERS FOR RAISING THE ENDOWMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH.
B.M. Norman, Publisher, New Orleans:, 1859
Original printed wrappers [moderately foxed], stitched, 16pp. Widely scattered light text foxing. Good+. The pamphlet recounts the history of efforts to establish the University. "The Southern States have not been indifferent to the subject of Collegiate education. Each of these States, at a very early period of its history, has founded an University, upon which it was intended to concentrate the patronage of the State Legislature. Could this policy have been adhered to steadily, free from the interference of popular clamor, or religious differences, the University which we are now proposing to establish might have been unnecessary... The South needs, more than ever, men of the very highest education, who shall prove that our institutions are not adverse to the loftiest culture... The world is trying hard to persuade us that a slaveholding people cannot be a people of high moral and intellectual culture." The triumvirate of Bishops Otey, Leonidas Polk, and Elliott led the effort, with a Board of Trustees consisting of the Bishops of eleven southern States [not Virginia or Kentucky]. This document prints the Trustees' Declaration of Principles, placing the University "under the sole and perpetual direction of the Protestant Episcopal Church." Pages 15-16 print the Act to Establish the University of the South, enacted by the Tennessee Legislature in 1858. Jumonville 2882. De Renne 605.

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[Maine]:
TO THE DEMOCRATS OF AROOSTOOK COUNTY.
Broadside, 12" x 17". Some old folds, several fox spots, couple of short closed margin tears [no loss]. Good+. Signed in type at the end by about 140 loyal Aroostook Democrats. The Kansas-Nebraska Act opened the Mexican Cession to Slavery and thus repealed the 1820 Missouri Compromise. Deep divisions in the Democratic Party resulted. Many Northern Democrats resisted the call of their dominant Southern brethren to populate the newly acquired Territories with slaves. Maine's Hannibal Hamlin, for example, abandoned the Democrats over the Slavery issue, and became a Republican [and Lincoln's running mate in 1860]. This broadside excoriates such apostates, who have joined forces with anti-slavery men "to batten and prey upon the very life of the Democratic Party," and who are "pledged to opposition to the regular democracy." Hyperbolically, the broadside accuses them of opposing the Party's "very EXISTENCE, plotting her ENTIRE OVERTHROW and DESTRUCTION." Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.

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[Free Soil Party in Connecticut]:
PURSUANT TO PREVIOUS NOTICE, A MEETING OF THE FRIENDS OF FREE SOIL, CONVENED AT THE TOWN HALL, IN SUFFIELD, ON THE 8TH DAY OF JULY, 1848... TO THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT.
Broadside, 8-1/4" x 13-5/8. Light margin wear. 'Released' rubberstamp of Connecticut Historical Society on blank verso. Very Good. The Meeting voted to offer these Proceedings "for publication to the Hartford Courant, the Hartford Times and the Charter Oak." Dated and signed in type at the end, "Samuel N. Reid, Secretary. David Hale, Chairman. Suffield, July 8th, 1848." This rare and significant broadside records the historic beginnings of the Free Soil Party, the precursor to the Republicans. The end of the Mexican War brought a divisive question to the forefront of American political life: Would the Territories acquired from Mexico be Slave or Free? Many Northern Democrats and Whigs, fearful that the "Slave Power" controlled their parties, experienced "deep and grave dissatisfaction." "Gen. Cass is the supple tool of Slave-holders and Slavery extensionists... Gen. Taylor is also opposed to the restriction of the limits of Slavery,-- and therefore we dare not trust either of them with the interests of Free Labor." The new Party takes the position advocated by Abraham Lincoln a decade later: disclaiming any intention to interfere "with the reserved rights and domestic institutions of any of the States of the Union, we are, at the same time, the determined and uncompromising opponents of the extension of Slavery over any territory now free." The Meeting calls for the selection of delegates "to represent this State, in the National Convention at Buffalo, on the 9th day of August, 1848," in order "to form an effective organization for the defence of the principles of Freedom, and to oppose the extension of Slavery." The Buffalo Convention nominated Martin Van Buren and John P. Hale for the presidency and vice presidency. OCLC 22947076 [2- CT Hist. Soc., CT State Lib.] as of March 2017. Not located in Work, LCP, Blockson, Dumond.

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Blair, Frank P., Jun.:
COLONIZATION AND COMMERCE. AN ADDRESS BEFORE THE YOUNG MEN'S MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF CINCINNATI, OHIO, NOVEMBER 29, 1859. BY... OF MISSOURI.
8pp, caption title [as issued]. Disbound, light margin spotting. Good+. Blair explains his pet project: combining emancipation with colonization "in the congenial regions of the American tropics, for such of our negroes as are now free, or who hereafter may be enfranchised by States or individuals, and who may choose to go there, and to offer them such inducements, by securing them self-government, free homesteads, and protection against foreign or domestic molestation, as they will not and cannot refuse." Blair argues that "the two races cannot occupy the same States without mutual injury." And slavery injures, most of all, other whites "by monopolizing and degrading all the industrial occupations, which elsewhere supply the wants of an independent yeomanry, puts education within their reach, and makes improvement possible." FIRST EDITION. LCP 1253. Not in Sabin, Thomson, Eberstadt, Work.

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[New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company]:
OFFICIAL STENOGRAPHER'S REPORT OF THE TESTIMONY OF CHARLES S. MELLEN, PRESIDENT, AND EDWARD D. ROBBINS, GENERAL COUNSEL, OF THE NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD COMPANY BEFORE THE HON. CHARLES A. PROUTY INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSIONER AT BOSTON, MASS., MAY 2, 1913.
Doane Street Press, Boston, MA:, [1913]
79, [1] pp, two staples. Minor wear, Very Good. This report contains the testimony of Charles S. Mellen and Edward D. Robbins. Most of the questions are asked by Commissioners Charles A. Prouty and Charles F. Choate, Jr., a New Haven lawyer. The testimony concerns the financial dealings of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad Company, including income, expenses, repairs, fares charged, stock purchases and sales. This Railroad was chartered in 1872; the New York & New Haven Railroad and the Hartford & New Haven Railroad merged to create it. By 1890 the Company's revenue exceeded million annually; J.P. Morgan gained control of its Board. Morgan appointed Charles Mellen as president of the company, and sought to achieve a monopoly of New England transportation. By the early 1900s he had absorbed most of the smaller independent railroads in southern New England, as well as steamboat and trolley lines. Louis D. Brandeis investigated the Company in 1907, concluded that it was overextended, and claimed that the NY, NH & Hartford was manipulating accounting records. The Interstate Commerce Commission held hearings in 1913 to investigate the financial condition of the Company. Its Report confirmed Brandeis's conclusions. The release of the report and Mellen's resignation led to the collapse of this corporate giant. ["A Guide to the New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad Small Format Photograph and Postcard Collection, ca. 1870s-1960s," UCONN Archives & Special Collections, Call No. 1991.0133; http://archives.lib.uconn.edu/; and "Louis D. Brandeis Versus the New Haven Railroad, Part I," April 8, 2016, Brandeis and Harlan Watch, managed by Scott Campbell, Archivist at the University of Louisville Law Library, https://brandeiswatch.wordpress.com/2016/04/08, accessed online 5/19/2017.] OCLC 27807619 [6] [as of May 2017].

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Hawles, Sir John:
THE ENGLISHMAN'S RIGHT, OR, A DIALOGUE BETWEEN A BARRISTER AT LAW AND A JURYMAN; SHEWING, 1. THE ANTIQUITY. 2. THE EXCELLENT DESIGNED USE. 3. THE OFFICE AND JUST PRIVILEGES OF JURIES BY THE LAW OF ENGLAND. (BEING A CHOICE HELP FOR ALL WHO ARE QUALIFIED BY LAW, TO SERVE ON JURIES). BY SIR JOHN HAWLES, KNT. SOLICITOR GENERAL TO THE LATE KING WILLIAM. TO WHICH IS PREFIXED, AN INTRODUCTORY ESSAY, ON THE MORAL DUTY OF A JUDGE. BY LORD BACON.
Printed by John Thompson, of Philadelphia; for Alexander Brodie, Philadelphia:, 1798
viii, [17]-70 pp [as issued]. Contemporary quarter calf and marbled paper boards [front board darkened at upper forecorner; lower portion of spine chipped]. The second of two front free endpapers has a blank corner tear. Very Good, with the 1809 ownership signature of Wm. Barret. The Publisher Note explains that he published this tract "to preserve Trial by Jury inviolate." It merits the particular "attention of Citizen and Alien," doubtless because he believed the recent enactment of the Alien & Sedition Laws threatened that ancient right. First published in London in 1680, it was reprinted in Boston in 1772. This second American edition endorses the primacy of the right of jury trial in American jurisprudence. To avoid any implication of Anglophilia, Brodie writes, "But lest the title 'The Englishman's Right' should give offence to any, it is proper to observe that the Charter of the Liberties of England is a grant from their kings obtained by force. This charter is the fountain of all their Rights; and among others of the Englishman's Right to be tried by a Jury of his Equals. As Americans we possess the same Right... But we claim no right by conquest or descent from the people of England. We hold our Liberties from God alone." Evans 33862. Cohen 1481. Marvin 376 [London: 1770]. Marke 187 [London: 1680].

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[Lundy, Benjamin]:
THE ORIGIN AND TRUE CAUSES OF THE TEXAS INSURRECTION, COMMENCED IN THE YEAR 1835.
32pp. Caption title, as issued. Stitched, lightly foxed, Good+. Lundy was, according to Howes, the "first to ascribe this war to a slave-holding conspiracy." Lundy explains that his critique is "of vital importance to the cause of Liberty and Human Rights." Beginning with the Anglo-American colonization of Texas in 1820, he describes the ensuing corruption: "The swindling operations in the Yazoo land speculations were mere child's play in comparison." Emigrants from the United States to Texas routinely evaded the laws "forbidding the introduction of slaves." "First edition in book form of eight articles written by Lundy, under the pseudonym of 'Columbus' for the National Gazette early in 1836. Lundy gives a careful analysis of the Declaration of Independence 'recently issued by the Texas colonists'." [Eberstadt]. Lundy visited Texas several times, attempting to establish a Mexican colony for free slaves. Howes L569 'aa'. Streeter, Texas 1216. 165 Eberstadt 502. Rader 2265.

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Pollard, Edward A.:
OBSERVATIONS IN THE NORTH: EIGHT MONTHS IN PRISON AND ON PAROLE.
E.W. Ayres, Corner Ninth and Main Streets, Richmond:, 1865
vii, [1 blank], [9]-142 pp, as issued. Light spotting at upper forecorners. With original printed front wrapper [rubberstamp number]. The book, with wrapper, is bound into later limp cloth with the later front cover detached but present. Else Very Good. Deemed the last Confederate imprint, the 'Observations' was published in March 1865, as the City fell to Union troops. A journalist, Pollard was a passenger on a blockade runner seized by Union forces. Imprisoned at Fort Warren, he was later paroled. Howes P457. Confederate Hundred 68. In Tall Cotton 149. Parrish & Willingham 4994.

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Miller, A.E.:
MILLER'S PLANTERS' AND MERCHANTS' ALMANAC FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1845...FOR THE STATES OF CAROLINA & GEORGIA... TO WHICH IS ANNEXED. A LIST OF THE CHIEF OFFICERS OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, AND OF THE STATE OF SOUTH-CAROLINA, CITY OF CHARLESTON, &C. WITH THE TIMES OF HOLDING COURTS; AND MUCH OTHER GENERAL INFORMATION; WITH A GARDENER'S CALENDAR, PREPARED FOR THIS ALMANAC SOME YEARS AGO.
Printed by Miller & Browne, Charleston, S.C.:, [1844]
[48] pp, plus interleaves [usually blank, a couple of contemporary notes]. 'Second Edition' at head of title. Bound in rare contemporary printed and decorated green boards, rear board advertising "Miller & Brown, Book and Job Printers, At the Old Stand, No. 4 Broad-Street..." Text browned. Very Good. The Almanac includes a "Calendar of Fasts, Festivals, and other days, Observed by the Israelites. For the Year 5605"; information on the militia, Police of the City of Charleston, South Carolina College, Free Schools, Medical Societies and Colleges, Banks, Insurance Companies, the Post Office, South Carolina Railroad, an article on cultivation of the fig tree, and the items promised by the title. Drake 13349 [not locating any copies of the first edition]. II Turnbull 495. Not in Singerman or Rosenbach.

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[South Carolina]:
LAWS AND REGULATIONS; FOR THE MILITIA OF THE STATE OF SOUTH-CAROLINA, DIRECTED TO BE PRESENTED TO EACH COMMISSIONED OFFICER, BY THE LEGISLATURE.
From the Press of Timothy and Mason, Charleston:, 1794
12mo. 188, [5], [1 blank] pp, with the half title, as issued. Frontis engraving [coat of arms with South Carolina and American flags, Screaming Eagle; original tissue guard] plus eight folded plates, collated as issued. Light foxing. Very Good, in modern calf and gilt-lettered red morocco spine label, with two modern bookplates on the front pastedown. A rare South Carolina imprint. The last page is an 'Explanation of the Plates.' The book prints the Act of the Second Congress "establishing an uniform militia throughout the United States"; South Carolina's "Act to organize the militia... in conformity with the Act of Congress"; "Rules and articles" of war, according to resolve of Congress, September 20, 1776; "Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States." FIRST EDITION. Evans 27720. Gould & Morgan 1074. Cohen 8960. I Turnbull 305. ESTC W8505 [6].

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Brockenbrough, W.H.:
THE RIGHT OF INSTRUCTION. THE VIRGINIA DOCTRINE CONSIDERED. BEING AN ANSWER TO THE LETTERS OF JUDGE JOSEPH HOPKINSON. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER.
Printed by James Alexander, Charlottesville, Va.:, 1837
Disbound. Clean closed tear on title page expertly repaired on blank verso without loss, barely noticeable from the recto. 54, [2 blanks] pp. Light toning and mild foxing. Else Very Good. This scarce pamphlet addresses the power of a State Legislature to control the vote of its United States Senator. Brockenbrough supports the Virginia Doctrine, which deemed legislative instruction "an authoritative lawful command." The power to instruct was based on the Constitutional requirement that U.S. Senators be chosen by the State's legislature, rather than [as today] by the people. Brockenbrough argues that, once instructed, a Senator's "only option which we allow him is that of resigning or obeying." For, "wherever a Constitution rests the power to elect a Representative, there lies the power to instruct." Brockenbrough examines early Virginia and American history, particularly the conduct of Patrick Henry and John Marshall, in support of the Virginia Doctrine. Cohen 4906. Haynes 2159. OCLC 6478800 [8] as of March 2017.

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Benjamin, Judah P.:
CORRESPONDENCE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE, IN RELATION TO THE BRITISH CONSULS RESIDENT IN THE CONFEDERATE STATES.
55pp, stitched, original printed wrappers [several chips], light Rebel Archives rubberstamps on front wrap and three subsequent pages, else Very Good. Secretary of State Benjamin's diplomatic correspondence concerning the delicate British attempts to maintain positive relations with the Confederacy. Although England withheld recognition of its independence. England wished to protect its subjects residing in the South who were drafted into the army. Also included is Georgia Governor Brown's correspondence advising the British to stop interfering with the Confederate military draft. FIRST EDITION. P&W 1783. Crandall 839. Not in Singerman.

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[Cherokee]:
CONSTITUTION AND LAWS OF THE CHEROKEE NATION. PUBLISHED BY AN ACT OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL. 1892.
Foley R'Y Printing Co., Parsons, KS:, 1892 [ie, 1893]
425, VII pp. Loose textblock, early leaves chipped at blank fore-edge, covers worn and detached. One index page with large chip to corner [repaired on verso, no loss]. Good Rader 714. Hargrett 71. Gilcrease-Hargrett p.73.

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[Barry, Joseph]:
THE ANNALS OF HARPER'S FERRY WITH SKETCHES OF ITS FOUNDER, AND MANY PROMINENT CHARACTERS CONNECTED WITH ITS HISTORY, ANECDOTES, &C, BY JOSEPHUS, JUNIOR. SECOND EDITION.
Office of the "Berkeley Union", Martinsburg, W. VA:, 1872
126pp, two plates, stitched. Original printed and illustrated wrappers [chipped at extremities without affecting text or illustration]. Front wrapper illustrated with a portrait of John Brown [repeated after page 32], rear wrapper with a portrait of John W. Garrett [repeated after page 110]. Text clean. Advertisement for the Mountain View Hotel in Harper's Ferry laid down on the plain inner rear wrapper. Good+. This is the second edition, substantially enhanced, "the unexpected success of a prior and much smaller edition" [Hagerstown, 1869] having prompted it. The book treats the early history of the Town, but emphasizes the important period from John Brown's raid through the end of the Civil War. Born in Ireland, Barry spent most of his life in Harper's Ferry and became an authority on its history. He witnessed many of the described events, including the John Brown Raid; he attended Brown's trial. The advertisement for Mountain View Hotel measures 4" x 6.25" and contains about 20 lines of text. It reads: O.E. MALTBY

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[Confederate [?] Broadside Verse]:
THERE'S "NO BODY" HURT!!
Illustration at head of verse: man in top hat wears a poster that bears the title. Printed on white paper with black ink, text within ornamental border. 4-1/2" x 7-3/4". Trimmed closely to the border, mounted, minor wear. Very Good. A scarce broadside poem which begins, "There lives a man at Washington, A narrow-minded squirt..." The poem is an unfavorable critique of Abraham Lincoln. It "contains satire aimed at the President, who, it was said, repeated these words" [Semmes, 'Civil War Song Sheets,' in Maryland Historical Magazine, September 1943, page 218-219, footnote 19]. As President-Elect, Lincoln made several speeches on the way to Washington, seeking to calm the country. But his words were, as his biographer Stephen Oakes said, "Dismally trite." Lincoln said at Columbus, "There is nothing going wrong... Nobody is suffering anything." At Pittsburgh: "There is no crisis except an artificial one." Several institutional collections consider this a Confederate imprint. That may be so, but there were plenty of criticisms of Lincoln within the Union-- especially early in his administration. Neither Parrish & Willingham, Crandall, nor Hummel records it. Wake Forest Confederate Broadside Collection. Rubenstein Library at Duke University #bsvg200626. Getty Library Civil War Collection. See, Oakes, With Malice Toward None [Harper Perennial Edition, page 209].

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Junius [pseud.]:
THE LETTERS OF JUNIUS, COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME, WITH A COPIOUS INDEX.
Printed for Robert Campbell, Philadelphia:, 1795
12mo. [4], xii, 13-283, [13] pp. Original calf with gilt spine rules, gilt-lettered spine title on black morocco. Occasional and widely scattered foxing, Very Good. Early ownership signature on front free endpaper, 'Ephraim Hinds.' The preface, a 'Dedication to the English Nation,' exhorts readers "never to suffer an invasion of YOUR political constitution, however minute the instance may appear, to pass by, without a determined, persevering resistance. One precedent creates another.- They soon accumulate and constitute law." SECOND AMERICAN EDITION. Evans 28912.

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[California]:
PROCEEDINGS OF A PUBLIC MEETING OF THE DEMOCRATIC MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE OF CALIFORNIA, OPPOSED TO THE ELECTION OF A UNITED STATES SENATOR AT THE PRESENT SESSION OF THE LEGISLATURE, HELD IN THE SENATE CHAMBER AT BENICIA, ON THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 2, 1854.
Placer Times and Transcript Office, San Francisco:, 1854
8pp, bound in attractive modern quarter calf and marbled boards, gilt spine lettering. Very Good. A significant chapter in the epic Gwin-Broderick struggle, which split the California Democratic Party on the Kansas-Nebraska issue and ended only with Broderick's death in a duel with Chief Justice David Terry of the California Supreme Court. At the time of this public meeting, Broderick was President of the California Senate and sought to engineer his own election to the U.S. Senate to replace Senator Gwin, whose term would expire on March 4, 1855. These California Democrats resist the attempt to steamroll Broderick's election, arguing that only "the Legislature next preceding a new senatorial term, has the right to elect." Discussing this item, Eberstadt says, "The 'public meeting' was held in the Senate Chamber at Benicia and the proceedings give a clear insight into local politics just prior to vigilante days." Cowan 502. Greenwood 491 [1- CU-B]. 136 Eberstadt 157. OCLC 21658923 [6- 4 in CA, Yale, KY Hist. Soc.] as of March 2017.

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[Free Soil Party]:
TO FREE SOIL MEN OF MAINE WHO DO NOT TAKE THE PORTLAND INQUIRER!
Broadside, 8" x 13". Printed in two columns, "Portland Inquirer- Extra" printed at head of title. Light foxing, light blank margin wear, else a Very Good copy of a rare survival. "The Portland Inquirer is the last permutation of a series of anti-slavery newspapers in Portland and Maine. It was one of three party politics abolitionist papers: the Liberty Standard and the Free Soil Republican being the other two. It ran from 1851-1855 and then merged with the Maine Temperance Journal to become the Maine Temperance Journal and Inquirer." [web site of the Maine Historical Society] The editors of the Inquirer urge all anti-slavery men to support the 'Inquirer'. "We want your assistance in supporting a FREE SOIL PAPER IN MAINE... Without a vigorous free press, no organized action can be had in the State." Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.

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[Whig Party in Massachusetts]:
ADDRESS OF THE DISTRICT COMMITTEE TO THE WHIGS OF DISTRICT NO. 4.
4pp. Caption title, as issued. Folded to 8vo. Signed at the end in type by five members of the District Committee. Light soil, else Very Good. The District Committee, headed by John Sargent, urges Whigs to stick together: many Northern Whigs were disappointed by Zachary Taylor's nomination and election. Taylor, a political cypher, was a renowned military leader and Louisiana plantation owner. In particular, the Committee urges Whigs of District No. 4 to support the regular Whig Party candidate for Congress, Benjamin Thompson, against his opponent, John Palfrey, who has "abandoned the party, and... allied himself with your bitterest opponents." Palfrey had become a "Conscience Whig," i.e., an anti-slavery man, and then a candidate of the anti-slavery Free Soil Party. Not located on OCLC as of March 2017. Not in Sabin.

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[Philadelphia Fire Company]:
NOTICE. THE HAND IN HAND FIRE COMPANY HAVE APPOINTED THEIR NEXT MEETING TO BE AT OELLERS'S, ON THE FIRST MONDAY IN APRIL, AT SEVEN O'CLOCK IN THE EVENING. FRIDAY, MARCH 31, 1797.
5-3/4" x 3-1/2", oblong. Attractively printed ticket, signed in ink "J.B. Bordley Clk." Fine. An early fire company ephemeron. "The 'hand in hand' name and clasped hand symbol were popular among volunteer fire fighting companies and fire insurance companies during this period. It symbolized the mutual assistance needed to combat fires and the fraternal ties of fire companies prevalent in early American communities. This Hand in Hand Fire Company was founded March 1st 1741, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and located in the Dockward at the Fish Market and Drawbridge" [website of the National Museum of American History]. "In 1791, James Oeller opened his eponymous hotel, Philadelphia's first, at Sixth and Chestnut Streets. Oeller's assembly room, decorated with French wallpaper and antique illustrations, challenged the City Tavern as Philadelphia's finest banquet space." [Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia]. Bordley, a prominent agriculturist, was a founder of the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture.

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San Francisco Vigilance Committee:
PICTORIAL LETTER SHEET SHOWING 'FORT VIGILANT ROOMS OF THE COMMITTEE SACRAMENTO ST. BETN. DAVIS & FRONT' [and] 'MASS MEETING ENDORSING THE ACTS OF THE VIGILANCE COMMITTEE JUNE 14TH'. [with] CONSTITUTION AND ADDRESS OF THE VIGILANCE COMMITTEE... ADOPTED, MAY 15, 1856.
Lith. Britton & Rey, [San Francisco]:, [1856]
Two leaves, unnumbered, on a single folio sheet folded to 8-3/8" x 10-5/8". One page has the two illustrations, which are in excellent condition. The final leaf prints the Committee's Constitution and Address, which has scuffing to portions of some letters. Good+. The front of this rare letter sheet displays two engraved images, lithographed from daguerreotypes by the influential and pioneering San Francisco photographer, Robert Vance. The upper image, "Rooms of the Committee...," depicts the Committee's headquarters, an imposing two-story building defended by armed guards and cannons. Filled gunny sacks and a cannon guard the entrance; ship masts are in the background. The lower image, "Mass Meeting...," shows the crowded assembly. Speakers address the crowd from the balcony of a building festooned with two large American flags. The conjugate leaf prints, in three columns, the Constitution and Address of the Vigilance Committee. They explain the breakdown of law and order, and the Committee's mission "for maintenance of the peace and good order of society - the prevention and punishment of crime - the preservation of our lives and property, and to insure that our ballot-boxes shall hereafter express the actual and unforged will of the majority of our citizens." OCLC 43694738 [1- Lib. Cong.], 191115824 [no locations listed] as of March 2017.

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[Louisiana]:
RAILROAD MORTGAGE BOND: NO. 7585
Maverick, Stephan & Co., Lithographers, New York:, 1872
Broadsheet, 18" x 23 1/2". Recto printed with black ink, red underprinted; verso entirely in green ink. Top half of the sheet contains mortgage certificate, with a large vignette of a stream train and a small vignette of mother pelican with her babies and the words "I Live and Die for Those I Love." Bond has preprinted signature of Levi Parsons, President. Bottom half of sheet has 60 small coupons attached, with bond numbers rubberstamped in blue ink and preprinted with the signature of Chas. V. Ware. Denominated in both dollars and British sterling, each payment coupon $35/L7.4S. The verso contains the title of the bond, 28 sections for registering names and dates, as well as the backs of the coupons. Minor wear, few very tiny holes in one coupon with minimal loss. Very Good to Near Fine. The New Orleans, Baton Rouge & Vicksburg Railroad was officially chartered in 1872 and ran until about 1881.

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Ames, Nathaniel:
AN ASTRONOMICAL DIARY, OR, ALMANACK FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD CHRIST 1769.
Printed and Sold by William McAlpine in Marlborough-Street, Boston:, [1768]
12mo. 12 leaves (complete), Some spotting and marginalia, stitched, Good+. A scarce printing of an oft-printed 1769 almanac. It is one of two states of this McAlpine imprint; the other has a comma in the imprint after 'McAlpine.' It includes a discourse on the manufacture of silk and the five eclipses that will occur during the year; lists roads and distances to and from various New England cities; and tells 'An Indian Story' involving a dispute between the French and the Natchez Indians. Evans 10815 Drake 3171. NAIP w019326 [5].

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[Sugar Act]:
OBSERVATIONS ON THE CASE OF THE NORTHERN COLONIES.
Printed for J. Roberts, London:, 1731
31, [1 blank] pp. Scattered foxing [generally light], bound in modern decorative wrappers. Good+. Sabin calls the pamphlet "A vindication of the Sugar Act, then pending in Parliament. This act prohibited the northern colonies from trading for sugar, etc., with the French West Indies, and required them to obtain these articles from the British West Indies or from England." The anonymous author examines the economies and trading practices of the American colonies. Carefully analyzing their economies, their trade with the French West Indies, and the advantages that such trade confers upon the French enemy, he concludes that "the dispute is only with New England," although New York and Pennsylvania have been insufficiently helpful. Maryland, Virginia and the Carolinas have not interfered with England's trade in a manner "so injurious to their Mother Country." They "therefore have a Merit with their Mother Country, which New England, New York and Pensilvania can in no wise pretend to." Sabin 56510. Kress 3956. ESTC T10214.

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[Neill, Andrew]:
TO THE PUBLIC. FACTS AGAINST ASSERTIONS--- PROOF AGAINST DENUNCIATIONS.
Folio sheet, folded to 8-3/8" x 11-1/4". [4]pp, each page printed in three columns. Toned. Old fold lines, a couple of short tears [no text loss] and a few pinholes [no text loss]. A rare, apparently unrecorded imprint. Good+. Signed in type by Andrew Neill at the end and dated, also in type, "August 5th '59." Neill was a Texas lawyer who had fought in its War of Independence. Engaged also in politics, he lost his election for Lieutenant Governor in 1855. His papers are at the University of Texas. Neill opposed Thomas Waul's run for Congress against Andrew Hamilton in 1859. Waul, a lawyer and plantation owner, would become a Confederate Congressman and a soldier for the Confederacy. [See, Handbook of Texas]. Neill says that Waul's "conduct has been illiberal, ungentlemanly, and cowardly." Buttressing his charges with documentation from newspaper accounts, Neill charges that Waul had pillaged an estate "of which he was trustee," taking for himself "some of the slaves, that belonged to the estate." Some of those slaves were the subject of sales transactions between Waul and Robert E. Lee. Neill expands on the evidence supporting his assertions, and denounces Waul's chicanery. Not in Eberstadt, Sabin, Decker, Raines, Rader, Graff. As of March 2016 we do not locate this rarity on OCLC or the online sites of AAS, Yale, Harvard, SMU, U TX., NYPL, Newberry, Library of Congress.

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[Rhode Island]:
(CIRCULAR.) GENTLEMEN, THE FREEMEN OF THE TOWN OF PROVIDENCE, DEEPLY IMPRESSED WITH THE INEQUALITY AND INJUSTICE OF THE ESTIMATE OF THE RATEABLE PROPERTY OF THE STATE, AS REPORTED BY SEVEN OF THE STATE'S COMMITTEE, AND ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY...
Broadside, 12-3/4" x 15-1/2", dated in type at the top, "Providence, June 29th, 1796." Six paragraphs in two columns separated by a decorative vertical line. A short, closed margin tear; a small pinhole slightly affecting a letter; light toning. Irregular bottom edge. Very Good. Signed in ink at the bottom "In Behalf of the Town" by Jabez Bowen, Moderator. This scarce broadside invites "other towns to choose delegates to a meeting to be held in Providence July 26, 1796, in opposition to the tax estimate recently enacted by the state, and to devise means for securing redress." A great public outcry resulted from the legislation; citizens of Providence and some other towns charged that they had been taxed unfairly and excessively. The Circular denounces "the glaring inconsistency of an Estimate, by which enormous additions were made to some Towns, and the advantages to be derived from those additions confined to a few, who had no greater claim to relief than others, but obtained it by their influence in the Committee." Charges of corruption and misfeasance are legion. Evans 31059. Alden 1481. NAIP w011880 [4].

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[Rhode Island] Dorrance, John:
TO THE FREEMEN OF THE STATE OF RHODE-ISLAND. IT HAVING BEEN REPRESENTED THAT MR. WILLIAM GREENE, AS ONE OF THE STATE'S COMMITTEE, CONDUCTED IMPROPERLY, I THINK IT A DUTY TO GIVE A TRUE STATE OF THAT BUSINESS IN RESPECT TO HIM...
Printed by D. Wheeler, Providence:, [1796]
Broadside, 9-1/8" x 11-1/2". Old fold lines, light wear and soil. Else Very Good, with irregular bottom edge. This unrecorded broadside expresses the public outrage over a State Committee's determination of the various rates at which Rhode Island towns would be taxed. Committeeman Greene was vilified for voting to increase taxes for certain towns. Dorrance defends Greene's honor and integrity, although Greene's views "differed very much from myself." Dorrance signs his name in type at the bottom, with the printed place and date: "Providence, August 26, 1796." John Dorrance [c.1747-1813], a native of Providence, graduated from Brown University in 1774. He was a Justice of the Court of Common Pleas; was involved with the Washington Insurance Company and a director of the Exchange Bank. Governor Fenner once accused Dorrance of having sold the body of a stranger who had committed suicide in exchange for a beaver skin hat. Fenner used the charge to squash Dorrance's run for a seat in the General Assembly in 1801; Dorrance later sued for slander. Not in Evans, Shipton & Mooney, Bristol, NAIP, ESTC, Alden, or [as of March 2017] on the online sites of OCLC, Library of Congress, AAS, Brown University, Yale, Harvard.

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Cobbett, William:
PORCUPINE'S POLITICAL CENSOR, FOR NOVEMBER 1796. CONTAINING OBSERVATIONS ON THE INSOLENT AND SEDITIOUS NOTES, COMMUNICATED TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES BY THE LATE FRENCH MINISTER ADET.
Printed for, and sold by, William Cobbett., Philadelphia:, Nov 1796
78 pp. Disbound, else Very Good. Cobbett's blistering attack on the "Gallic usurpers" and especially Minister Adet, with a strong defense of President Washington and his stewardship of foreign policy. Adet, egged on by the Francophiles in Washington's administration (particularly Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe), had abused his hospitality in this country by publicly attacking the Treaty with England, which would supplant France with England as America's chief ally. Gaines [Cobbett] writes that the pamphlet contains "a careful discussion of treaties." Cobbett describes Jefferson as "a Frenchman in politics and morality." Evans 30226. Gaines (Concealed Authorship) 96-55. Gaines (Cobbett) 25a.

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Crocker, Charles F.:
LETTER SIGNED, 25 AUGUST 1884 ON SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD LETTERHEAD, TO STEPHEN B. ELKINS, CHAIRMAN OF THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE.
Four leaves, written in neat ink manuscript on rectos only, docketed on verso of last leaf. Signed in ink by Crocker at the end, with a different pen and in a different hand from the text. Near Fine. Charles F. Crocker was a Vice President of the Southern Pacific Railroad and the eldest son of Charles Crocker, one of the Big Four railroad men. Young Crocker writes a long, detailed letter to Elkins. A major figure in the Republican Party, Elkins was a wealthy lawyer and industrialist who made his money in railroads, mining, and real estate in New Mexico, and then in West Virginia. He had been New Mexico's territorial delegate to Congress, and would later become Secretary of War. The city of Elkins, West Virginia, bears his name. He managed James Blaine's campaign for the presidency in 1884. Crocker begins by thanking Elkins for seeing to the interests of the Southern Pacific by "securing a conservative State Platform... Our corporate interests now lie in the success of the Republican Ticket, for which we are exerting ourselves to make a clean sweep." The Ticket, he says, "will help us materially in carrying the State for Blaine and Logan." Crocker worries mainly about the Republican Congressional candidate in San Francisco-- "the united colored vote of this city" is strongly for his Democratic opponent. Crocker urges a major effort to overturn this unreasonable allegiance.

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Florida in the Confederacy:
THE ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED AT THE 1ST SESSION OF THE 12TH GENERAL ASSSEMBLY OF FLORIDA, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CAPITOL, IN THE CITY OF TALLAHASSEE, ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1862.
Office of the Floridian & Journal. Printed by Dyke & Carlisle, Tallahassee:, 1862
79, [1 blank], IV pp. Bound in institutional cloth, gilt-lettered spine labels, institutional bookplate. A clean and lightly worn text. Very Good. An early Florida Confederate imprint, with much material on the ongoing War. Parrish & Willingham 2734.

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[Louisiana Confederate Imprint]:
ACTS PASSED BY THE TWENTY-SEVENTH LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA, IN EXTRA SESSION AT OPELOUSAS, DECEMBER, 1862 & JANUARY, 1863.
Printed at the "Times" Office- Louis Dupleix, Proprietor, Natchitoches, LA:, 1864
48pp, printed in English only [as issued]. Disbound, old institutional rubberstamp on blank portion of title page. Else Very Good., A scarce Confederate imprint, which the Times Office also issued in a more common version, with English and French on opposite pages. Much material on the prosecution of the War. Parrish & Willingham 2992 [1- LNHC only]. For the English-French printing see P&W 2991 [11 locations].

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Johnson, J.H.:
HOME AGAIN.
J.H. Johnson, Song Publisher, Stationer & Printer, Philadelphia:, [@1860]
Broadside, 6-1/4" x 9-1/2". Toned, couple of short tears repaired on verso. Good or so. Johnson conducted business in the 1860s and 1870s. Variant of Wolf #891.

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Mifflin, Thomas:
PRINTED DOCUMENT, COMPLETED IN MANUSCRIPT AND SIGNED BY PENNSYLVANIA GOVERNOR THOMAS MIFFLIN AND SECRETARY ALEXANDER DALLAS, APPOINTING LEWIS RUSH AS ENSIGN OF A LIGHT INFANTRY COMPANY BELONGING TO THE SECOND BATTALION OF MILITIA IN THE CITY & LIBERTIES OF PHILADELPHIA, MAY 4, 1791.
Francis Bailey. Philadelphia:,
15-1/4" x 13", paper seal of the State of Pennsylvania, elaborate typographic ornament; printed typescript with a variety of elegant type sizes and fonts. Signed beneath the seal, in the wide left margin, by Mifflin ['Tho. Mifflin']; and at the bottom by Dallas ['A.J. Dallas'] as Secretary. A few light fox marks. Several short fold separations repaired on blank verso, no text or manuscript loss. Very Good. Mifflin was a major general in the Continental Army, a member of the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly, a Continental Congressman from Pennsylvania, President of the Continental Congress, and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He served as Speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, President of the Pennsylvania Supreme Executive Council and as the first Governor of Pennsylvania. Dallas had a similarly star-spangled career: first Reporter of Decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of the Commonwealth of PA, U.S. Attorney for Eastern Pennsylvania, etc., etc.

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American Jewish Congress:
MEMORIALS SUBMITTED TO PRESIDENT WILSON CONCERNING THE STATUS OF THE JEWS OF EASTERN EUROPE, AND IN PALESTINE. BY REPRESENTATIVES OF THE AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS ON MARCH 2, 1919.
[2], 40 pp. Stapled as issued, and printed on rectos only. Bit of blank edge chipping [generously margined], Good+. On the "unhappy status of the Jews of Eastern Europe," and the hope that the ongoing Peace Conference will guarantee them "full civil, religious, political, and national rights."

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Tennessee:
PUBLIC ACTS OF THE STATE OF TENNESSEE, PASSED AT THE EXTRA SESSION 0F THE THIRTY-THIRD GENERAL ASSEMBLY, FOR THE YEAR 1861.
E.G. Eastman, Public Printers, Nashville, Tenn.:, 1861
viii, 127, [1 blank] pp. Later institutional cloth and old bookplate on front pastedown. Light rubberstamp on blank portion of title leaf, which is lightly dusted. Lacks free endpapers, else Very Good in later buckram. This Confederate Imprint leads with Governor Harris's Message of January 7, 1861, denouncing the North's "systematic, wanton, and long continued agitation of the slavery question," and its "actual and threatened aggressions." Deeply resentful of attempts to exclude slavery from the Western Territories, which were "acquired by the blood and treasure of all the States," he employs his oratory to swing sentiment to the Confederacy. But Tennessee did not secede until June 1861, the last State to leave the Union. West Tennessee heavily favored secession; East Tennessee was equally opposed. It came down to Middle Tennessee, which voted to cast the State's lot with the Confederacy. The Acts include a referendum on calling a Convention "to consider the then existing relations between the government of the United States and the government and people of the State of Tennessee." Resolution Number 14 proposes a convention of the slaveholding States for the purpose of amending the U.S. Constitution to guarantee the protection of slave property in all the Territories, and otherwise to protect the security of slavery. The State's detailed Militia Law is also printed. Parrish & Willingham 4129 [1- CA State Lib.]. Allen 5345 [2- TU, TKL-Mc]. OCLC 10721116 [11] as of March 2017.

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Currier & Ives:
THE OLD BULL DOG ON THE RIGHT TRACK.
Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St., New York:, [1864]
Lithograph broadside, 17-1/2" x 13-1/2". Minor blank corner wear. A scarce and imaginative political satire. Near Fine. "An election year cartoon measuring Democratic candidate McClellan's military failures against the recent successes of his successor, Ulysses S. Grant. At right Grant, portrayed as a bulldog wearing a collar labeled 'Lieut. General' and epaulets, sits pugnaciously on the tracks of the 'Weldon Railroad,' a Confederate supply route. He looks to Republican presidential incumbent Abraham Lincoln and boasts, 'I'm bound to take it.' Grant refers to the city of Richmond, here represented by a doghouse, in which cowers Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Davis, flanked by his own generals Lee (left) and Beauregard, remarks, 'You aint got this kennel yet old fellow!' Several other dogs hide behind the house. "At far left a dwarf-like McClellan asks the president, '. . . don't you think you had better call the old dog off now. I'm afraid he'll hurt those other dogs, if he catches hold of them.' Lincoln answers, 'Why little Mac thats the same pack of curs, that chased you aboard of the Gunboat two years ago, they are pretty nearly used up now. I think its best to give the old bull dog full swing to go in and finish them!' Lincoln refers to McClellan's failure to counterattack during the Battle of Malvern Hill in 1862... In contrast, Grant aggressively advanced his army toward Richmond, hoping to force a decisive battle" [Reilly]. Weitenkampf 142. Reilly 1864-18. OCLC 191120049 [4- AAS, Peabody-Essex, Clements, UNC] as of February 2017.

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[Free Soil Party]:
THE UTICA CONVENTION. VOICE OF NEW-YORK!! PROCEEDINGS OF THE UTICA CONVENTION, FEBRUARY 16, 1848, WITH THE SPEECHES OF JOHN VAN BUREN, GEORGE RATHBUN, &C. "FREE TRADE, FREE LABOR, FREE SOIL, FREE SPEECH AND FREE MEN."
Albany Atlas-Extra-, Albany:, February, 1848
32pp, stitched, printed in double columns. Caption title [as issued]. Very Good. This historic Convention, precursor to the Free Soil Party's nomination in June of Martin Van Buren, was chaired by his son John. It was a gathering of New York Democrats who opposed the Deep South's domination of their Party, after the Mexican Cession had brought the question of slavery in the territories to the forefront of national politics. Proclaiming that they will no longer be "the abettors of human slavery," the delegates praise the Wilmot Proviso, which would bar slavery from the new Territories; and they adopt a platform blending Free Soil principles with traditional Democratic stances favoring free trade and opposing monopolies and the national bank. FIRST EDITION. LCP 3054. Not in Sabin, Dumond, Blockson, Work, Weinstein. OCLC shows a number of institutional locations.

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Magnus, Charles:
LITHOGRAPH BIRD'S EYE VIEW, "WASHINGTON, D.C."
Charles Magnus, 12 Frankfort Street, New York:, [1860s]
Bird's-Eye View of the City, featuring the unfinished Washington Monument. The image is 4-1/2" x 7-1/2", on a lettersheet 11-3/4" x 9- 1/4". Untrimmed, chipped along blank edges. Else Very Good. Magnus is listed at 12 Frankfort St. in New York City directories for 1861 through 1867 [Pop Music Collection online site of Middle Tennessee State U.]. Although construction of the Washington Monument began in 1848, it was not completed until 1884. The image depicts the Monument as it was conceived, before final design and alterations.

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[Pearl Harbor]:
INVESTIGATION OF THE PEARL HARBOR ATTACK.
GPO, Washington:, 1946
Senate Document No. 244 (79th Congress, 2d Session). Octavo. xvi, 580pp. 3 folding maps. Complete as issued in the original publisher's cloth. Two ink stamps on the front free endpaper, else very good with no other markings. Boards moderately soiled. Very Good. The scarce final report, with the minority views of Homer Ferguson and Owen Brewster. FIRST EDITION.

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[Meigs, Josiah]:
THE NEW-HAVEN GAZETTE, AND THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE. (VOL. II.) THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, [1787]. NO. 27.
Josiah Meigs, New Haven:, 1787
4to. 8pp [(209)-216, as issued]. Disbound. Lightly foxed, Very Good. An interesting issue of this newspaper, printing an "Extract of a letter from his Excellency Governor Jefferson, Minister Plenipotentiary at Paris... to the Reverend President Stiles, dated Paris, September 1, 1786"; a discussion of questionable practices of tax collectors; a letter from 'A Countryman' on the insufficiency of funds to run the State government; a cure for The Flux; a detailed description of "the late hurricane at Wethersfield"; and a page and a half of advertisements. Jefferson's letter, among other subjects, speculates on the origins of the American Indians; he notes their "similitude" with "those of the eastern parts of Asia." He also discusses an improvement in the telescope and "a new method of copying" on copper plate.

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[Magee, John L.]:
THE CHAMPION OF DESPOTISM.
Uncolored lithograph broadside, drawn by Magee. 8-1/2" x 10-3/4". Near Fine copy of a rare item. "A satire critical of New York Courier & Enquirer editor James Watson Webb for his journalistic assaults on exiled Hungarian revolutionary leader Louis Kossuth. Weitenkampf dates the cartoon 1852, but it may have appeared as early as December 1851, when Kossuth landed in New York for a much-publicized visit to seek American diplomatic and financial support for Hungary" [Reilly]. Although most Americans sympathized with Kossuth's struggle for liberty, Webb did not approve of Kossuth's "attempts to embroil the United States in the European conflict" [id.]. As a top-hatted Kossuth strides down the street, a copy of Webb's newspaper [with headline 'Kossuth'] protruding from his back pocket, people remark unfavorably "on the man what wrote all that Stuf agin the Hungarians." Magee, the artist and lithographer, worked in New York City during this period, with an office at 34 Mott Street, where he produced this scarce lithograph. Reilly 52-2. Weitenkampf page 112. OCLC 299946275 [2- AAS, Lib. Cong.] as of February 2017.

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[Cooper, Thomas]:
THOUGHTS ON EMIGRATION, IN A LETTER FROM A GENTLEMAN IN PHILADELPHIA, TO HIS FRIEND IN ENGLAND.
[2], 17 pp, as issued. Mild toning, Very Good. In modern marbled wrappers, with printed title label pasted on front wrapper. Housed in an attractive quarter morocco slipcase. As a young adult in his native England, "Cooper was intimately involved in contemporary political issues. He became well-known as a lawyer of radical political sentiments." Warned "against seditious speech, Cooper visited the United States in 1793 to prepare a haven for English dissenters. Cooper and his family soon made their visit to the United States permanent by moving to Northumberland, Pennsylvania in 1794." ['Penn Biographies', online archives.upenn.edu]. Here he arranged for the anonymous publication of this pamphlet, encouraging emigration of persons seeking "asylum from civil persecution and religious intolerance"-- "opponents of the present government in England, as being inconsistent with the principles of liberty, and... opponents also of the slave- trade." Since most such prospective emigrants opposed slavery, he advises against settling in the Deep South and assures them that land and opportunity abound elsewhere. Cooper examines advantages and disadvantages of all the States-- focusing particularly on economic opportunity, slavery, climate, land costs, and amenities. Eberstadt summarizes: "Describes the respective merits of lands and inducements to settlement in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky. The latter two territories, while offering many advantages, are deemed unsafe because of the frequent Indian incursions." Cooper concludes that his own Pennsylvania [where, perhaps not coincidentally, he had recently purchased several hundred thousand acres] is the best. FIRST EDITION. 123 Eberstadt 39. Sabin 95678. ESTC N46500. OCLC records nine locations under several accession numbers as of February 2017.

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Dowell, B.F.:
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF OREGON. B.F. DOWELL, PLAINTIFF, VS. W.C. GRISWOLD, DEFENDANT. ACTION AT LAW. MOTION FOR A NEW TRIAL. BEFORE HON. STEPHEN J. FIELD, JUSTICE OF THE U.S. SUPREME COURT, AND HON. MATTHEW P. DEADY, U.S. DISTRICT JUDGE. AUGUST TERM, 1877. BRIEF AND ARGUMENT OF B.F. DOWELL... PLAINTIFF'S ATTORNEYS.
Printed at the Oregon Sentinel Office, Jacksonville, Oregon:, 1877
68, [1], [3 blanks] pp. Stitched in original printed front title wrapper [spine wrapper chipped, rubberstamp of 'B.F. Dowell, Attorney, Portland, Or. Jun 10 1889'. Good+. Dowell argued that "An Attorney and Claim Agent has a lien on moneys in the U.S. Treasury appropriated to pay Oregon-Indian War Scrip, of 1854 and 1855-6; and that the Defendant obtained the money appropriated to pay certain claims by fraud." Material is printed on the Oregon Indian wars of the 1850s.

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Forney, J[ohn] W.:
TO THE PEOPLE OF THE SOUTH. THE DAILY, SUNDAY AND WEEKLY WASHINGTON CHRONICLE.
Printed Broadsheet, 7-5/8" x 9-5/8". Old horizontal folds, Very Good. Forney was a Pennsylvania publisher, a journalist, and a Democrat who broke with his friend James Buchanan over the Kansas-Nebraska issue. Appleton says, "Few men in the country contributed more than Mr. Forney to strengthen the Republican party, and to prepare it for the contest of 1860." He published the Chronicle throughout the War, and was a friend and ally of President Lincoln. Now, the War over, Forney appeals to southerners to subscribe to his newspaper. "One of the habits of the old party leaders was to exclude from the people of the South... all varieties of books and newspapers that ventured to discuss the delicate subject of human servitude, and its manifold incidental relations...It is the duty of all the people of the Republic to address themselves to the new condition of things." He looks forward to "the revival of commerce between the late separated States," and "the rebuilding and equipping of the great lines of travel and transportation." The great hope for binding the formerly warring States together is Forney's "public journal established at and speaking from the National Capitol, capable of discussing vital questions with magnanimity and fairness, and dedicated to a practical restoration of lasting good relations between North and South." Forney has "intimate connections with some of the foremost men of the contending parties." He was a conciliator between the sections until the onset of war, a supporter of Stephen Douglas and opponent of Breckinridge. "All matters of interest to the Southern people will be carefully collected, arranged and discussed in these columns." Not located on OCLC as of March 2017.

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[Thomas, Isaiah] [George, Daniel]:
THOMAS'S MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, RHODE-ISLAND, NEWHAMPSHIRE & VERMONT ALMANACK, WITH AN EPHEMERIS, FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1791.
Isaiah Thomas, Sold by him in Worcester...and at the Boston Bookstore; and by other Booksellers in Boston, Worcester:, [1794]
[48] pp. Stitched. Blank outer margins wormed, light foxing. Woodcuts. Good+. "Nichols... says that the Thomas almanacs from 1791 to 1794 were calculated by Daniel George" [NAIP]. In addition to the usual, this Almanac prints an excerpt from Franklin's 'Way to Wealth,' an article on 'The Symptoms and Cure of the Vapours', a 'Table of Rates at which Dollars pass in the American States,' tables of interest, "A Table for Buying or Selling any Commodity by the Great Hundred, which is 112 Pounds,' and a table of roads and distances. Evans 22537. Drake 3458. NAIP w029838.

Price: $350.00
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Rawson, Jonathan:
A COMPENDIUM OF MILITARY DUTY, ADAPTED FOR THE MILITIA OF THE UNITED STATES; IN THREE PARTS... THE FIRST EDITION. THE SAFETY AND SECURITY OF A STATE DEPENDS UPON THE DISCIPLINE OF ITS MILITIA.
Elpihalet Ladd, for the Subscribers..., Dover (N.H.):, 1793
ix, [1 blank], [11]-240, 251-305, [1 blank] pp, as issued with pagination errors [text complete]. Contemporary tree calf, spine rubbed, front hinge starting. Text Very Good. Contemporary inscription on front free endpaper: "Samuel Emerson's to John Barrell." Rawson had been Aide de Camp to General John Sullivan during the Revolution. In 1779 Sullivan led a brutal campaign against the Iroquois in western New York; soon thereafter he was forced into retirement , but he would serve as New Hampshire's governor from 1786-1789. Rawson's book, dedicated to Anthony Wayne, is a comprehensive, early American military manual. Drawing upon his own experiences, as well as those of von Steuben, Field Marshall Count Saxe, and the Chevalier de la Valiere, he presents the work in three parts: 1. The Duty of Soldiers in General; 2. The Manoeuvers and Evolutions of the Infantry, Artillery, and Cavalry; 3. Some Particular Instructions to Officers of the Partizan Corps. The Appendix contains the text of the 1792 Militia Act. Samuel Emerson [1764-1851] was a medical doctor born in New Hampshire. He graduated from Harvard in 1785, settled in Kennebunk, Maine, around 1790, and married Maine native Olive Barrell in 1791. John Barrell [1776-1867] was Olive's brother. Evans 26054. NAIP w011902. Not in Nicholson.

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Dalby, Francis:
MR. DALBY'S CASE.
3, [1] pp. Folded folio sheet. Light foxing and horizontal folds, Very Good. Docketed in type on final page, "The Case of Francis Dalby of London, Merchant. Humbly submitted to the Honourable House of Commons of Great Britain." An interesting illustration of the British government's power to seize private property without paying just compensation. This is a rare "petition addressed to the House of Commons, requesting compensation for the hiring for public service of certain ships owned by Francis Dalby and his father-in-law, Charles Weekes" [ESTC]. Dalby owned the Ship Britannia. In 1743 it sailed from the Isle of Wight with a cargo of wheat, bound for Italy. The British fleet stopped it, seized its cargo for use of the fleet, and used the ship "as a tender in his Majesty's service"-- all without compensation to Dalby. Several other Dalby ships met a similar fate: one was engaged in the Carolina rice trade, another in the West Indian trade. Having "solicited and prosecuted all the means in their power to procure a reasonable satisfaction for the heavy losses," Dalby appeals to "the lenity, justice and beneficent aid of this Honourable House, without which the said Dalby and his family must inevitably be ruined." ESTC T144865. OCLC 558667268 [1- British Lib.] as of February 2017.

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Dwight, Timothy:
THE FOLLY, GUILT, AND MISCHIEFS OF DUELLING; A SERMON, PREACHED IN THE COLLEGE CHAPEL AT NEW HAVEN, ON THE SABBATH PRECEDING THE ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT, SEPTEMBER, 1804. BY... PRESIDENT OF YALE-COLLEGE.
Hudson and Goodwin, Hartford:, 1805
30pp, but lacking the half title. Untrimmed, removed, Good+. Dwight's sermon is prefaced by a denial that it was a response to the widely publicized Hamilton-Burr duel. "Whatever may be thought of a late encounter, which has engrossed the attention of this country, it is especially to be remarked, that I do not intend to refer to it at all." Though striving for the big picture, Dwight would probably have conceded that, but for that duel, few would have listened. Dwight takes his text from Proverbs: "A man that doeth violence to the blood of any person, shall flee to the pit; let no man stay him." Ford, Hamiltoniana 114*.

Price: $175.00
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Hoffman, Martin; Hone, Philip; Dunham, David:
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY A COMMITTEE REPRESENTING NEW YORK CITY AUCTIONEERS, TO T.K. JONES & CO., A PROMINENT BOSTON AUCTION FIRM, SEEKING ITS AID IN LOBBYING AGAINST LEGISLATION TAXING AUCTION SALES: "NEW YORK 19 DEC. 1817
Folio leaf folded to 7 1/4" x 9". [2], [1 blank], [1-address] pp. Light tanning, old folds, small tear at main fold from opening wax seal [most letters of the word 'Baltimore' are lost], small 2" x 3" rectangle cut from blank leaf [no text loss]. Addressed on final page with red date stamp "NEW YORK DEC 19." Paper watermarked "1812." Signed in ink by Martin Hoffman, Philip Hone and David Dunham. Good+ to Very Good. Three men representing four New York City auction houses write to Boston auctioneer T.K. Jones & Co., seeking its aid in avoiding duties on auction sales. The signers-- Martin Hoffman, Philip Hone, and David Dunham-- are a "Committee of Correspondence" in contact with "our Brethren" in Providence, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. Auction houses and established retail merchants were, in many respects, competitors. Merchants resented auctioneers' disruption of their retail markets; auctioneers, on the other hand, argued that they contributed to market efficiency and hence the public good. Retailers lobbied for Congress and local governments to impose taxes and other burdens on auctioneers to diminish the latter's competitive advantages. Philip Hone (1780-1851), later a Mayor of New York City, was a partner in one of the most successful auction firms in New York City. In 1795, Martin Hoffman founded the auction and commission house of Hoffman & Seaton which, by the time of this letter, had been renamed Hoffman & Glass. David Dunham was a partner of Matthew L. Davis in the auction firm of Dunham & Davis. Davis was the friend and biographer of Aaron Burr. [Barrett, The Old Merchants of New York City. Second Series. New York, 1863.] Thomas Kilby Jones [c.1758-1841], the founder of T.K. Jones & Co., was one of the leading Boston auctioneers for 40 years, as well as a merchant, trustee and vice-president of the Massachusetts Fire Society, and trustee of the Roxbury Latin School.

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[Indiana]:
DELAWARE COUNTY, INDIANA, PUBLIC SCHOOLS/ COMMON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT/ THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT IRA KAIN HAVING COMPLETED THE COMMON SCHOOL COURSE OF STUDY PRESCRIBED BY THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF DELAWARE COUNTY, INDIANA IN HAMILTON TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS, MERITS THIS DIPLOMA./ IN WITNESS WHEREOF, THE SEAL OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION AND THE SIGNATURES OF THE COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT, TRUSTEE AND TEACHER OF DISTRICT NO. NINE ARE HEREUNTO AFFIXED THIS SEVENTY FIFTH DAY OF MAY, 1899. / [signed] JOHN WATSON, TEACHER; TOM CAMPBELL, TRUSTEE; AND CHAS. A. VAN MATRE, COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT.
Large broadside, 19" x 23 1/2". Black and white printed document completed in ink manuscript. Elegant typesettings, large decorative education related emblems with a picture at the center depicting an oil lamp atop a pile of books with a globe in the background, with ribbons, ivy and birds interwoven. All is set within an ornate border. Signed in ink by John Watson, Teacher; Tom Campbell, Trustee; and Chas. A. Van Matre, County Superintendent. Gold foil seal of the Delaware County Public Schools. Uniformly tanned, light dustsoiling. Else, Very Good. Ira Edward Kain [1882-1925] was born in Delaware County, Indiana, to Oliver P. Kain and Mary J. Schideler Kain. He spent his life in Delaware County, working as a farmer in the town of Shideler, marrying Oletha Wingate in 1902, and then moving in the nearby town of Albany. Charles A. Van Matre [1869-1931], a native of Delaware County, began teaching at the age of 18, took two years off to attend state college, and then returned to the profession. He was elcted the County Superintendent of Schools in 1897. He was hailed in his obituary as "the father of the consolidated school system in Indiana" due to his many years dedicated to construction of modern school buildings in central lcoations. In addition to his many years as superintendent, he was also active in Republican Politics, served as president of the Indiana State Teachers' Association, was a member of the Delaware County Bar, and member of the Delaware Masonic Lodge, the Knights of Piythias, and the Odd Fellows. [The Indianapolis News, July 20, 1931, p.15.]

Price: $75.00
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[Webb, Thomas H.]:
ORGANIZATION, OBJECTS, AND PLAN OF OPERATIONS, OF THE EMIGRANT AID COMPANY: ALSO A DESCRIPTION OF KANSAS. FOR THE INFORMATION OF EMIGRANTS. FOURTH EDITION, WITH ADDITIONS.
Alfred Mudge & Son, Boston:, 1854
24pp. Bound into contemporary marbled boards and lightly worn. Manuscript note at head of title: "Nov. 25, 1854. Gift of Thos. H. Webb." Good+. "The Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company was one of a number of organizations formed in the New England states to foster settlement of the newly organized Kansas Territory by northerners who would be opposed to slavery and would vote to exclude that 'Peculiar Institution' from the proposed state constitution" [Wagner-Camp]. Pages 9-18, plus the first three lines of page 19, print George Park's "Notes of a Trip Up Kanzas River, Including Observations on the Soil, Climate, Scenery, &c." The Company offers a fifty dollar prize for the "Best Song for Kanzas Emigrants." Webb was the Organization's Secretary. Howes W192. Graff 4563. Wagner-Camp 240c [noting the first through third editions, all printed in 1854]. Sabin 22474. Dary 5.

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[Connecticut Western Reserve]:
WHEREAS AT A GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, HOLDEN AT NEW-HAVEN, ON THE SECOND THURSDAY OF OCTOBER, 1796, AN ACT WAS PASSED FOR INCORPORATING THE PROPRIETORS OF THE HALF MILLION ACRES OF LAND, LYING SOUTH OF LAKE ERIE, WHICH ACT IMPOWERED THE AGENTS OF SAID PROPRIETORS IN GENERAL MEETING ASSEMBLED, TO LAY TAXES ON SAID PROPRIETORS, AND TO APPOINT THE TIMES WHEN PAYABLE; AND ALSO IMPOWERED THE COLLECTORS OF SAID PROPRIETORS TO MAKE SALE OF THE RIGHTS OF SUCH PARTS THEREOF, AS SHOULD BE SUFFICIENT TO DISCHARGE THE TAX OR TAXES, WHICH THE PROPRIETOR OR PROPRIETORS OF RIGHTS MIGHT NEGLECT OR REFUSE TO PAY...
Printed folio broadside, 7-3/8" x 12-1/4", completed in manuscript and docketed in manuscript on verso. Old folds, light foxing, else Very Good. An evidently unrecorded document on Connecticut claims to the Western Reserve, not located on ESTC, OCLC, or NAIP as of March 2017. "A general meeting of the agents of said proprietors, held at Hartford, on the 17th May, 1797", established a schedule of taxes. But Frances Bradley of Fairfield, failed to pay. Thus, on January 15, 1798, her property was sold for the amount of unpaid taxes, to Walter Terry of Fairfield. Lothrop Lewis of Fairfield, the tax collector, here officially transfers the property to Terry. His deed, dated March 30, 1799, is acknowledged on April 5, 1799. Lothrop Lewis, whose name is printed, also signs in ink; witnesses were Lewis Sturges and Samuel Rowland. In 1786 Connecticut relinquished claims to land west of Pennsylvania except for the Western Reserve, a portion of what is now south of Lake Erie in northeast Ohio. Connecticut assigned some of the Reserve to its citizens as compensation for losses suffered during the Revolution; and sold the rest to a consortium of Connecticut men, including Moses Cleaveland, who had formed the Connecticut Land Company. Their speculations were not successful, there being no effective local government in the Reserve capable of unraveling the tangle of land titles. Thus taxes imposed were frequently not collected. To force payment of the tax, on January 15, 1798 Lothrop Lewis conducted the sales. [Carpenter: ORIGIN AND LOCATION OF THE FIRELANDS OF THE WESTERN RESERVE, Ohio Archeological and Historical Quarterly, Volume 44, April, 1935, page180.] Lothrop [a/k/a Lathrop] Lewis [1759-1817], born in Fairfield, was its tax collector for many years. Lewis B[urr] Sturges [1763-1844], born in Fairfield, graduated from Yale, was clerk of the Probate Court from 1787 to 1791, a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from 1794 to 1803; and a Federalist Congressman from 1805 to 1816. He spent his later years in Ohio. Samuel Rowland [1769-1837] was born in Fairfield, admitted to the bar in 1794, was a lawyer and town clerk for 42 years, and turnpike surveyor to the New York State line. [Perry: THE OLD BURYING GROUND OF FAIRFIELD, CONN., A MEMORIAL OF MANY OF THE EARLY SETTLERS OF FAIRFIELD... 1882, p.164.]

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Aufrer, Anthony:
THE CANNIBALS' PROGRESS; OR THE DREADFUL HORRORS OF FRENCH INVASION, AS DISPLAYED BY THE REPUBLICAN OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS, IN THEIR PERFIDY, RAPACITY, FEROCIOUSNESS AND BRUTALITY, EXERCISED TOWARDS THE INNOCENT INHABITANTS OF GERMANY. TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN.
Hudson & Goodwin, Hartford:, 1798
32pp, stitched. Light foxing, uniform toning. Good+. With a title page cut by Wm Wabsworth [i.e., Wadsworth] of French troops killing innocent civilians. This is one of eleven American printings of an intemperate Francophobic work, all issuing in 1798, the highwater mark of America's quasi-War with France. "Not a trace of decency, not the least regard to religion and its customs, appeared in the conduct of the French soldiery... The most brutal actions and the greatest excesses were committed..." Evans 33329. Trumbull 485.

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Marsh, Ebenezer Grant:
AN ORATION, ON THE TRUTH OF THE MOSAIC HISTORY OF THE CREATION; DELIVERED AT NEW-HAVEN, ON THE PUBLIC COMMENCEMENT, SEPTEMBER, A. D. 1798.
59pp, disbound. Closed horizontal tear at one leaf [no loss]. Good+. With learned and detailed footnotes, a survey of the creation myths of all cultures, to demonstrate "their inconsistencies and absurdities, and...the truth of the Mosaic history." FIRST EDITION. Evans 34047. Singerman 0121. Trumbull 1097.

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Macclintock, Samuel:
THE CHOICE: A DISCOURSE, OCCASIONED BY THE PRESENT SEVERE DROUGHT; THE MORTAL FEVER WHICH PREVAILS IN PORTSMOUTH, IN THIS NEAR VICINITY, AND IN MANY OF OUR CAPITAL, SEA-PORT TOWNS; AND THE THREATENING PROSPECT OF A CALAMITOUS WAR WITH A POWERFUL NATION. DELIVERED AT GREENLAND, SEPT. 9, 1798.
Thomas Adams, Boston:, 1798
21, [1 blank] pp, but lacking the half title and final blank leaf. One short margin tear [no loss]. some loosening. Good+. On the fever, Macclintock counsels, "The same sins are found in the midst of us, which have brought ruin on other nations in ages past. And may we not expect that these sins, persisted in, will finally bring ruin upon us...?" The French, with whom we are at the brink of war, "have long been considered as the model of politeness and humanity to all Europe, yet...they have committed such acts of savage barbarity as are a disgrace to human nature." The British army is no better. FIRST EDITION. Evans 34031.

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[Democratic Party of Portage County, Ohio]:
TO THE ELECTORS OF PORTAGE COUNTY.
Broadsheet. 17" x 20", printed in six columns on recto, one column plus a few lines on verso. Several fold splits and repairs, with a few words and letters lost in several places. Several fox marks. Good. The broadsheet expresses the position of the Democratic Executive Central Committee of Portage County at Ravenna, on the issues of the day, dated in type August 30, 1842. The Committee members were Joseph Lyman, John Gillis, D.P. Rhodes, E. Spalding, Samuel Mason, William Coolman, Jr., H.M. Campbell, Hugh Lowrey, and A. Servoss. Also printed is an "Address of the Democratic Members of the Ohio Legislature to the People of the State." Both indict the Whigs for "A series of most extraordinary events which have resulted in the overthrow and annihilation of Representative Government in Ohio," i.e., the mass resignation of Whig members from the legislature. Whigs are accused of "mass revolution," "treason against the State," and similar offenses. Not located on OCLC as of January 2017, or the online site of the Library of Congress.

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[Reconstruction]:
AN ACT TO RELIEVE CERTAIN PERSONS THEREIN NAMED FROM THE LEGAL AND POLITICAL DISABILITIES IMPOSED BY THE FOURTEENTH AMENDMENT OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.
IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES. H.R. 1880, [Washington]:, February 16, 18
40th Cong., 3d Session. 6, [1 blank], [1- docketed in print] pp. 7-1/2" x 11". Caption title, as issued. A few fox spots, Very Good. Each line of the Bill is numbered. The Fourteenth Amendment barred from federal or State office any pre-War office-holder who had betrayed his oath to support the U.S. Constitution by joining the Confederacy. This Bill "Passed the House of Representatives February 16, 1869." It was then delivered to the Senate, which made a few amendments, adding a few and subtracting a few miscreant Confederates; it then passed its own version. The two Chambers were unable to agree on a final bill; it languished as the Session ended on March 3, 1869. The Bill's legislative progression and demise are reported in the Congressional Globe for the 40th Congress, 3d Session, pages 277, 357-359, 335-336, 374; and, finally, on various pages March 3, 1869.

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Smith, Ashbel:
AN ADDRESS DELIVERED IN THE CITY OF GALVESTON ON THE 22D OF FEBRUARY, 1848, THE ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH DAY OF WASHINGTON, AND OF THE BATTLE OF BUENA VISTA.
News Office. W. Richardson, Publisher, Galveston:, 1848
17, [3 blanks] pp. Stitched in original printed green wrappers. Light foxing, Very Good. In an attractive, modern quarter morocco slipcase, with gilt-lettered spine. The Handbook of Texas gives Smith some serious respect, calling this Surgeon General of the Texan Army and Yale graduate "the father of Texas medicine" and "the father of the University of Texas." The Address commemorates the success of American soldiers and "their veteran commander, General Zachary Taylor, whose generalship had been proved on many a triumphant battle field." The Americans were outnumbered at the Battle of Buena Vista. "The squadrons of Santa Anna, so full of confidence in the morning, had been broken and repulsed; under cover of the night they fled for safety... At Buena Vista was annihilated the military power of Mexico in the north-eastern provinces of that country." Smith lauds President Polk, the righteousness of American arms, and American war aims. He denounces "betrayers of the country" who deny the American claim to Texas, and who assert that Polk commenced the war unconstitutionally. His enthusiastic affirmation of Manifest Destiny rejoices in the freedom guaranteed by American institutions. "The Mexican war is a part of the mission, of the destiny allotted to the Anglo Saxon race on this continent. It is our destiny, our mission to civilize, to Americanize this continent." Smith emphasizes the immense importance of California to the United States; and the need to thwart British efforts to "hem in our Pacific territory, and control the two great thoroughfares of the overland trade." Winkler 57. Tutorow 4086. Raines 189. Not in Rader.

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Smith, Whitefoord:
THE SUBSTANCE OF AN ADDRESS DELIVERED TO THE PALMETTO REGIMENT, SOUTH CAROLINA VOLUNTEERS, ON SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1846, BY THE REV. WHITEFOORD SMITH, [PUBLISHED BY REQUEST.].
Caption title [as issued], 4pp. Disbound, else Very Good. Reverend Smith was a South Carolina Methodist, and one of the South's foremost apologists for Slavery. In this rare Address he tells the Palmetto Regiment, as it prepares to leave for Mexico and war, "You have been invoked to preserve inviolate the standards which have been presented to you, and to exhibit that intrepidity and gallantry for which South Carolina has ever been distinguished." The soldiers should, he says, act like Christians in performing their duty. They will demonstrate that "the volunteer force" will sustain the Nation and that a standing army "is not absolutely necessary to the protection of its rights." FIRST EDITION. Not in Turnbull, Sabin, Haferkorn, Tutorow, Decker, Eberstadt, NUC, LCP. OCLC locates three copies, under two accession numbers [Duke, UNC, USC], as of January 2017.

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[Philadelphia]:
REPORT OF A COMMITTEE OF THE SELECT COUNCIL OF PHILADELPHIA. READ NOVEMBER 10TH. 1796.
Printed by Zachariah Poulson, Junior, Philadelphia:, 1796
24pp. Stitched and untrimmed. Outer untrimmed margins with some light wear, minor foxing. Contemporary plain rear wrapper present. Very Good. The Report is a rare analysis of the municipal infrastructure of Philadelphia and the financing necessary for performing City services. It is an informative, detailed picture of the necessities of eighteenth century America's leading City. The Committee members were John Connelly, Samuel Mickle Fox, and John Bleakley. They sign in type on page 17. Municipal receipts-- from taxes, fines, rentals of city property-- are used for "Lighting and watching the city": 718 lamps are lighted under specific schedules, at enumerated costs; 23 watchmen, whose "routes, and the times of crying the hour are prescribed to them by the Commissioners." Funds are used for "Paving and repairing old pavements." The work involved, with its costs, is enumerated. "Cleaning the streets" is also a municipal function, "so essential to the health of the citizens." The city must clean the "filth" and "manure," costing "the city annually a considerable sum." The 300 "public pumps and wells," and the need for more of them, require maintenance and planning. Various properties owned by the City are let to private parties in exchange for rent. These include market stalls, wharves, the Schuylkill ferry and bridge, the Potter's-field. Procedures for determining and recording city receipts and expenses are delineated. Two tables, at pages 18 and 19, print the City's receipts and expenses for June 1789 through each subsequent year. An analysis of City property appears at pages 20-24, and is signed in type at the end by George Roberts and Samuel Mickle Fox. Evans 30996. ESTC w6143 [4- AAS, JCB, Lib. Co. U Penn.].

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[Parliament]:
FOURTEEN PARLIAMENTARY REPORTS CONCERNING BRITISH-AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS DURING THE CIVIL WAR.
Each document folio, 8-1/2" x 13-1/2". Stitched, except as noted; light wear, each with inoffensive rubberstamping. Except as noted, Very Good. A. CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE UNITED STATES' GOVERNMENT RESPECTING THE SUSPENSION OF THE FEDERAL CUSTOM-HOUSE AT THE PORT OF CHARLESTON. London: 1861. [2], 4, [1 blank], [1] pp. B. EXTRACT OF A DESPATCH FROM LORD LYONS RESPECTING POLITICAL ARRESTS IN THE UNITED STATES. London: 1862. [4]pp. C. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 7. PAPERS RELATING TO THE IMPRISONMENT OF MR. SHAVER AT FORT WARREN, IN BOSTON HARBOR. London: 1862. [2], 9. [1] pp. D. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 10. (1863.) EXTRACT FROM A DESPATCH TO MR. STUART, HER MAJESTY'S CHARGE D'AFFAIRES AT WASHINGTON, RESPECTING THE SEIZURE OF MAIL-BAGS ON BOARD THE "ADELA." London: 1863. [4]pp. E. DESPATCH RESPECTING THE CIVIL WAR IN NORTH AMERICA. London: 1863. [2], 2, [1 blank] [1] pp. F. NORTH AMERICA. NO, 6. (1863.) CORRESPONDENCE WITH MR. ADAMS RESPECTING NEUTRAL RIGHTS AND DUTIES. London: 1863. [2], 6, [1 blank], [1] pp. G. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 15. (1864.) PAPERS RESPECTING THE ARREST AND IMPRISONMENT OF MR. JAMES MCHUGH IN THE UNITED STATES. London: 1864. [2], 17, [1] pp. Paper is brittle, disbound, Good only. H. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 18. (1864.) FURTHER PAPERS RESPECTING THE ARREST AND IMPRISONMENT OF MR. JAMES MCHUGH IN THE UNITED STATES. London: 1864. [2], 6, [1 blank], [1] pp. I. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 17. (1864.) CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING THE ENLISTMENT OF BRITISH SUBJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY. London: 1864. [2], 59, [1] pp. J. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 19. (1864.) FURTHER CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING THE ENLISTMENT OF BRITISH SUBJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES' ARMY. London: 1864. [2], 4, [2] pp. K. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 2. (1864.) CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING THE CAPTURE OF THE "SAXON" BY THE UNITED STATES' SHIP "VANDERBILT." London: 1864. [2], 43, [1] pp. L. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 11. (1864.). RETURN OF CLAIMS OF BRITISH SUBJECTS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES' GOVERNMENT FROM THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE CIVIL WAR TO THE 31ST OF MARCH, 1864. London: 1864. [2], 18 pp. Pages brittle. Disbound, Good only. M. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 19. (1864.) FURTHER CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING THE CESSATION OF CIVIL WAR IN NORTH AMERICA. London: 1865. [2], 4, [2] pp. N. NORTH AMERICA. NO. 2. (1865.) FURTHER CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING BRITISH AND AMERICAN CLAIMS ARISING OUT OF THE LATE CIVIL WAR. London: 1867. [2], 3, [1] pp. The Reports present an overview of British-American frictions during the Civil War, with issues ranging from activities on the high seas, drafting of alleged British nationals into the Union armed and naval forces, arrests and other matters, all handled with exquisite skill by Lord Russell, Secretary of State Seward, and others.

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[Atomic Energy]:
THE EFFECTS OF ATOMIC WEAPONS. PREPARED FOR AND IN COOPERATION WITH THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND THE U.S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY
Original printed wrappers. x, 456 pp. Photo illustrations, graphs, and charts. Light shelf wear, Very Good. The Civil Defense Office "commends this publication as a source of scientific information for technical personnel engaged in civil defense planning activities. Its detailed description of the physical phenomena associated with atomic explosions provides certain basic data helpful in the preparation of practical plans for atomic warfare defense." The book treats the "principles of an atomic explosion," its physical damage, radiation and incendiary effects, decontamination, radiation sickness, genetic effects of radiation, protection of personnel. OCLC locates four copies as of January 2017, under two accession numbers.

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Youle, Joseph:
AN INAUGURAL DISSERTATION ON RESPIRATION: BEING AN APPLICATION OF THE PRINCIPLES OF THE NEW CHEMISTRY TO THAT FUNCTION. SUBMITTED TO THE PUBLIC EXAMINATION OF THE FACULTY OF PHYSIC, UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE TRUSTEES OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE IN THE STATE OF NEW-YORK: WILLIAM SAMUEL JOHNSON, LL.D. PRESIDENT; FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHYSIC; ON THE THIRTIETH DAY OF APRIL, 1793. BY JOSEPH YOULE, CITIZEN OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK.
Printed by T. and J. Swords, Printers to the Faculty of Physic of Columbia College, New York:, 1793
39, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, Very Good. Inscribed in ink on page [4]: "Docr. Paul Micheau from his Friend The Author." Dr. Micheau was a founding member of the Medical Society of Essex County, New Jersey, and a member of the Medical Society of New Jersey. He also founded a Medical School at Elizabeth in 1790. Youle died in 1795. Evans 26520. Austin 2102.

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[Magnus, Charles]:
SEVEN UNUSED POSTAL COVERS, DEPICTING FEMALE ALLEGORICAL FIGURES ON THE LEFT, THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTE AT THE TOP RIGHT CORNER OF EACH.
Charles Magnus, New York:, [1861-1867]
Each cover is 3" x 5-1/2", with Magnus's address listed as 12 Frankfort St., N.Y. "Charles Magnus is listed at 12 Frankfort St. in New York City directories for 1861 through 1867" [Pop Music Collection online site of Middle Tennessee State U.]. a. Full color cover depicting an allegorical figure of a female carrying grains while wearing a red skirt, white shirt and blue sash. Name and address of Magnus printed beneath the illustration. A picture of the Smithsonian institute in pink with blue sky and green grass at top right corner with the words "Smithsonian Institute" printed beneath it. Glue remnants on flap side from having been mounted. Else Very Good. b. Cover printed in green ink depicting an allegorical figure of a female carrying grains on the left. Name and address of Magnus printed beneath the illustration. A picture of the Smithsonian institute at top right corner with the words "Smithsonian Institute" printed beneath it. Some shadowing along flaps from remnants of adhesive. Very Good. Variation of Winterthur Accession #71x021.29, which uses purple ink. c. Cover printed in purple ink depicting an allegorical figure of a female holding a sickle in her left hand at her hip, her right hand full of grains overhead. Name and address of Magnus printed beneath the illustration. A picture of the Smithsonian institute at top right corner with the words "Smithsonian Institute" printed beneath it. Some shadowing along flaps from remnants of adhesive. Very Good. d. Cover printed in purple ink depicting an allegorical figure of a female sitting upon a rock surrounded by a few shells and holding a trident in her hand. Name and address of Magnus printed beneath the illustration. A picture of the Smithsonian institute at top right corner with the words "Smithsonian Institute" printed beneath it. Some shadowing along flaps from remnants of adhesive. Very Good. e. Cover printed in purple ink depicting an allegorical figure of a female standing and holding American flag by her side, a Union shield is surrounded by large leaves; eagle stands perched with its wings held in the air. Name and address of Magnus printed beneath the illustration. A picture of the Smithsonian institute at top right corner with the words "Smithsonian Institute" printed beneath it. Some shadowing along flaps from remnants of adhesive. Very Good. f. Cover printed in purple ink depicting an allegorical figure wearing a flowing dress and holding flowers in her outstretched hand. Name and address of Magnus printed beneath the illustration. A picture of the Smithsonian institute at top right corner with the words "Smithsonian Institute" printed beneath it. Some shadowing along flaps from remnants of adhesive. Else Very Good. Winterthur Accession # 71x022.339. g. Cover printed in purple ink depicting a small vignette of two women sitting while another stands and reads to them from a large book. Name and address of Magnus printed beneath the illustration. A picture of the Smithsonian institute at top right corner with the words "Smithsonian Institute" printed beneath it. Some shadowing along flaps from remnants of adhesive. Very Good.

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[Douglas, John]:
SEASONABLE HINTS FROM AN HONEST MAN ON THE PRESENT IMPORTANT CRISIS OF A NEW REIGN AND A NEW PARLIAMENT.
Printed for A. Millar, in the Strand, London:, 1761
[2], 62 pp, as issued. Disbound, first two leaves with a stain and chip to blank inner margin. Good+. The author warns the new King "not to resign himself to the insolent pretensions of any confederacy of ministers" or "grasping courtiers." He warns against "a cabal of ministers" who seek to disturb England's tripartite division of power by "erecting themselves into a fourth estate, to check, to controul, to influence, nay, to enslave the other three." ESTC T47257.

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Dana, James:
A CENTURY DISCOURSE, DELIVERED AT THE ANNIVERSARY MEETING OF THE FREEMEN OF THE TOWN OF WALLINGFORD, APRIL 9, 1770.
Printed by T. and S. Green, New-Haven:, [1770]
51, [1 blank] pp, but lacking the half title. Broken stitching, two institutional rubberstamps [one a 'duplicate' notation]. Good+. Dana was pastor of the First Church in Wallingford. The cause of celebration: "That we have compleated 100 years since the incorporation of this town by the General Assembly of the colony." His Discourse reviews the early history of New Haven and Wallingford. He explains that "our first settlers" came from New Haven; Dana thus discusses New Haven's founding in 1638, the establishment of the first church there in 1639, the enactment of "a civil constitution," and its history through about 1670. The history of Wallingford then begins. Dana describes the "repeated incursions of the barbarians", that is, the Indians, in particular "Philip, youngest son of Massasoit," who sought to unite the New England Indians "against the English." The "extirpation of the savages" reflects the "divine goodness in freeing us from the enemy of the wilderness, and from an insidious foe." Evans 11622. Trumbull 540.

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Spence, Thomas:
MANITOBA ET LE NORT-OUEST DU CANADA, SES RESSOURCES ET SES AVANTAGES POUR L'EMIGRANT ET LE CAPITALISTE, COMPARES AUX ETATS AMERICAINS DE L-OUEST...
Publie par le Departement D'Agriculture, Ottawa:, 1875
Original printed front wrapper, stitched. 39, [1 blank] pp. Folding lithographed 'Map of Canada and Part of the United States, 1874' [with rail routes]. Light foxing throughout, with wrapper chipped along spine and blank corners. Good+. At head of title: 'Seconde Edition Revisee et Augmentee.' The pamphlet, preceded by the 1874 printing in French, was also printed in English. It touts Manitoba's advantages over the American West and Northwest. Spence urges that greater attention be paid to this Province, which is ripe for commercial activity now that the Canadian Pacific Railway is opening up the area. Sabin 89291.

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Avery, David:
TWO SERMONS ON THE NATURE AND EVIL OF PROFESSORS OF RELIGION NOT BRIDLING THE TONGUE.
Joseph Bumstead, Boston:, 1791
66pp. Disbound with light foxing. Good+. Reverend Avery counsels, "The evil of not bridling the tongue is a very serious subject." Evans 23137.

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Virginia:
JOURNAL OF THE CONVENTION OF VIRGINIA; HELD IN THE CITY OF RICHMOND, ON THE FIRST MONDAY IN JUNE, IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-EIGHT.
Thomas W. White, Richmond:, 1827
39pp, bound in contemporary marbled boards and half calf [worn, hinges starting]. Else Very Good. This is the first printing of the Journal of the Convention to ratify the proposed U.S. Constitution, after the exceedingly rare 1788 printing of 200 copies. The Convention was called "for the purpose of a full and free investigation, discussion and decision upon the plan of Federal Government for the United States, recommended by the late Federal Convention, held in Philadelphia." The Journal lists delegates, the daily proceedings, the resolutions and votes; and prints the Constitution as ratified, with proposed Amendments consisting of a Declaration of Rights. Sabin 100030n. AI 31619 [4]. Cohen 2951. Not in Harv. Law Cat., Marvin, Marke.

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Post, Jotham [Jr.]:
AN INAUGURAL DISSERTATION, TO DISPROVE THE EXISTENCE OF MUSCULAR FIBRES IN THE VESSELS. SUBMITTED TO THE PUBLIC EXAMINATION OF THE FACULTY OF PHYSIC, UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE TRUSTEES OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE IN THE STATE OF NEW-YORK: WILLIAM SAMUEL JOHNSON, LL.D. PRESIDENT; FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHYSIC; ON THE THIRTIETH DAY OF APRIL, 1793.
T. and J. Swords, Printers to the Faculty of Physic of Columbia College, New-York:, 1793
29pp, plus three blanks. Disbound, else Very Good. The verso of the title page has the Imprimatur in type of Samuel Mitchill, the well-known New York physician who taught at Columbia College. The dissertation is dedicated to two of Post's professors. Post evidently never practiced medicine, despite his graduation from Columbia. Instead, he entered the drug-importing business, was active in New York City politics, a director of New York Hospital [1798-1802], and a single-term Federalist Congressman [1813-1815]. He died in 1817. Evans 26028. Austin 1555.

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[Davis, Jefferson]:
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, FROM FLORIDA CONFEDERATE CONGRESSMAN R.B. HILTON, TO CONFEDERATE PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS, RICHMOND, SEPTEMBER 1, 1862; PLUS, ON ITS VERSO, TWO OTHER MANUSCRIPT DOCUMENTS: [1] DAVIS'S REFERRAL, PERHAPS IN HIS HAND, SIGNED 'J.D.', TO THE SECRETARY OF WAR, REGARDING A COMMUNICATION FROM THE TALLAHASSEE GUARDS; [2] OPINION OF GEORGE WYTHE RANDOLPH, THOMAS JEFFERSON'S GRANDSON, AS CONFEDERATE SECRETARY OF WAR RESPONDING TO DAVIS'S REQUEST. [Recto]: "HIS EXCY. PRESIDENT DAVIS: / SIR: / THE ENCLOSED COMMUNICATION, FROM MEN WHO HAVE DONE GALANT [sic] SERVICE HAS BEEN FORWARDED TO ME TO BE PRESENTED TO YOUR EXCELLENCY - I HOPE IT MAY RECEIVE RESPECTFUL CONSIDERATIONS AND EVEN FAVORABLE ACTIONS./ VERY RESPECTFULLY YR. OBT. SEVT. R.B. HILTON, REP. FROM FLORIDA." On verso [as docketed]: "HON. R.B. HILTON/ M.C. FROM FLORIDA/ RICHMOND SEPT. 1, 1862/ ENCLOSED LETTER FROM TALLAHASSEE GUARDS." [On verso, Davis's reference to the Secretary of War]: "SECY. OF WAR FOR ATTENTION. AS A 12 MOS. COMPANY REORGANIZED THE CLAIM TO ELECT AS SET FORTH SEEMS TO BE WELL FOUNDED. IF THE STATEMENT IS FOUND CORRECT IT WOULD BE BETTER TO GET ANOTHER CO. TO COMPLETE THE REGT. ONE TENDERED FOR THE WAR WOULD NOT PRESENT THE DIFFICULTY. J.D." [On verso, Randolph's response]: "RESPECTFULLY RETURNED THE PRESIDENT. IT IS BELIEVED THAT ALL OF THE COS. OCCUPY THE SAME POSITION NO AUTHORITY HAVING BEEN GRANTED TO RAISE NEW COS. THE PETITIONERS HAVE FALLEN INTO THE MISTAKE OF SUPPOSING THAT OFFICERS ARE ONLY APPOINTED FOR CONSCRIPTS WHEN IN FACT THE LAW AUTHORIZING THE APPOINTMENT OF FIELD OFFICERS IS ONLY APPLICABLE TO VOLUNTEERS. GENL FINEGAN HAS BEEN DIRECTED IN NOMINATING FIELD OFFICERS TO CONSULT AS FAR AS PRACTICABLE THE WISHES OF THE REGT. G.W. RANDOLPH." [In pencil]: "Ans- J.D."
5" x 8", lined paper. Completely in manuscript, two folds. Very thin remnant of paper and glue along one edge from apparently having been glued down previously [a handful of letters only slightly affected]. The middle portion of the verso contains Davis's referral to Randolph, reciting the "enclosed communication" of the Tallahassee Guards. The left portion of the verso contains Randolph's response. Minor toning. Very Good. The Tallahassee Guards, a Leon County militia, were mustered into the 2nd Florida Cavalry in May, 1862, and stationed near Shell Point under Captain Peres B. Brokaw, probably to guard the salt works and fisheries. This cavalry unit officially organized as part of the Districts of East and Middle Florida of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, in December 1862. Joseph Finegan [1814-1885], a member of Florida's Secession Convention, was commissioned Brigadier General in April 1862 in charge of the Districts of East and Middle Florida Robert Benjamin Hilton [1821-1894] was appointed Captain of Company D, First Florida Infantry in April, 1861. He was Florida's Congressman in the First and Second Confederate Congresses. George W. Randolph [1818-1867], Thomas Jefferson's youngest grandson, was Confederate Secretary of War when he responded in this Letter.

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[Stacy, Edmund]:
THE TALE OF THE RAVEN AND THE BLACKBIRD. BY THE AUTHOR OF THE BLACKBIRD'S SONG.
Printed for R. Barnham..., London:, 1715
23. [1 blank] pp. Disbound, else Very Good with elaborate and attractive type ornamentation. "An anti-Jacobite fable" [ESTC], in poetry. ESTC T53824.

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Higgons, B[evill]:
A POEM ON THE GLORIOUS PEACE OF UTRECHT: INSCRIB'D IN THE YEAR 1713, TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ROBERT LATE EARLY OF OXFORD AND EARL MORTIMER. NOW PUBLISH'D AND MOST HUMBLY DEDICATED TO THE PRESENT RIGHT HONOURABLE EDWARD EARL OF OXFORD AND EARLY MORTIMER.
Printed for P. Meighan..., London:, 1731
iv, 19, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, else Very Good, with elaborate and attractive type ornamentation. "First issued in 1713 as 'A poem on the peace'." [ESTC]. The treaty ceded to Britain Gibraltar, Minorca, Hudson Bay, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland; and accorded Britain the exclusive right to import black slaves into America for 30 years ESTC N11716. OCLC records eight locations under several accession numbers as of November 2016.

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