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[Election of 1864]:
CAMPAIGN DOCUMENT, NO. 19. CAMPAIGN SONGS.
12pp, disbound, loose. Caption title [as issued], printed in double columns. Good+. At head of title: 'Sold at 13 Park Row, New York, and at all Democratic Newspaper Offices, at per 1,000 pages.' Words to campaign songs for Little Mac's losing campaign.

Price: $25.00
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War Department, United States:
MORE THAN 1,000 GENERAL ORDERS, FEBRUARY 1861 THROUGH DECEMBER 1864, CONCERNING ALL ASPECTS OF THE UNION ARMY DURING THE CIVIL WAR.
Paginated variously, generally in Very Good condition. Treating all aspects of the organization of the Army, courts martial, promotions, dismissals, troop movements, supplies, political and military developments. They have not been individually researched.

Price: $1,000.00
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[Williams, Samuel]:
SKETCHES OF THE WAR BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE BRITISH ISLES: INTENDED AS A FAITHFUL HISTORY OF ALL THE MATERIAL EVENTS FROM THE TIME OF THE DECLARATION IN 1812... VOLUMES I AND II.
Published by Fay and Davison, Rutland, Vt:, 1815
Original sheep [rubbed, inner front hinge cracked]. iv, 496 pp. Lacking front free endpaper. Light to moderate foxing and spotting. Good+. Howes W479.

Price: $100.00
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Wallace, D.D.:
CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA FROM 1725 TO 1775... PRESENTED AT VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY.
Hugh Wilson, Printer, Abbeville, S.C.:, 1899
Original staples and printed wrappers. xi, [1], 93, [1 blank] pp. Errata slip tipped in. Some bleeding of the staples on the wrappers. Very Good. IV Turnbull 406.

Price: $50.00
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[Lincoln, Abraham]:
75TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION. H.R. 117. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FEBRUARY 12, 1937. MR. CHURCH SUBMITTED THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION; WHICH WAS REFERRED TO THE COMMITTEE ON RULES AND ORDERED TO BE PRINTED. RESOLUTION...
Folio leaf, folded to 7-1/2" x 11". Caption title, as issued. [3], [1- Docketed] pp. Very Good. A Resolution that the "flag in which J. Wilkes Booth caught his spur when he leaped to the state from the President's box at Ford's Theater...be displayed to visitors to the shrines and memorials for Abraham Lincoln in Washingon, District of Columbia, the State of Illinois, and elsewhere." Not in Monaghan.

Price: $75.00
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Great Divide Publishing Company:
THE GREAT DIVIDE. VOL. XI. NO. 10. CHICAGO, OCTOBER, 1894. PRICE 10 CENTS.
Great Divide Publishing Company, Chicago, IL:, 1894
Folio, 10 1/4" x 13 3/4". [234]-254, [1] pp, many illustrations [including photographic]. Original printed and attractively Illustrated [by Frank Beard] title wrappers [as issued]. Disbound, partly loosened. Very Good. The title is in large decorative font on the front wrapper, which is a full-page, satiric color illustration relating to the Tariff enactments of the 53d Congress. A large pig wearing a kingly robe and crown, a diamond ring in his nose, and a gold collar engraved with the word "Plutocracy." On his chest appear the words, "Coal Trust/ Sugar Trust/ Whisky Trust/ School Book Trust." In each hand he holds a leash of gold coins; at the end of one is a dog in a top hat with a collar engraved, "Republican Party"; the other leash controls a bulldog with a derby hat wearing a collar engraved, "Democratic Party." A dish labeled "Lobby" contains bones labeled "bribes." The Capitol building is in the background. The caption beneath the picture reads, "CHAINS OF GOLD./ Plutocrat [to people] - I've harnessed your watch dogs with golden chains. I am in full possession. What are you going to do about it?" The rear wrapper depicts the working man's struggle for fair wages [and possibly the recent Pullman strike]. A man sits at his table with a large loaf of bread labeled "Wages"; his wife stands to the side holding their child and looking on. An elderly, bearded man with the word "Monopoly" on his hat reaches through the kitchen window and, using a knife marked "Capital," cuts a large piece from the loaf. Caption below reads, "LABOR'S LOAF./ Labor - That's my loaf! Don't you cut it, or I'll strike./ Monopoly - Well, strike, then you'll lose it all." In addition to two short articles explaining the wrapper illustrations, this edition contains "In the Silent Land of Sunshine" by Charles F. Allen, "The Habitation of the Gods" by Sadie B. Pritchett, and "Old Apache Days" by Farmer P. Gaston, all with western themes such as Mexico and Arizona, all with photographic illustrations [the Apache article with one showing two shallow graves in the shapes of bodies]; "General Skobeleff" by Thomas Wilson; and many other articles and anecdotes and advertisements such as Ancient Missions and Churches of America, Webster's International Dictionary, Ayer's Pills, and No-To-Bag tobacco cure.

Price: $100.00
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Great Divide Publishing Company:
THE GREAT DIVIDE. VOL. XII. NO. 12. CHICAGO, DECEMBER 1895. PRICE 10 CENTS.
Great Divide Publishing Company, Chicago, IL:, 1895
Folio, 10 1/4" x 13 3/4" [265]-287, [1] pp. Original printed and illustrated title wrappers, many other illustrations. Original staples, six small punch holes at the spine. Title in large decorative font, with full-page color illustration relating to the 1896 election and Tammany Hall. Grover Cleveland is in a checkered suit; two butterflies, labeled "first term" and "second term," sit on his hat. He holds a butterfly net in his hand attempting to catch a butterfly labeled "third term." A tiger is crouched behind him ready to pounce; its collar reads, "Tammany." The caption below the pictures: "A POLITICAL POSSIBILITY./ Cleveland - Now, I'll catch it sure./ Tammany Tiger - You bet your sweet life you will." With a nod to phrenology, the rear wrap is a color illustration of an inventor showing a police captain his patented "self-reforming criminal head moulder," and explaining that by changing the shape of a criminal's skull you can "transform him into an honest man." Eight smaller insets of side and back views of male heads with captions such as: "Aldermanic Type. Ignorant and vulgar; common crook; frequents race tracks and gambling houses."/ "Police Judge. All around crook. Very low."/ and "Professional Juryman. Stupid and unprincipled. Frequents courts." Very Good. In addition to two short articles explaining the wrapper illustrations, this edition contains a two column article on the disappearance of Denver healer Francis Schlatter; "Cliffs and Canons [sic] of Colorado" featuring several photographic illustrations taken along the route of the Rio Grande Western Railroad; the 6 page story "The Christmas Rose" by C. Reid; a few smaller articles such as "How A Woman Outwitted Stage Robbers" by Mrs. M.L. Kimmerly; and many other articles and anecdotes and advertisements such as Harper's Magazine, Harper's Weekly, Cosmopolitan Magazine, Waverly Bicycles, and Pabst Milwaukee Beer. One photographic illustration shows two faces of Caucasian babies and two faces of African American children a bit older with the caption, "A Study in Black and White."

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[Wells College Girls]:
WOMAN'S YEAR BOOK. CONTAINING FOR EACH DAY A QUOTATION ABOUT WOMAN. ALSO AMPLE SPACE HEREIN SHE MAY WRITE HER OWN THOUGHTS AND DEEDS. THE WHOLE COLLECTED AND ARRANGED BY TWO WELLS COLLEGE GIRLS. AND DONE INTO PRINT BY THE CROMELITHE PRESS AT TOLEDO, OHIO.
Cromelithe Press, [Toledo, OH:, 1890]
Square, 8vo, 7" x 7". Unpaginated. Approx. 80+ leaves, deckled edges, printed on rectos only, alternate pages are half leaves. Tan spine with gray illustrated paper covered boards [light discoloration and wear, spotting of spine]. Red ribbon bookmark. All pages printed in red and black inks within black ornamental border. Pencil and ink notations of early owner on versos of several pages. Very Good. OCLC notes 7 copies under two accession numbers, as of August 21, 2017.

Price: $125.00
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[New York State Temperance Society]:
TEMPERANCE RECORDER. EXTRA.
Broadside, 8-1/2" x 12". Illustration at the top: drunkards pouring out of the tavern, a distilery across the way, a mother and her small children looking on at the destruction caused by alcohol. Moderately foxed, small pinhole affecting a portion of a letter, old folds. Good+. Side margin note says: "Was there ever a drunkard who was not once a moderate drinker?" Another says: "If there were no makers and venders of Ardent Spirits in the Union, would there be any Drunkards?" Sabin 94651 [the series].

Price: $75.00
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[Sampson, Moses]:
THE SHAM-PATRIOT UNMASKED; BEING AN EXPOSITION OF THE FATALLY SUCCESSFUL ARTS OF DEMAGOGUES, TO EXALT THEMSELVES, BY FLATTERING AND SWINDLING THE PEOPLE; IN A VARIETY OF PERTINENT FACTS, DRAWN FROM SACRED AND PROFANE HISTORY. BY HISTORICUS. FIFTH EDITION.
Printed by Galen H. Fay, Haverhill:, 1805
47, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, occasional mild foxing. Good+. Gaines, citing two earlier editions, identifies 'Historicus' as Moses Sampson, who chronicles here his disaffection with popular democracy. He emphasizes "the instability of the people, and their liableness to become the dupes of artful and wicked men." AI 9306 [4].

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[Massachusetts]:
VIEW OF THE WHOLE GROUND: COMPRISING THE CONSTITUTION OF THE U. STATES, THE DECLARATION OF RIGHTS AND CONSTITUTION OF MASSACHUSETTS; TOGETHER WITH ALL THE EMBARGO LAWS.
E.W. Allen, Newburyport:, 1809
67pp. Disbound, uniform light toning, Good+. AI 19113 [4].

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[Sierra Leone]:
PAPERS RELATIVE TO THE RIGHTS OF LIBERATED AFRICANS AND THE PREVENTION OF SLAVE DEALING AT SIERRA LEONE. (IN CONTINUATION OF PAPERS PRESENTED AUGUST 12, 1853.) PRESENTED TO BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT BY COMMAND OF HER MAJESTY, AUGUST 12, 1853.
Printed by George Edward Eyre..., London:, 1853
Folio, modern blue wrappers, with copy of title affixed to front wrap. Stitched. 35, [1] pp. Lightly foxed, Very Good. The papers concern the treatment of Liberated Africans under British law; the continuing participation of Africans in the illicit slave trade; the "case of John Cole (a Liberated African), charged with felony and slave-dealing" for having sold into slavery another Liberated African; a report "that a system of petty slave-dealing has been carried on to a considerable extent in Freetown"; the rescue of African children who had been sold as slaves; calendar of prisoners tried for slave-dealing; various other cases of slave-dealing.

Price: $450.00
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[Jackson, Andrew]:
AN EXAMINATION OF THE CIVIL ADMINISTRATION OF GOVERNOR JACKSON IN FLORIDA.
48pp. Browned, few blank margin repairs. Modern plain wrappers. Light institutional stamp and release. Good+. The pamphlet consists of five essays, each with caption title, culled from the columns of the National Intelligencer's June 21, July 3, August 7, September 4 and 23, 1828. Each demonstrates Jackson's characteristically "violent, arbitrary, and rapacious disposition" as Governor of Florida. Each is signed at the end in type, 'Henry.' In aggrandizing legislative, judicial and executive power, Jackson has proved himself a dangerous despot, seeking to "regulate the forms of secret devotion" by declaring a day of Sabbath observance. He seized private property without authority, placing it under his control; prohibited liquor sales to soldiers, and committed other equally heinous acts. Some of the essays were also issued as separate imprints. AI 33107. Wise & Cronin 276. Servies 1366.

Price: $650.00
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[Thayer, John]:
CONTROVERSY BETWEEN THE REV. JOHN THAYER, CATHOLIC MISSIONARY, OF BOSTON, AND THE REV. GEORGE LESSLIE, PASTOR OF A CHURCH IN WASHINGTON, NEW-HAMPSHIRE.
Printed by Richard Folwell, Philadelphia:, 1795
32pp, stitched. Title leaf toned, chip at its lower forecorner. Good+, with the original marbled rear wrapper. Thayer was the first American-born New Englander ordained into the Roman Catholic priesthood [XIV Catholic Encyclopedia 556]. Educated at Yale and a Congregational Clergyman, he attracted notoriety for his conversion. As "the first converted American divine" [DAB], he was known as 'John Turncoat.' Protestants, especially in New England, viciously attacked him. Evidently Thayer gave as good as he got: he was well-known, as the Catholic Encyclopedia puts it, for "his erratic and contentious temper." Because of this characteristic, "he failed as a pastor" to the Catholic Church in Boston. This rare pamphlet defends the infallibility of the Catholic Church and points out various defects in the doctrines of his erstwhile Protestant colleagues. Reverend Lesslie naturally disagreed: Catholicism's "pretended infallibility" is "a cunningly-devised fable, a mere delusion, invented, and imposed on the people of that communion, not to serve our Lord Jesus Christ, but the bellies of the teachers and spiritual guides of the Church." Thayer takes up the challenge, and strikes back. ESTC records holdings only at Notre Dame, Penn, and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. NAIP w014258 adds a copy at Georgetown. AAS does not own it. Evans 29620. ESTC W14258 [3]. Parsons 149 [incorrect collation].

Price: $2,500.00
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[Sierra Leone]:
PAPERS RELATIVE TO THE PREVENTION OF SLAVE DEALING AT SIERRA LEONE. (IN CONTINUATION OF PAPERS PRESENTED AUGUST 12, 1853.) PRESENTED TO BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT BY COMMAND OF HER MAJESTY, AUGUST 1855.
Printed by George Edward Eyre..., London:, 1855
Folio, modern blue wrappers, with copy of title affixed to front wrap. Stitched. iv, 85pp, Near Fine. Informative material on the slave-trade, with lists "of children rescued from slavery, either sold from or purchased and brought into this country"; prosecutions for slave-trading, naming names and punishments imposed; statements of slave children "recently recovered in the western part of the colony;" other statements of "rescued slaves;" and laws and ordinances.

Price: $450.00
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[Children's Book]:
LONDON; A DESCRIPTIVE POEM.
Published by Samuel Wood and Sons, No. 261, Pearl-Street; and Samuel S. Wood & Co. No. 212, Market-St. Baltimore, New York:, [1820]
4-1/4" x 5". 16mo. 32pp. Original stiff printed wrappers. The rear wrapper advertises "Juvenile Books, Published by Samuel Wood & Sons, New York; And Samuel S. Wood & Co., Baltimore." Illustrated with six full-page wood engravings of London scenes by Alexander Anderson. Spotting, but engravings clean. Good+. Welch 792 lists this title with a date of 1820, "New York" misspelled "Nerv-York," and "A" [for Alexander Anderson] signed on the illustration at page 15. Ours does not list a publication date, spells "New York" correctly, and does not have Anderson's logo. Our copy was printed around 1820. In 1822 and thereafter the imprint on Wood's publications changed to "Samuel S. & William Wood," reflecting the participation in the business of Samuel's son. Hamilton 1423. Welch 792. AI 2001. Swarthmore College, Friends Historical Library, entry on Samuel Wood, "a convinced Friend." Not in Rosenbach.

Price: $600.00
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[Holmes, David]:
BENEDICT ARNOLD & HORATIO SEYMOUR! THEIR IDENTITY OF VIEWS. WHO IS TO BE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES? FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES OF SEPTEMBER 19, 1864.
D.S. Holmes, Brooklyn:, [1868]
Broadside, 10" x 13". Text printed with a variety of type fonts. Decorative border. A couple of small blank margin tears, Very Good. Sources at OCLC incorrectly suggest an 1864 publication date for this rare broadside. Seymour was the Democrats' presidential candidate in 1868. His Copperhead utterances during the War haunted his campaign and, of course, he lost decisively to General Grant. The broadside's purpose is to demonstrate that "the points made by HORATIO SEYMOUR against the Administration in 1864 [are] identical, point by point, with those made by BENEDICT ARNOLD against WASHINGTON and the Continental Congress in 1780... The Copperhead chiefs of these times, who draw so lavishly upon the sophistries and fallacies of 1780 for the furtherance of their factious designs, cannot too well understand that the sequel of all this is endless disgrace. They must not expect to fight the Government with the weapons of the Tories and of the blue-light Federalists, without sharing the same fate." OCLC 77763594 [3 - NYHS, LCP, Lincoln Pres. Lib.] as of July 2017.

Price: $850.00
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[Henkel Press] Luther, Martin:
LUTHER'S SMALLER AND LARGER CATECHISMS, TOGETHER WITH AN HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION; TO WHICH ARE ADDED THE UNALTERED AUGSBURG CONFESSION, AND A SELECTION OF HYMNS AND PRAYERS ADAPTED TO CATECHETICAL INSTRUCTION AND FAMILY DEVOTION. SECOND EDITION, REVISED. TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN.
Published by Solomon D. Henkel & Brs. [G.P. Windle & G.R. Calvert, Printers.], Newmarket:, 1855
Original publisher's cloth, stamped in blind, with gilt-lettered spine title. iv, [5]-260, [2 Henkel advts]. Scattered light foxing, tight binding, Very Good. Henkel published the first edition in 1852. The Preface to that edition is printed here. Haynes 10994.

Price: $150.00
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[Habeas Corpus in the Confederacy]:
TO THE HONORABLE LUCAS P. THOMPSON JUDGE OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF VIRGINIA, IN WHICH SAID CIRCUIT, THE COUNTY OF NELSON IS EMBRACED. THE PETITION OF ROBERT H. SMITH RESPECTFULLY SHOWS...
Manuscript habeas corpus petition, 11-3/8" x 17" unfolded, on thick paper. 46 manuscript lines of petition on recto, and 21 lines on verso. Old folds, docketed. An ink smudge but entirely legible, Very Good. Smith's Petition alleges that Confederate Lieutenant John A. Carpenter, the Local Enlisting Officer for Nelson County, had arrested him as a person required to serve in the Confederate Army, and ordered him to report to Camp Lee, near Richmond, on October 7, 1864, for "active service in the field-- and of course your petitioner will be so assigned and made to serve in said army unless discharged by the judgment of the judicial tribunals of the State of Virginia." Smith argues that, as a Justice of the Peace for four years and recently reelected to that position, "he is exempt from all military service in the Confederate States, and that therefore his said arrest is illegal, and his detention in custody by said Lt. Carpenter is without lawful authority and in violation of rights as a citizen and judicial officer of the State of Virginia." Virginia-- by Joint Resolution in March 1864-- has designated officers such as himself "indispensable to the performance of the public functions with which they are charged." They are necessary for the "maintenance of the dignity, integrity and efficiency of the Government of the State, and are not and of right should not be liable to be called into the military service of the Confederate States Government, by virtue of any law thereof." Robert H. Smith signs the petition at the end; it is attested by Justice of the Peace Thomas M. Dickinson, and dated October 4, 1864. The petition's handwriting is neither Smith's nor Dickinson's. The docketed portion indicates that Smith won his case: "1864 Nov. writ sustained & prisoner discharged." The U.S. Census lists Smith [1832-1870] as a Nelson County farmer, living with his wife Marianna [a/k/a Mary Ann McCue] and three young children. He died in Nelson County from consumption. He was the son of Capt. John Massie Smith 1794-1843]. Three of Robert Smith's four brothers-- Charles [1839-1912], Francis [1842-1877], and John [1843-1909] appear to have left college to join the Confederate Army. Thomas M[orrison] Dickinson [1820-1882] was a farmer living in Massies Mill, Nelson County. He was appointed in March, 1865 as a member of the Committees of Safety representing Nelson County. He was married first to Abigail C. Witt Dickinson [1824-1854] in 1844, and then to Mary Elizabeth Dillard [1831-1889] in 1856 and had 8 children with her. [The Daily Dispatch: March 14, 1865, www.perseus.tufts.edu.] Lucas P. Thompson [1797-1866], born in Nelson County, was an Amherst County lawyer who became a judge in the General Court from 1831-1851, and then in the Eleventh Circuit Court from 1851-1866. He was appointed to the Court of Appeals but died before serving. He was a delegate to the 1829-1830 Virginia Constitutional Convention, and proprietor of Staunton Law School from 1839-1849. An Address by John R. Tucker. of Washington and Lee University, described Thompson as holding "a very high place in the esteem of the circuit where he presided for so many years." He had "learning, zeal and ability, great independence of character and inflexible decision of purpose." [Tucker, J.R.: REMINISCENCES OF VIRGINIA'S JUDGES AND JURISTS. 1895. Pages 5, 16.] Lt. John A. Carpenter served in Co. H, 16th Regiment Virginia Infantry. He enlisted in March 1862 as a 2d Lieutenant and, by September 1863, the regiment's enrollment officer. In September, 1864 he was regularly stationed at Nelson County, as ordered by Col. J.O. Shields. [Confederate Army records on Fold3.com, accessed on July 17, 2017.]

Price: $1,000.00
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American Bureau of Mines:
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD. A GEOLOGICAL & AGRICULTURAL SURVEY OF 100 MILES WEST OF OMAHA. BY THE AMERICAN BUREAU OF MINES.
American Bureau of Mines, New York:, 1866
44pp, stitched. Original printed wrappers [front wrapper detached but present]. Else Very Good. A Report, by Thomas Egleston on behalf of the American Bureau of Mines, on the topography of Omaha; the Platte and its tributaries and their valleys; the geology of the Nebraska Territory; bluffs, drifts, boulders, climate, soil, formation of the rolling prairie, agriculture, trees, fences, plantings, mill sites. "Nebraska must remain an agricultural country. For this it is destined by its geographical position, no less than its fertile soil and its climate." It will control the western market, "and the gold and silver of the mountains will be exchanged in this Territory for grain and stock." FIRST EDITION. BRE References Relating to the Union Pacific Railroad 49. Sabin 22054. Not in Eberstadt, Graff, Soliday, Decker.

Price: $375.00
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Medico [pseud.]:
A REVIEW OF GARRISONIAN FANATICISM AND ITS INFLUENCE. BY MEDICO. PUBLISHED BY REQUEST.
Ticknor, Reed & Fields, Boston:, 1852
24pp. Disbound without wrappers, else Very Good. "An attack on certain anti-slavery writings of Rev. J.G. Forman" [Work]. The caption title of this scarce pamphlet:: "Review of Rev. J.G. Forman's (Ultra Unitarian 'Come-Outer,') Defence of Garrisonianism, Infidelity, etc., and of his Personal Abuse of Individuals." For 'personal abuse', it is difficult to top this pamphlet, accusing Forman of "ranting, croaking and sniveling," "mawkish foolery," being a "rabid specimen of humanity," among other sins. "The pineal gland of this fanatical abolition atmosphere" seems to make these abolitionists so unpleasant. Mentor denounces the "Garrisonian ultraism" displayed by Forman and his ilk. "These rabid men, by their rashness, and imprudence, and abuse, do much harm, and thus retard the cause of freedom." In fact, they call for men to resist the fugitive slave law "with a dagger." Work 315. OCLC 28274209 [6] as of July 2017. Not in Blockson or LCP.

Price: $450.00
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Green, Beriah:
FOUR SERMONS, PREACHED IN THE CHAPEL OF THE WESTERN RESERVE COLLEGE, ON LORD'S DAYS, NOVEMBER 18TH AND 25TH, AND DECEMBER 2ND AND 9TH, 1832.
Printed at the Office of the Herald, Cleveland:, 1833
52pp, stitched. Several library marks in blank margins of title page. Bottom blank margin of title leaf clipped. Good+. "In Cleveland, Green's hostility to American slavery...came to a crisis, and on four consecutive Sundays he preached in the college chapel sermons in which he 'haled American slavery to the bar of the Christian religion.' These powerful sermons attracted wide attention, and in December 1833 he was made president of the convention in Philadelphia at which the American Anti-Slavery Society was formed" [DAB]. Green dilates on "points which separate the patrons of the American Colonization Society from the advocates of immediate emancipation." He denounces Colonizationists for "expediency," and for subverting "the first principles of Christian truth" by failing to battle the "prejudice against the colored American, arising from his complexion." Religious institutions have supported slavery and sought to silence Green and like-minded abolitionists. Green "found myself charged with the crime of refusing to preach the gospel, and offering philosophy and politics in the place of its healthful doctrines! Souls, just ready to enter the kingdom of Heaven, I have rudely beaten back!" FIRST EDITION. LCP Supp.60. 132 Eberstadt 426. Dumond 61. Not in Sabin, Work, Blockson, Thomson.

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[Civil War Patriotic Envelopes]:
COLLECTION OF TWENTY-THREE PRO-UNION CIVIL WAR PATRIOTIC POSTAL COVERS ALL WITH CARICATURES OF PEOPLE.
All uncanceled, generally 3" x 5 1/2". Occasional light wear, occasional light dustsoiling. A few have glue remnants on flaps from having been mounted; most do not. Overall, Very Good. The following postal covers in order [by Weiss citation]: C-P-A-4. Printed in red ink. A man in hat and long coat, a soldier turned hobo, holds a bottle in his right hand and a sack on the end of a can in his left hand; a tag hangs from his hat. Caption below image: "An Officer in King Cotton's Army addressing his constituents." C-P-A-6. "A Pair of Spectacles." Image of spectacles: left lens contains scene of Jefferson Davis arriving in Washington, D.C under arrest. "J.D. arrives in Washington from the 'Sunny South'" is printed beneath the left lens. The right lens depicts Davis hanging from the gallows. "J.D. departs from Washington, for a warmer climate" is printed beneath the right lens. Printed in black ink. C-P-A-11. "A Blower." General Henry A. Wise blows through a tube into a contraption while McClellan looks on with sword drawn. Caption reads, "Gen. McClellan. - I say, Wise, put that thing up; everybody knows you're a good blower, but you can't fight!' Imprint of S.C. Upham, 310 Chestnut St. Printed in blue ink. C-P-A-17. Confederate soldier stands in front of a door; Confederate flag atop his bayonet. The shadow he casts on the door shows him standing in the same position but with a noose around his neck. Imprint of E. Cogan, No. 48 N. Tenth Street, Philadelphia on verso. Printed in blue and red inks. C-P-A-19. "A New Way to pay Old Debts, as practiced by the 'Southern Chivalry.'" A southern gentleman, wearing a straw hat, points a revolver at a well-dressed Brit. The southerner holds a cat o'-nine-tails in the crook of his left arm, as does a second southern man in the background who is overseeing slaves. There is also a Confederate flag, a Palmetto tree and a cotton bale in the background. Imprint of D. Murphy's Son, Print. 65 Fulton & 372 Pearl Street, N.Y. Printed in red and blue inks. C-P-A-20. A silhouette of a scraggly Confederate soldier in uniform, boots and spurs on his feet, holding a cat o' nine tails in his left hand and a bottle of "OLD. B" in his right, a sword at his left thigh; initials "J.D." on his hat and "C.S.A." on his belt; Confederate flag behind him with a skull and cross bones on it. The caption reads, "A member of the C.S.A. Alligator Rangers who is to make 5 of the 'Northern mudsils' run. We don't see it." Printed in black ink. C-P-A-21. Same as item C-P-A-20 above but with the imprint of D. Murphy's Son, Print. 65 Fulton & 372 Pearl-sts, N.Y. printed vertically to left of image. C-P-A-26. A well dressed man turns a spinning wheel with the words "Hemp for traitors, North or South" written on it. A field of grain stands to his left, a gallows to his right. The words "Agriculture," "Manufactures," "Fine Arts" are written below the grain, man, and gallows, respectively. Imprint of J. Nash printed in very tiny letters under picture. Printed in black ink on orange cover. C-P-A-32. Bearded individual with a wide-brim straw hat, a sword attached to his belt. He carries a rifle and drags a cannon. Caption below image, "Agricultural Implements going South." Printed in black ink. C-P-C-13. Babies dressed in finery gather around a witch with a pointed hat, cloak and cane. Caption below image, "Commissioners of C.S.A. at the Foreign Courts." Printed in red ink. C-P-D-5. Heavy set woman wears bonnet and aproned dress, one hand on her hip and the other extended. Caption below image, "Did'nt I tell you so? Jeff. Davis." Printed in red ink. C-P-D-8. Two sets of troops march along railroad tracks. Above each is a bubble captioned, "Only 9 miles to the Junction." [The second bubble is missing the 'l' in 'only', as printed.] Caption below image, "Dedicated to the 71st Regiment and the Rhode Island Boys." Imprint printed vertically to left of image, John H. Tinlgye, 1524 Fulton St., N.Y. Printed in blue ink. C-P-D-11. "Death To Traitors" printed at head of envelope and across its full length; each letter made up of images such as a lynching, gallows, soldiers, rifles, and flags. In the background are several tents and more soldiers. Imprint of E. Cogan, 48 N. Tenth Street, Philadelphia on flap. Printed in black ink. C-P-F-3. Jefferson Davis hung by a noose, soldiers standing at attention with bayonets beside a large Union flag. "Jeff. Davis" above his head. Caption below image, "Fate of Traitors!" Printed in red and blue inks. C-P-G-9. Four Union soldiers chase down four Confederate soldiers who are running and stumbling, two of them holding Confederate flags, one fallen to his knees, and one astride a donkey. The Union soldiers have a Union flag, a cannon and rifles with bayonets. One Confederate soldier is poked in the behind and held in the air at the end of a Union soldier's bayonet. Second soldier is riding a donkey. The third soldier may be Robert E. Lee, running with a Confederate flag. Printed in brown ink. Caption: "Grand Victorious 'Return' march of the Rebels." C-P-J-27. General Scott holds Jefferson Davis off the ground by the throat, Davis' hat and sword falling. Text above reads, "Jeff in a tight place, he wont get off "SCOTT free". Caption below reads, "Gen. Scott on being asked 'What he would do with Jeff Davis, if he caught him?' made no reply, but slowly closed his fist with a convulsive grasp." Imprint printed vertically to left of image, Dr. Murphy's Son, Print., 65 Fulton & 372 Pearl-sts. N.Y. Printed in blue ink. C-P-J-30. Jefferson Davis is hoisted in the air atop three Union soldiers' bayonets poked into his bottom. Davis says, "I only wanted to be let alone." The caption beneath the image says, "Jeff's unbounded ambition gives him an elevated position." Printed in red ink. C-P-J-34. Jefferson Davis seated upon what appears to be a cotton bale, arms folded across his chest. Caption below image, "Jeff. King of the Cotton plant-nation, on his throne." Imprint below caption of S.C. Upham, 310 Chestnut St. Printed in blue ink. [This is an interesting cover which pokes fun at one with an identical image printed by J. Mullen of New Orleans which has C.S.A. above Davis' head and says "Cotton defeated Packenham, and Cotton will defeat "Ape Lincoln."] C-P-J-36. Jefferson Davis chews on a root with the Confederate flag growing from it. A man kneeling in front of him with hands in praying position says, "Sweet flag." The caption below reads, "'He will hold on to the bitter end.' - DAVIS' SPEECH." Printed in black ink. C-P-J-54. Davis and Scott sit at a table playing chess. Davis' features appear devil-like. "Jeff. Davis" above his image; "Gen. Scott" above his image. Caption below says, "Jeff Davis Checkmated." Imprint vertically to left of image, "Copyright secured by Brown & Ryan, New York." Printed in blue ink. C-P-J-59. A hand holds a card which reads "Jeff Davis' Passport" vertically, and "Mr. Jeff. Davis and friends are permitted to leave the State of Virginia. Winfield Scott" horizontally. Imprint vertically to left of image, "New-York Union Envelope Depot, 144 Broadway." Printed in blue ink. C-P-J-67. "JEFF. DAVIS GOING TO WAR." Beneath the caption is Davis' face. When you turn the card upside down, a second caption reads "JEFF, RETURNING FROM WAR" with the image now appearing to be the head of an ass. Printed beneath image, "Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by E. Rogers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States in and for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania." Printed in several colors. C-P-J-74. Elaborate scene of Davis approaching a guillotine as uniformed soldiers look on with raised swords; buildings appear in the background. Reminiscent of the French Revolution. Caption below image reads, "Jeff. Davis's adieu to his foes. His last words, let me alone now, and I will go home and live the balance of my days on Hog, Hominy, Whiskey and Tobacco." Printed in blue ink.

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Tucker, J.L.:
THE RELATIONS OF THE CHURCH TO THE COLORED RACE. SPEECH OF THE REV. J.L. TUCKER, D.D., OF JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, BEFORE THE CHURCH CONGRESS, HELD IN RICHMOND, VA., ON THE 24-27 OCT., 1882. THIS SPEECH IS HERE SOMEWHAT ENLARGED, BUT ADHERES TO THE LINE OF ARGUMENT ADOPTED AT THE CONGRESS. AS ORIGINALLY DELIVERED THE SPEECH WAS CUT SHORT AT THE END OF TWENTY MINUTES, BY THE SECRETARY'S BELL.
Charles Winkley, Steam Book and Job Print., Jackson, Miss.:, 1882
91, [1 blank] pp. Original printed front wrapper with wrapper title [as issued], new blank rear wrapper added, stitched. Front wrap has several small chips in margins, spine reinforced. Final leaf laid down, with loss to margins and a couple of letters. Good+. This rare pamphlet is a vicious attack on the intelligence and character of "the colored race." Tucker asserts that they are "utterly unfitted for citizenship" "retrograding in morality," "unintelligent and slow," with the "instinct of concealment," and, though "professing religion, have a form of Christianity without its substance: and further, that they have no comprehension of what that substance ought to be." Slavery was a good thing: "When the negroes were brought over to this country they were absolute barbarians." Alexander Crummell responded in an 1883 pamphlet. Not in LCP, Work, Blockson, Owen. OCLC 476536758 [2- NYHS, Howard U.], 918156528 [1- Freie U. Berlin], 228706980 [1- Huntington] as of July 2017.

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Curtis, Thomas:
INAUGURAL ADDRESS, DELIVERED IN THE HALL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, COLUMBIA, BEFORE THE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH CAROLINA, DECEMBER 3, 1850.
Printed by A.S. Johnston, Columbia, S.C.:, 1851
27pp, disbound. Very Good. Educators as the great civilizers of mankind. Curtis was President of the Teachers' Association of South Carolina. Not in Turnbull or Sabin. OCLC 8645865 [5], 191303447 [1] as of July 2017.

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Tartan:
PHILADELPHIA MALIGNANTS. TYPOGRAPHED. "CAN SUCH THINGS BE?" BY TARTAN.
Weir & Co. 34 South Third Street, Philadelphia:, 1863
Original printed glossy front wrapper. Loose leaves. Clean text. Good+. A satirical pamphlet, in Biblical style, on the idiocy of Southerners and their sympathizers in dissolving the Union and initiating Civil War. The nation of the "Yan Kees waxed great... the whole nation was puffed up." But it became divided "between the Idlers and the Workers." The former "loved swift horses and strong drink." The latter were industrious and hard-working. As time went on, the Idlers "seized some of the strongholds of the nation, and gathered a great army against the chief city." Among the satirized are Quakers ["Broadbrims"], James Buchanan ["James the Faithless"], General McClellan ["he did loiter and halt ever"]. Sabin 94400.

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Musgrave, Rev. G.W.:
A SERMON OCCASIONED BY THE DEATH OF MAJOR JAMES OWEN LAW. PUBLISHED AT THE REQUEST OF THE INDEPENDENT GREYS.
S[heridan] Guiteau,- No. 2 Franklin Buildings. Sherwood & Co., Printers, Baltimore:, 1847
Original printed wrappers, 32pp. Frontis engraving of Law by Ritchie from a daguerreotype. Minor wear, scattered light spotting, Very Good. Law, born in 1809, was commander of the Independent Greys. He had served as Mayor of Baltimore. "He never had an opportunity of displaying his courage and skill upon the field of battle," but "nobly did he carry himself amid the civil commotions and riots" of the City, particularly when a mob threatened destruction of the Roman Catholic Church. He died quickly and unexpectedly after having ministered to "poor and diseased strangers who had reached our shores...the infected Immigrants." Sheridan Guiteau [1801-1872], the publisher, was a Baltimore Presbyterian minister and second cousin, once removed, of Charles J. Guiteau, the assassin of President Garfield. Sheridan's great-grandfather, Francis Guiteau [1690-1760], was Charles' great-great-grandfather. Sheridan became the first pastor of the Franklin Square Presbyterian Church of Baltimore in 1833, and later pastored the First Presbyterian Church of Howard County. He became involved with publishing and printing tracts, and was listed for many years in the Baltimore directories as "Guiteau, Rev. Sheridan, agent for Sunday School and Tract Depository," under the category "Booksellers, Stationers and Publishers." He also served for a time as Secretary of the Maryland branch of the American Tract Society. [Shepherd: HISTORY OF BALTIMORE, MARYLAND... 1898. Page 357; American Tract Society: TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY...1849. Page 42; Baltimore City Directories for 1853, 1855, and 1863.] FIRST EDITION. Sabin 51577.

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[Care, Henry]:
ENGLISH LIBERTIES: OR, THE FREE-BORN SUBJECT'S INHERITANCE, CONTAINING I. MAGNA CHARTA, THE PETITION OF RIGHT, THE HABEAS CORPUS ACT; AND DIVERS OTHER MOST USEFUL STATUTES: WITH LARGE COMMENTS UPON EACH OF THEM. II. THE PROCEEDINGS IN APPEALS OF MURTHER; THE WORK AND POWER OF PARLIAMENTS; THE QUALIFICATIONS NECESSARY FOR SUCH AS SHOULD BE CHOSEN TO THAT GREAT TRUST. PLAIN DIRECTIONS FOR ALL PERSONS CONCERNED IN ECCLESIASTICAL COURTS; AND HOW TO PREVENT OR TAKE OFF THE WRIT DE EXCOMMUNICATO CAPIENDO. AS ALSO THE OATH AND DUTY OF GRAND AND PETTY JURIES. III. ALL THE LAWS AGAINST CONVENTICLES AND PROTESTANT DISSENTERS WITH NOTES, AND DIRECTIONS BOTH TO CONSTABLES AND OTHERS CONCERN'D, THEREUPON; AND AN ABSTRACT OF ALL THE LAWS AGAINST PAPISTS.
Printed by G. Larkin, for Benjamin Harris, at the Stationers Arms and Anchor in the Piazza under the Royal-Exchange, London:, [1682?]
12mo. [10], 228 pp, as issued. Bound in 19th century quarter vellum and pale blue boards [front hinge starting, some spine wear]. One tear at leaf 35-36, costing several letters. Very Good. This is the rare first edition; ESTC records none earlier. It prints the Magna Charta, Notes on Magna Charta ["This Excellent Law holds the first place in our Statute Books"], "A Confirmation of the Charters of the Liberties of England," other fundamental documents supporting trial by jury, liberty of conscience, and the foundations of individual rights and limited government. 'English Liberties' "drew from the radical reading of Magna Carta to defend the personal freedom of freeborn Englishmen. Building on the authority of the Great Charter, this work defended trial by jury and established the persisting legal freedoms based on Magna Carta. Care's work was condemned as seditious by the authorities but it was repeatedly reproduced into the 18th century, being regarded as a handbook of civil liberties. Editions were also produced in the American colonies at Boston and Providence between 1721 and 1774..." [online site of the British Library]. 'English Liberties' transmitted "fundamental laws and the rights and liberties of Englishmen to eighteenth-century England and the American colonies," where its influence was substantial. "Indeed, one scholar suggested some thirty years ago that 'English Liberties' had more to do with preparing the minds of American colonists for the American Revolution than the larger but less accessible works of Coke, Sidney, and Locke." [Lois Schwoerer, THE INGENIOUS MR. HENRY CARE, RESTORATION PUBLICIST. (2001). Page xxvi, 235. Internal quotations omitted]. Benjamin Harris, for whom this book was published, was an interesting man in his own right. A London radical and noisy anti-Catholic, he was convicted of sedition when he opposed the succession of James, Duke of York. In 1686 he immigrated to Boston, opened a coffee-house, and continued his trade. NAIP records 66 publications mentioning his name in the imprint [the earliest an Almanac, likely from 1686]. "His newspaper, 'Publick Occurrences, Both Foreign and Domestick' (Sept. 25, 1690), the first newspaper printed in the colonies, was suppressed by Boston authorities after one issue. Sometime before 1690 Harris published 'The New-England Primer', adapted from his earlier, savagely political speller, 'The Protestant Tutor' (1679); the primer was for half a century the only elementary textbook in America. He returned to London in 1695" [Encyclopedia Britannica]. FIRST EDITION. Wing C515. ESTC R31286. I Harv. Law Cat. 335 [later printings]. Bailyn, Ideological Origins of the American Revolution 44. Marvin 173 [later printings].

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[Confederate Postal Covers]:
COLLECTION OF TWENTY-ONE UNUSED CONFEDERATE PATRIOTIC POSTAL COVERS.
All unused, generally 3" x 5 1/2". Minor wear, occasional light foxing and dustsoiling, some previously mounted [glue and paper remnants on flap side]. Only No. 7 is listed in the Boyd bibliography. Good+ to Very Good. 1. Cover entirely in red, white, and blue colors of the Confederate flag, with eleven white stars on blue background and small portrait of Jefferson Davis immediately to the right of the stars. 2. Large Confederate flag, with twelve stars in circle, two tassels hanging from the finial. white stars on blue background on left. Printed with lavender ink. Image takes up entire front of cover. 3. Ten star Confederate flag in color, a soldier standing at attention next to it with his bayonet; tents in the background. The words "DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR" printed beneath it. Printed in red and blue inks. 4. Cannon in front of an eleven star Confederate flag. Image on left. Printed below image: 'ITS THUNDER TONES SHALL AROUSE THE FREEMAN.' Printed with red and blue inks. 5. Cover with the South Carolina state flag [palmetto tree and half moon] on a pole. Image on left. Printed below image, "We are Seven." Printed in black ink. 6. Cover with two seven star Confederate flags in color, their poles crossed with a snake wrapped around them. The words "DON'T TREAD ON US" above it; "EVER READY WITH OUR LIVES AND FORTUNES" beneath it. A picture of a tree and mountains in a circle printed in blue ink at the very bottom. 7. Cover with portrait of Jefferson Davis with signature "Jeffn Davis". Yellow cover printed in black ink. Boyd 3.10. 8. Cover with seven star Confederate flag, initials C.S.A. beneath it. Printed in red and blue inks. 9. Portrait of Jefferson Davis in an oval frame flanked by two Confederate flags on each side, bayonets at the center, and cannons underneath. Caption printed vertically to left, "HON. JEFFERSON DAVIS, THE CHAMPION OF THE SOUTH." Printed in red and blue inks. 10. Variation of cover described above, same images but with caption at top, "Copy-right Secured. / HON. JEFFERSON DAVIS CHAMPION OF THE SOUTH." Printed in red and blue inks. 11. "Hear the Northern thunders mutter! / Northern Flags in the South wind flutter;/ Send them back your firm defiance!/ Stamp upon the accurs'd alliance!/ C.S." Black ink on buff [light yellow?] envelope. Printed in five lines at top left corner. 12. "Delaware is in 4 See Ess A." Printed in large type to left of envelope; black ink on yellow envelope. 13. Portrait of George Washington with the verse below, "FLORIDA/ Is in the field! The piercing cries of her Eagle has been heard throughout the Confederacy, and will be answered by her noble sons!!!" All surrounded by a rectangular frame. Blue ink printed on a yellow envelope. 14. Troops on horseback pulling a wagon with three men and a cannon coming off the back. "THE NATION'S DEFENSE" at top. "C.S.A." in large type below. Printed in red ink. 15. Image of Virginia's seal which depicts a soldier standing on his fallen foe and the caption above "SIC SEMPER TYRANNIS;" all within a circle. An eagle behind the circle with the word "VIRGINIA" over its head, cornucopias on either side of the circle and caption below, "LIBERTY OR DEATH." Black ink on goldenrod envelope. 16. Image of variation of early seal of South Carolina depicting a palmetto tree with arrows at its base, mountains in the background, all within a circular border. Caption below, "EVER READY WITH OUR LIVES AND FORTUNES." Printed in blue ink. 17. An image of General Butler wearing a giant hat and riding on the back of a horse, holding his sword high. "Picayune Butler" below. Obviously comparing him to the famous Civil War era black banjo player and one time clown who had a reputation for drinking. Black ink printed on a yellow envelope. 18. Confederate shield with "THE EMBLEM OF THE SOUTH" below. Printed in red and blue inks. 19. Confederate flag with seven stars in a circle. Printed in red and blue inks. 20. Confederate flag with ten stars and caption below, "DON'T TREAD ON US." Printed in red and blue inks. 21. Confederate flag with eleven stars. Printed in lavender ink.

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[Civil War - Slavery Postal Covers]:
SIX UNUSED UNION POSTAL COVERS WITH CARICATURED IMAGES OF SLAVES
5-5/8" x 3-1/8". A few have minimal staining, one a chipped corner [no loss of text or caricature]. Very Good. 1. Three well-dressed male house slaves sit at a small table, one with two legs of his chair off the ground and his legs on the table's edge. "SEE-SESSION" printed above the scene with a hand pointing a finger in place of a hyphen. The caption beneath the scene reads, "'Twill take all Massa's money and more too." Picture in black ink, words in red. No imprint. Weiss C-BL-29. 2. A slave stands holding a leash with a dog wearing a collar engraved "JEFF;" a mule looks over a fence and says, "Jeff has the feelings of a Prince of Wails." Printed in blue ink. Philadelphia: Magee, 316 Chestnut St. Weiss C-BL-35. 3. "The 'Peculiar Institution'" printed above the bare feet of a slave. Beneath is the caption, "Secession's Moving Foundation. Tendency due North - via 'Monroe'." Cincinnati: Harpel, 3d & Vine Sts. Printed in black ink. Weiss C-BL-41 4. "JEFF THE DICTATOR" printed over a rope in a figure eight configuration. In the top loop is a picture of Davis in uniform, holding his sword and a flag with skull and crossbones. The words, "As he is" printed to the right. The lower loop depicts Davis shirtless and shoeless with only a torn pair of pants, digging with hoe while a slave stands fully dressed behind him holding a whip. The words, "As he should be" printed to the left. "JEFF THE DIG-TATER- ER" printed at the bottom. Printed using red and blue inks. New York: D. Murphy's Son, Print., 65 Fulton & 372 Pearl Sts. Weiss C-P-J-46. 5. Jefferson Davis is held in the talons of a flying eagle with the name "JEFF" printed to his left and the words, "Oh! Lord! Let me alone!" coming from his mouth. A flag with a skull and crossbones is in his hands. Three slaves-- a woman and two young men-- stand beneath him. The woman says, "Golly, Mas'a Jeff! You's in a bad fix sure enough!" Caption at the bottom: "Uncle Sam sends his bird after Traitor Jeff." Printed in red ink. Weiss C-BL-55. 6. Variation of no. 5: printed entirely in black ink. Weiss C-BL-55a.

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[Buchner Tobacco Company]:
DEFENDERS AND OFFENDERS.
D. Buchner and Company, New York:, [1888]
Original decorated cloth [rubbed at extremities, chipped at spine ends, a bit shaken]. [124] pp. With 210 chromolithograph portrait illustrations, each with a brief biography on the facing page. Some minor offsetting, Very Good. The first ten portraits depict New York City, Brooklyn and Jersey City police superintendents and inspectors. There follow 200 chromolithograph portrait illustrations of sundry criminals: Mrs. Druse, "the first woman hanged in the State of New York" [she murdered her husband]; August Spiess, executed for the Haymarket murders; S. Fischer, "a pronounced Anarchist" executed with Spiess; Johnny Beal, a "young rascal" of thirteen years who murdered his mother; Dan Driscoll, leader of the Whyo Gang in New York City; Bertha Heyman, "notorious and successful confidence woman"; Calandro Bettini, "the head of a band of Italian counterfeiters in New York City"; James Watson, "an expert pickpocket"; "William Patterson, colored," convicted of murder and "a notorious thief and burglar"; Emma Davis, a "remarkable woman" with "a mania for administering poison to those whom she thinks have been long enough in this world"; Hong Di, a "chinese murderer"; Michael Kurtz, known as "Sheeny Mike"; and assorted other thieves, murderers, train robbers, bank robbers, forgers. Twenty-five women are depicted, several members of Western gangs, as well as some Negroes. The last page is a sketch of the Buchner Tobacco Company in New York City. The Company issued trade cards with its tobacco products, and this book appears to follow that illustrative style. Adams Six-Guns 578.

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[Children's Book]:
MARKS'S EDITION OF THE ADVENTURES OF GOODY TWO SHOES AND HER BROTHER THOMAS.
Published by J.L. Marks, 91, Long Lane, Smithfield, London:, [@1850]
6-3/4" by 4-1/4" in printed pictorial title wrappers. Stitched. Eight leaves, with richly hand-colored illustrations. Blank verso of last leaf pasted to rear wrapper. Closed tear to one leaf [no loss]. Good+. Housed in a custom woven cloth foldover chemise with a gilt printed paper label to the upper cover. Not located on OCLC or the online site of the British Library as of July 2017.

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[Children's Book]:
THE CHILD'S BIRTH-DAY; HISTORY OF SAMUEL DANIELL; AND LITTLE NANCY.
Published by the Sunday and Adult School Union, And for Sale at Bradford's Bookstore, Philadelphia:, 1818
2-1/2" x 4". 32pp. Stitched in original printed title wrappers. Light to moderate spotting, small closed tear. Good+. A rare chap-book, and apparently the first edition of this title. OCLC also locates an1820 Philadelphia printing, and Philadelphia and Boston printings in 1821, all rare. Welch 188. OCLC 23068195 [1- U FL], 2398025 [1- AAS] as of July 2017. Not in American Imprints.

Price: $450.00
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Bonney, Charles Carroll:
THE PRESENT CONFLICT OF CAPITAL AND LABOR. A DISCOURSE.
Chicago Legal News Co., Chicago:, 1886
Original printed wrappers [some wear], stitched. 36pp, printed on glossy paper. Good+. Bonney delivered his Discourse at Chicago's New Jerusalem Church on May 16, 1886. The Chicago Sabbath Association published it. The Prefatory Note explains, "It was immediately prompted by what is known as the Haymarket Massacre of May 4, 1886." Bonney was a prominent Chicago lawyer, a justice of the Illinois Supreme Court, Vice President of the American Bar Association, and a member of the New Jerusalem Church. Bonney observes that America has welcomed "tens of thousands of foreign-born people... ignorant of our language and the peculiarities of our civilization; as uninformed of the nature and purposes of our government... as the kindred they left behind them on their native soil." Instead of educating them in the duties of citizenship, "we have left the new comers to the politicians, who want their votes, and the anarchist leaders who want to live upon their toil, rule them with rods of iron, and finally lead them to destruction." Although he denounces the recklessness of capitalists' unrestrained wealth and power, Bonney's major concern is the "new labor movement," which has created "a despotism more arbitrary, absolute and relentless than any hitherto known in this country." The "peremptory orders" given to the industrial laborer place him in a status worse than even the "Southern slave." OCLC records fourteen institutional locations as of July 2017.

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Currier, N.:
ZACHARY TAYLOR, PEOPLE'S CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENT. MILLARD FILLMORE, WHIG CANDIDATE FOR VICE PRESIDENT.
Currier, New York:, 1848
Oblong. Image 12-1/2" x 8-1/2" within border, which contains the title. Bottom margin stained, with a couple of chips taking several letters from the word "President." Otherwise Good+. "Campaign banner for Whig presidential and vice presidential nominees for 1848, Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore. Unlike Currier's other Whig banners... this example is horizontal rather than vertical in format. Bust portraits of the two candidates, Taylor in uniform on the left and Fillmore on the right, are framed with acanthus wreaths, and set side-by-side against a dressed stone wall on which are incised three stars. The candidates are turned slightly toward each other and appear against a sky background. The banner compares closely with another banner which Currier produced for the Cass-Butler ticket. Taylor and Fillmore were nominated on June 9, 1848, and this print probably appeared soon thereafter. Although Taylor is here titled the 'People's Candidate for President,' Fillmore is merely called the 'Whig Candidate'." [Reilly] Reilly 1848-10.

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Fremont, John C.:
FREE SPEECH. FREE PRESS. FREE KANSAS. FREMONT. /REPUBLICAN TICKET./ FOR JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT, - SHORT TERM. OZIAS BOWEN/ FOR JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT, - FULL TERM. JOSIAH SCOTT/ FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL. CHRISTOPHER P WOLCOTT/ FOR COMMISSIONER OF COMMON SCHOOLS. ANSON SMYTH/ FOR MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. JOHN WADDLE/ FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS. JOHN A GURLEY/ FOR JUDGES OF COMMON PLEAS. WILLIAM M DICKSON, WARNER M BATEMAN, JOHN W CALDWELL/ FOR SHERIFF: ENOCH T CARSON/ FOR AUDITOR. JOSEPH B HUMPHREYS/ FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. MICHAEL GOEPPER, JOSEPH BURGOYNE/ FOR PROSECUTING ATTORNEY. DAVID P LOWE/ FOR DIRECTOR OF THE COUNTY INFIRMARY. JOHN STOLTZ/ FOR CORONER. DR. LEVI M ROGERS/ FOR THE BANK CHARTER/ AGAINST THE BANK CHARTER./ FOR ERECTION OF THE LUNATIC ASYLUM --- YEA --- NAY.
Broadside, 3 1/8" x 10". Pink ticket printed with black ink. Vignette of Fremont standing on a mountain top and holding an American flag in his right hand. One horizontal fold, minimal light foxing. Very Good. This was the first presidential election of the new Republican Party. Fremont's name and the campaign slogan [as above] are printed in the heading. Ohio Republican underticket candidates are listed: Ozias Bowe and Josiah Scott for Supreme Court; Christopher P. Wolcott for Attorney General; Anson Smyth for Commissioner of Common Schools; and others, generally from Hamilton County.

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Chase, Samuel:
REPORT OF THE TRIAL OF THE HON. SAMUEL CHASE, ONE OF THE ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES, BEFORE THE HIGH COURT OF IMPEACHMENT, COMPOSED OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES, FOR CHARGES EXHIBITED AGAINST HIM BY THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, IN THE NAME OF THEMSELVES, AND OF ALL THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES, FOR HIGH CRIMES & MISDEMEANORS, SUPPOSED TO HAVE BEEN BY HIM COMMITTED; WITH THE NECESSARY DOCUMENTS AND OFFICIAL PAPERS, FROM HIS IMPEACHMENT TO FINAL ACQUITTAL. TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND, BY CHARLES EVANS, AND THE ARGUMENTS OF COUNSEL REVISED BY THEM FROM HIS MANUSCRIPT.
Samuel Butler and George Keatings, Baltimore:, 1805
pp [6], 12, [3]-244, 237-268, 68 [as issued, no repetition of text]. Original calf, possibly rebacked at an early date [light wear to corners, small chips to spine, spine label worn]. Foxed; dark stain runs through top margin [enters first few lines of text of final seventy or so pages]. Good. In 1796 President Washington nominated the Federalist Chase, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, to the Supreme Court; the Senate unanimously confirmed. Angered by President Adams's last-minute judicial appointments, Jeffersonians resolved, after the 1800 election, to make "an example of at least one Judge." Chase became their target. The pretext was his harangue to a Maryland Grand Jury, opposing Jefferson's agenda. His "unnecessarily strenuous support of the Sedition Law, his prejudiced and passionate conduct of the trials of the two Republicans, Thomas Cooper and James T. Callender...and his personal traits had long subjected him to vicious and unmeasured attacks" [I Warren, The Supreme Court 273]. Cohen 14471. Sabin 12204. Bristol 340. AI 8173 [5].

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Currier, Nathaniel [James K. Polk]:
THE PEOPLE'S CANDIDATES FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT. GRAND NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC BANNER. PRESS ONWARD.
Lith. & Pub. by N. Currier, New York:, [1844]
Handcolored lithograph, 9-1/2" x 13". Light toning and wear, else Very Good in an attractive wood frame. "In the center of the banner are the portraits of presidential candidate James K. Polk and vice presidential candidate George M. Dallas both surrounded by decorative oval borders. Above Polk's portrait within the border are the words 'Polk the Young Hickory.' Above the portrait of Dallas within the border are the words 'Dallas and Victory.' Centered above the portraits is an eagle holding the end of one of the decorative flags in its mouth. Below the portraits are ribbons with the words 'The people's candidates for president and vice-president.' The title and subtitle 'Grand National Democratic Banner: Press Onward' are in the lower margin along with the publisher's information" [Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection]. Reilly describes a variant of ours. In Reilly's, the campaign slogan 'Polk, The Young Hickory. Dallas and Victory' appears above the eagle. Reilly's copy prints the name of each candidate beneath his portrait; ours does not. Beneath the candidates' portraits, within the coiled ribbon, Reilly's copy prints "President and Vice-President." The portrait of Dallas in Reilly's copy is that of a white-haired man; ours is a more youthful Dallas. Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection 71.2009.081.1102. Reilly 1844-13 [reference].

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Currier, Nathaniel:
FRANKLIN PIERCE. WILLIAM R. KING. THE DEMOCRATS CHOICE FOR PRESIDENT & VICE PRESIDENT FROM 1853. TO 1857. GRAND, NATIONAL, DEMOCRATIC BANNER. PRESS ONWARD.
Lith. & Pub. by N. Currier, New York:, [1852]
Handcolored lithograph, 9-1/2" x 13". Presidential campaign banner featuring bust portraits of candidates Franklin Pierce and William R. King in ovals with laurel wreaths beneath an eagle perched on a globe labeled 'America' and above the phrase at bottom, 'The Democrats Choice for President & Vice President from 1853 to 1857,' within a coiled ribbon. Upper portion of the banner surrounded by a heavy red curtain with yellow tassels. Above the eagle are stars, and on either side blue buntings. In an attractive wood frame [light chipping]. Very Good. Currier used a similar format and phrasing in his 1844 banner for Democrats Polk and Dallas [Reilly 1844-13]; and his 1848 banner for Cass and Butler [Reilly 1848-6]. Not in Reilly. Library of Congress Control Number 2001702114. OCLC 794161147 [1- LC], 950901127 [1- AAS] as of June 2017.

Price: $850.00
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Douglas, Stephen Arnold:
STEPHEN DOUGLAS POSTAL COVER DEPICTING PORTRAIT OF STEPHEN DOUGLAS WITH HIS FACSIMILE SIGNATURE BENEATH THE PORTRAIT AND "TELL MY BOYS TO LOVE AND OBEY THE CONSTITUTION" ALONG LEFT SIDE OF THE COVER.
2 1/4" x 5". Buff postal cover printed with black ink. Unused. Small glue remnant at flap from earlier mounting. Variation of Weiss FP-PNM-53 which has same verse but printed directly beneath the signature. Very Good. Senator Douglas of Illinois was the presidential nominee of the regular Democratic Party in 1860. Realizing late in the campaign that he would lose the election, he campaigned valiantly for preservation of the Union. Exhausting himself, he died in early 1861, allegedly urging with his final words for the people to support the Constitution and laws. Weiss FP-PNM-53 [variation]. Milgram SD-27.

Price: $125.00
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Currier, Nathaniel:
ZACHARY TAYLOR, THE PEOPLE'S CHOICE FOR 12TH PRESIDENT.
Lith. & Pub. by N. Currier, 152 Nassau St. Cor. of Spruce, New York:, [1848]
Multi-colored portraits of the first eleven presidents encircle a larger and more detailed portrait of Taylor, who wears military dress. Beneath Taylor's portrait is the title. At the base of the image, within a yellow banner, is printed 'The Presidents of the United States.' Four flags are draped at the top. Each of the Presidents surrounding Taylor has the years served at the top of his portrait. Framed, minor spotting, Very Good. The Library of Congress's "impression of the Taylor banner was deposited for copyright on June 23, 1848, two weeks after Taylor's nomination" [Reilly]. Reilly 1848-5. OCLC 298513986 [1- AAS] as of June 2017. Library of Congress Control Number 2003674556

Price: $375.00
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[Currier, Nathaniel]:
ANDREW JACKSON, SEVENTH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
Lith. & Pub. by N. Currier, 152 Nassau St. Cor. of Spruce, New York:, [1835-1840]
Half-length portrait of Andrew Jackson, in wood frame [one corner chip] behind glass. The President, visible from the waist up, sits before a heavy purple curtain. The curtain is lifted at the left with a gold tassel to reveal the base of a column. His right arm rests on a table, beside papers, a book, an inkwell and quill pen. A sword is loosely cradled in his left arm. He wears a white cravat with a black waistcoat and jacket. Bit of margin dusting, else Very Good. Library of Congress Control Number 90708631 [curtain is green rather than purple]. OCLC 317114711 [1- AAS, with green curtain], as of June 2017.

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Sons of Temperance:
CONSTITUTIONS OF THE ORDER OF THE SONS OF TEMPERANCE OF NORTH AMERICA. TO WHICH IS APPENDED THE BY-LAWS AND RULES OF ORDER OF THE GRAND DIVISION OF TENNESSEE, AND THE REVISED RULES OF THE NATIONAL DIVISION OF N. AMERICA, FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF GRAND AND SUBORDINATE LODGES.
Printed by A. Nelson, Nashville:, 1850
3 1/2" x 5 1/2". Original printed front yellow wrapper, stitched. 96pp. Light to moderate foxing, Good+. All the official documents of this popular organization. OCLC records a single copy of the 1848 edition [OCLC 15717683] at the Tennessee State Library; but not this one.

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[Benton, L.H.]:
PHILATELIC LITERATURE. PUBLISHED IN THE INTEREST OF PHILATELIC LITERATURE. L.H. BENTON, EDITOR. A.J. KIRBY, BUSINESS MGR.
Published by Kirby & Benton, Taunton, Mass.:, 1896-1900
Volume I, nos. 1-6; Volume II, Nos. 1-2. Paginated continuously. 92, [2] pp. Bound in later cloth. Very Good. A rare journal, published for philatelists in rather sporadic fashion. The first number was published in November 1796; Volume I, number 6 issued in June 1798. Volume 2, number 1 was published on July 31, 1899; number 2 issued in February 1900. Auctions, advertisements, and other information for this lively group are featured. Not in Lomazow or at AAS. OCLC 880351757 [1- Smithsonian Small Journal Collection] as of June 2017.

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[Texas]:
GALVESTON BAY & TEXAS LAND COMPANY
Broadside, 8" x 12.5", bottom edge untrimmed. Engraved land Certificate, decorated, printed in several different typesettings. The Certificate number and Rodman Moulton's name are in manuscript. As with all the Certificates examined by Streeter, the trustees-- Anthony Dey, George Curtis and William H. Sumner-- sign in ink, as does the secretary, W.H. Willson. Engraved illustration of two cherubs at top right corner, decorative sidebar at left margin with certificate information. Small map of southeastern Texas engraved in lower left corner with shaded area showing where available property is located. Rodman Moulton's signature endorsing the Certificate is on the verso. Very Good. The Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company "was the first commercial effort in the United States to emulate Stephen Austin's plans to colonize Texas" [Beinecke Library collection of Anthony Dey Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company Records online]. The Company was organized in New York on October 16, 1830 by three attorneys: Anthony Dey [1776-1859] [president], and George Curtis [1799-1884] and William H. Sumner [1780-1861] [as trustees]. Dey was also a director of the New Jersey Railroad and a prominent Jersey real estate investor. Curtis, a Union College graduate, became a prominent New York lawyer; Sumner, the son of Massachusetts Governor Increase Sumner, was a prominent Boston lawyer who served in the Massachusetts State Legislature; was aide-de-camp to Governors Caleb Strong and John Brooks from 1816-1818. Willson, from Boston, lived in San Jacinto, Galveston Bay, around 1833 or 1834. [PROCEEDINGS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, VOL. 18, pp. 283-286; Streeter: BIBLIOGRAPHY OF TEXAS, 1795-1845, Vol. 2, p.106; Gomez: LEGENDARY LOCALS OF JERSEY CITY, Arcadia Publishing: 2014, p.14; Woodman: GUIDE TO TEXAS EMIGRANTS, 1835, p.179.] Streeter notes that "the sale of scrip to finance a company promoting the sale of Texas land was first undertaken in the summer of 1829...[T]his certificate merely gives the holder the right to locate a certain area of land on the grants of the Galveston Bay Company and does not purport to give the holder any further interest...At the end is a provision that the location of the land is to be under the supervision of the agent 'residing on the land' of the Trustees." A Commissioner thereafter would issue title "subject to the payments required by the Laws of the State." Streeter suspects the possibility of fraud on the part of the Trustees. Streeter, Texas 1117.

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[Texas]:
GALVESTON BAY & TEXAS LAND COMPANY
Broadside, 8" x 12.5", bottom edge untrimmed. Engraved land Certificate, decorated, printed in several different typesettings. The Certificate number and Anthony Dey's name are in manuscript. As with all the Certificates examined by Streeter, the trustees Anthony Dey, George Curtis and William H. Sumner sign in ink, as does the secretary, W.H. Willson. Engraved illustration of two cherubs at top right corner, decorative sidebar at left margin with certificate information. Small map of southeastern Texas engraved in lower left corner with shaded area showing where available property is located. Anthony Dey's signature endorsing the Certificate is also on the verso. Very Good to Near Fine. The Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company "was the first commercial effort in the United States to emulate Stephen Austin's plans to colonize Texas" [Beinecke Library collection of Anthony Dey Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company Records online]. The Company was organized in New York on October 16, 1830 by three attorneys: Anthony Dey [1776-1859] [president], and George Curtis [1799-1884] and William H. Sumner [1780-1861] [as trustees]. Dey was also a director of the New Jersey Railroad and a prominent Jersey real estate investor. Curtis, a Union College graduate, became a prominent New York lawyer; Sumner, the son of Massachusetts Governor Increase Sumner, was a prominent Boston lawyer who served in the Massachusetts State Legislature; was aide-de-camp to Governors Caleb Strong and John Brooks from 1816-1818. Willson, from Boston, lived in San Jacinto, Galveston Bay, around 1833 or 1834. [PROCEEDINGS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, VOL. 18, pp. 283-286; Streeter: BIBLIOGRAPHY OF TEXAS, 1795-1845, Vol. 2, p.106; Gomez: LEGENDARY LOCALS OF JERSEY CITY, Arcadia Publishing: 2014, p.14; Woodman: GUIDE TO TEXAS EMIGRANTS, 1835, p.179.] Streeter notes that "the sale of scrip to finance a company promoting the sale of Texas land was first undertaken in the summer of 1829...[T]his certificate merely gives the holder the right to locate a certain area of land on the grants of the Galveston Bay Company and does not purport to give the holder any further interest...At the end is a provision that the location of the land is to be under the supervision of the agent 'residing on the land' of the Trustees." A Commissioner thereafter would issue title "subject to the payments required by the Laws of the State." Streeter suspects the possibility of fraud on the part of the Trustees; he does not comment on Mexico's Bustamante Decree of April 1830, Article 11 of which "prohibited that emigrants, from nations bordering on this republic shall settle in the states or territory adjacent to their own nation. Consequently, all contracts not already completed and not in harmony with this law are suspended. Streeter, Texas 1117.

Price: $850.00
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Rotch, William Jr. :
SHIPPING ACCOUNT BOOK OF PROMINENT WHALING COMPANY WILLIAM ROTCH, JR. & SON OF NEW BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS, FOR TRANSACTIONS 1808-1815.
Folio ledger, 8 1/4" x 13 1/4". Original brushed leather with tooled borders and tooled spine pattern [some rubbing, boards detached but present], gilt lettered red morocco spine label. Unlined laid paper bearing watermark "PW" with the image of an eagle. About 178 pages completed in neat ink manuscript with incoming and outgoing records reversed on opposite sides of the ledger, and about [150] unnumbered pages left blank in the center. 132 hand numbered pages of outward cargo invoices (1808-1818), and [46] unnumbered pages of inward cargo invoices (1809-1815). Light age toning of some pages, a few loose but present. Very Good. The Rotches of Nantucket and New Bedford were an affluent Quaker family, vital in the development of their communities as centers of the whaling industry. William Rotch, Jr. [1759-1850], to whom this ledger belonged, was the grandson of Joseph Rotch [1704-1784]. Joseph came to Salem from England as a young man, and moved to Nantucket in 1725 where he became a Quaker and prominent leader of his church. In Nantucket he entered the whaling industry and owned the well-known international whaling firm Joseph Rotch & Sons. He relocated to New Bedford in 1765, but the business remained in Nantucket until 1791 when William Jr., having taken over the business after his grandfather's death, moved the firm to New Bedford. William Jr. owned the Dartmouth, the first whale oil ship launched in Bedford Village and one of the vessels boarded by the Boston Tea Parties in 1773 when his Uncle Francis was the managing owner. William Jr. and his sons [William R., Joseph, and Thomas] owned or financially supported the following businesses between 1787-1896: William Rotch Jr. & Sons, William R. Rotch & Company, Rotch Wharf Company, Rotch Candle House, and New Bedford Cordage Company. Sons Joseph and Thomas also operated as family agents in Philadelphia, and several Rotches held interest in local banks and textile mills. William Rotch, Jr., like several other Rotch men, built a large home in New Bedford. Its plain exterior hid an impressive custom-designed interior in order to conform to Quaker guidelines modesty. The house is now a registered National Historic Landmark under the US National Park Service. William Jr. was a pacifist and abolitionist with a devotion to education; he established the Friends Academy in New Bedford. By 1828 he, his father, and brother-in-law were the wealthiest men in the City. Transactions recorded in this ledger include incoming shipments of sugar, coffee, rice, iron, bales of cotton, green seed cotton, Nicaragua wood, hemp, sailcloth, tobacco, wood, hides, and other goods; outgoing shipments of whale oil, spermaceti oil [head matter oil], spermaceti candles, medicinal spermaceti, winter pressed oil, elephant oil, whale bone, cordage, hoop iron, Swedes iron, bars of Russia iron, horse hides and other items. Examples of entries: Page 22 - spermaceti candles were destroyed by fire; Page 32 - 1600 horse hides shipped to New York, 250 eaten by worms; Page 59 - bundles of yellow nankin [sturdy cotton cloth] sent to Lisbon and later returned because prohibited there; Page 63 - parcel marked # can be recommended as oil of superior quality for gentlemen's glass lamps, and other parcel equal to Nantucket oil. Several pages have signatures of captains for receipt of goods consigned to them aboard their vessels, i.e., pages 26 [Samuel Church], 69 [Gideon Randall, Ship Barclay], 89 [Jonathan Card], 94 [Cornelius S. Howland, Schooner Clipper], and 108 [Jacob Almy] . Some other ships mentioned: Sloop Sophia under Seth Presbury, Schooner Sun under Richard West, Brig Indian Chief under Joseph H. Allen, and Sloop Rosetta under Master Samuel Chadwick. The Ship Barclay, while Gideon Randall was its owner, was captured in March 1813 by the Peruvian Corsair Nereyda [allied with Britain in the War of 1812] near Lima. Captain David Porter was despatched to Lima and recovered the Barclay on April 5, 1813. [https://museudabaleia-newbedford.org/explore/library/finding-aids/mss2; http://destinationnewbedford.org/history; "When Whales Made Kings" by Christopher Klein, dated 6/28/2009, accessed at the website of the Boston Globe; http://www.southcoasttoday.com/article/20080720/LIFE/807200313.]

Price: $2,000.00
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[Alabama Democratic Party]:
AT A MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRATS, CALLED TO MEET THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FOR CONSULTATION, A MOTION WAS MADE AND UNANIMOUSLY ADOPTED THAT THE FOLLOWING SPEECH, DELIVERED BY E.L. RUSSELL, AT THE RATIFICATION MEETING ON SATURDAY NIGHT, JULY 14, 1888, BE PUBLISHED AS A CAMPAIGN DOCUMENT.
8pp. Title as stated. Browned uniformly, light blank extremity chipping, stitched. Good+. A call for everyone to vote Democratic in the upcoming presidential election. The Democratic Party "is struggling with all its power to protect the people of this country from the oppression of the combinations, the monopolies and the great trusts; the party whose policy is to prevent the money from being hoarded in the United States Treasury, but to keep it in circulation, that it may be employed in all channels of commerce..." Vote for Grover Cleveland, and turn out Republicans' "corrupting influences and arbitrary use of power." Not located on OCLC as of September 2017, or in Ellison.

Price: $150.00
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Cohen, Alfred A.:
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, IN AND FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO. ANTHONY EGL ET ALS. PLAINTIFFS VS. THE CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY, DEFENDANTS. COMPLAINT.
8pp, sewn, original printed wrappers [light toning], Very Good. Cohen was a leader of California's early Jewish community, a prominent attorney, and a railroad promoter. Here he takes on the Central Pacific Railroad, charging in this derivative suit that the Railroad-- acting through its Directors Stanford, Huntington, and Hopkins-- illegally purchased the capital stock of the California Pacific Railroad Company and then, in an effort to bankrupt it, refused to pay interest due on bonds issued by that company. Rocq 9271.

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Pickering, Timothy:
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, TO JUDGE MARCH, DATED AT WASHINGTON, D.C., JANUARY 16, 1806, DISCUSSING THE ARCHITECTURE OF COURTS IN MASSACHUSETTS, WITH REMARKS ABOUT FRENCH COURTS; AND HIS DISSATISFACTION WITH THE ONGOING CONGRESSIONAL SESSION AND PRESIDENT JEFFERSON.
Large quarto wove bifolium inscribed over two pages. 9-1/2" x 7-1/2". To Judge March, likely on the north shore of Massachusetts, regarding the organization of spectators in the courts in France, and mentioning the business of Congress. Old folds, some math equations on the outer blank verso. Very Good. In 1806 the Federalist Pickering was U.S. Senator from Massachusetts. A Revolutionary War veteran, he had previously served in the Washington and Adams Administrations as, variously, Secretary of War, Postmaster General, and Secretary of State. His Letter criticizes the layout of Massachusetts courts and compares them unfavorably with those in France. "Whenever there is an interesting cause, the justices & gentlemen of the bar & the witnesses, are obliged to struggle thro' the crowd." Pickering has suggested to Sheriff Bartlett the construction of "a passage behind the intended Bench for the judges, by which the gentlemen of the bar might get to their places, with ease, and without the bustle & noise which now frequently occur. But Mr. Bartlett deemed the provision of little or no consequence." Pickering also expresses frustration about President Jefferson and the Congressional session. "Congress have yet done nothing, tho' we are now in the 7th week of the session! The President's message, in which many thought they saw a spirit like that of foretimes, appeared to me, from the beginning, pregnant with an abortion. The Mountain in labour will scarcely produce a mouse. The only measure of any consequence yet agitated, will terminate in further National Degradation. I cannot at present be more explicit." Judge March is Ebenezer March who was appointed to the Court of Common Pleas in 1796; Timothy Pickering was appointed Chief Justice of that Court in 1802. Ebenezer March [1745-1827] was born and died in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was elected to represent Newbury in the State Constitutional Convention in September 1779, and re-elected the following May to participate in the examination of the resulting returns. He was later elected Senator to the General Court from Newbury for four sessions; served on the committee to build a new courthouse in Newburyport from 1803-1805; was President of the Board of Dummer Academy in Massachusetts for more than 20 years; and participated in many other civic activities. [Arrington: MUNICIPAL HISTORY OF ESSEX COUNTY… VOL. II. New York: 1922, pp.839-841; RESOLVES OF THE GENERAL COURT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS… 1800, p.129; Currier: HISTORY OF NEWBURY, MASS. 1635-1902, Boston: 1902, pp.289-292; Hudgins & Cromley: SHAPING COMMUNITIES, VOLUME 1. Univ. of Tenn.: 1997, p.86.]

Price: $875.00
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Kollner, A[ugustus]:
THE CHILDS BOOK OF ANIMALS. THE LION. THE DUCK. THE ROOSTER. THE SHEEP. THE TROUT. THE JAGUAR.
American Sunday School Union. A. Kollner Lithy. Phila. H. Camp's Lith. Press., Philadelphia:, [1847-1851]
Oblong folio, 11-1/2" x 9-1/8". [6] leaves of text, [6] wood- engraved plates of the animals noted in the title. Plates and text on facing pages. Elaborate pictorial title wrappers, lithographed by Augustus Kollner and John H. Camp. Rear wrapper advertises "Valuable books for children and youth with fine plates and engravings in large varieties. Published by the American Sunday-School Union..." Lettering on front and rear wrappers surrounded by illustrations of animals. Plate of the Lion signed 'R.S. Gilbert'; Plates of the Trout and Jaguar signed 'Gilbert'. Complete, moderately foxed, mildly worn. One plate partially and neatly colored. Good+. "Augustus Kollner, born 1812 in Wurttemberg, Germany, was a distinguished 19th-century Philadelphia artist, etcher, engraver, and lithographer who started his career in the arts in Germany. Kollner worked as an engraver of book illustrations and animal portraiture in Stutgart by 1828 and in Paris during the 1830s before he immigrated to the United States and Washington, D.C. in 1839. In D.C., he worked at the Haas firm and lithographed advertisements, bank notes, and cityscape views until he relocated to Philadelphia in 1840. In his new city of residence, he established a studio as a portrait painter. Between 1847 and 1848, Kollner became the artist for the lithographic firm Brechemin & Camp (Phoenix Block, Second and Dock streets) where he designed all genres of lithographs... He also assumed a partnering role with John H. Camp following the retirement of Louis Brechemin. During this time Kollner had also relocated his residence to 239 Arch Street, where he lived ca. 1848-ca. 1854. "The new partnership lasted to ca. 1851 during which time the men issued a number of advertisements promoting their collaboration and Kollner began his work for the American Sunday School Union. He contributed a number of plates for their children's' moral lesson books such as 'City Sights for Country Eyes' (1856). The lithographs created by pen and ink were atypical for American pictorial lithography and often included Kollner's expertise in the delineation of horses." [Web site Library Company of Philadelphia, Augustus Kollner]. Rare. FIRST EDITION. OCLC 191234898 [2- AAS, Free Lib. Phila.], 701778666 [2- Yale, AAS], 32835650 [1- UCLA] as of June 2017.

Price: $3,500.00
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White Boys in Blue:
IN THE NAME AND BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE WHITE BOYS IN BLUE OF COLUMBUS, OHIO.
Broadside membership certificate, printed in blue typescript and completed in manuscript, with attractive illustration of American Flag and Screaming Eagle. Alexander McCoy is elected "an HONORARY MEMBER of the WHITE BOYS IN BLUE OF COLUMBUS, OHIO." He is thus expected "to subscribe to such principles as adopted in our Constitution and By-Laws." Dated in manuscript December 1, 1868; signed in ink by the Colonel Commanding [Isaac H. Marrow, a veteran of the 3d Ohio Infantry], the Adjutant [J.N. Miller], and the Secretary [H.J. Feltus, who served in several Indiana regiments]. Expert reinforcement on blank verso to horizontal folds. Decorative border. Very Good. The 'White Boys in Blue' was a post-Civil war organization comprised of former Union soldiers who favored Andrew Johnson's mild Reconstruction policy. Its adherents supported the Seymour-Blair 1868 presidential ticket, and opposed the Republican Party and Congressional Reconstruction. It was especially active in Indiana and Ohio. "Its influence is pernicious, and its designs are believed to be to restore rebels to power and demand for the South full reparation for all damages occasioned by the war, and if it can, to compel the nation to pay the rebel debt, but first to repudiate our own national debt. It invites to its membership all soldiers opposed to the National Congress and the lawful government of the United States... They embellish the dogmas of their with extenuations and justifications for the 'lost cause,' and justify the barbarous cruelties of Andersonville prison pen." [Wilson, THE GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC UNDER ITS FIRST CONSTITUTION AND RITUAL. ITS BIRTH AND ORGANIZATION 141. Kansas City: 1905].

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Virginia Confederate Presidential Election Ticket:
FOR PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS, OF MISSISSIPPI. FOR VICE PRESIDENT ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS, OF GEORGIA. ELECTORAL TICKET FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT. FOR THE STATE AT LARGE. JOHN R. EDMUNDS, HALIFAX. ALLENT T. CAPERTON, MONROE...
Small broadside ticket, 3" x 4-3/4". Very good. A rare Virginia Confederate electoral ticket for the Confederacy's first and only national election: Jefferson Davis for President, Alexander Stephens for Vice President. Also listed are two at-large electors, and sixteen others by District. Variant of Parrish & Willingham 5367, 5368; Crandall 2744 [noting "four variant printings and sizes"]; and Hummel 4667-4669. OCLC 58833485 [2- U GA, Boston Ath.], 702707722 [1- Yale] as of June 2017 [different dimensions].

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Indiana Election of 1864:
POLL BOOK AND TALLY SHEET OF RICHLAND TOWNSHIP, RUSH COUNTY, INDIANA, FOR THE 1864 GUBERNATORIAL ELECTION BETWEEN JOSEPH MCDONALD AND OLIVER P. MORTON, AND OTHER STATE OFFICES.
Folio, 8 ˝" x 14". [8] pp, folded, with one small slip of an additional page loose. Poll Book preprinted with introduction, columns and headings, names of candidates, etc. Completed in neat ink manuscript. The first page contains an introduction at the top half, followed by names of voters up through #232 on page [4] and an additional five voters listed on the slip. At page [5] is the pre-printed certification filled in and signed by three officers, followed by a list of both preprinted and added names of all those on the election ticket and the offices they seek, with number of votes received by each in manuscript. The final page contains the docketing information. Signed by Jacob Fisher, Thompson Patterson, and Thos. Butler, and filed on October 13, 1864. Quite clean. Very Good. [with] Tally Paper. 17" x 28". Preprinted with heading, columns, and names of candidates and offices they seek. Some additional candidates added in manuscript, with manuscript tallies and calculations. Light age toning, old folds with a few short splits at corner folds, some spotting and dustsoiling of verso. At the head of the document are the signatures of Jacob Fisher, Thompson Patterson, and Thos. Butler, judges; and Thomas Powell, clerk. Very Good. During the 1864 gubernatorial election, Oliver P. Morton ran on the Union ticket against Democrat Joseph McDonald. Morton had been elected Lt. Governor under Gov. Henry Lane in 1860. Lane resigned two days after being confirmed in January, 1861, so that he could take a seat in the U.S. Senate; Morton succeeded to his office. Morton won the election by more than 20,000 votes. Names of the 232 who voted include: J.H. Scott, George Greenfogle, Archibald Clardy, W.C. Stewart, D.L. Burt, Jno. S. Stewart, Preston Smith, Alex Fisher, Timothy Bowen, Zefeniah Marshall, A.W. Johnson, J.W. Logan, E.W. Barnes, Jno. Smith, J.A. Miller, David Reid, W.M. McCo7y, Jno. Stewart, Corn Vanorsdall, and many more. Jacob Fisher [1824-1894] appears to have worked as a teacher in the town's early log schoolhouse and later at the Richland Academy which was chartered in 1855. He also served as the Trustee of the township from 1859 until approximately 1879. [HISTORY OF RUSH COUNTY, INDIANA... 1888, pages 830-831.] Others who signed off on these documents as judges and clerks were primarily farmers.

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Indiana Election of 1864:
POLL BOOK AND TALLY SHEET OF NOBLE TOWNSHIP, RUSH COUNTY, INDIANA, FOR THE 1864 GUBERNATORIAL ELECTION BETWEEN JOSEPH MCDONALD AND OLIVER P. MORTON, AND THE OTHER STATE OFFICES AND JUDGESHIPS.
Folio, 8 ˝" x 14". [16] pp, folded. Poll Book preprinted with introduction, columns and headings, names of candidates, etc. First [5] pages and final [4] pages completed in neat ink manuscript. The first page contains an introduction at the top half, followed by names of voters up through #279 on page [5]. At page [13] is the pre-printed certification filled in and signed by three officers, followed by a list of both preprinted and added names of those on the election ticket and the offices they seek, with number of votes received by each in manuscript. The final page contains the docketing information. Signed by Andrew Griffin, David McKee and John D. Dource, and filed on October 13, 1864. Quite clean. Very Good. [with] Tally Paper. 17" x 28". Preprinted with heading, columns, and names of candidates and offices they seek. Some additional candidates added in manuscript, with manuscript tallies and calculations. Old folds with a few short splits at corner folds, a few splits repaired with archival tape on verso, some soiling of verso. At the head of the document are the signatures of Andrew Griffin, David McKee and John D. Dource, judges; and Benjamin F. Reeve and J.R. Hunt, clerks. Tally sheet docketed on verso as filed October 13, 1864, by B.F. Tingley, Clerk. Very Good. During Indiana's 1864 gubernatorial election, Oliver P. Morton ran on the Union ticket against Democrat Joseph McDonald. Morton had been elected Lt. Governor under Gov. Henry Lane in 1860. Lane resigned two days after being confirmed in January, 1861, so that he could take a seat in the U.S. Senate; Morton succeeded to his office. Morton won the election by more than 20,000 votes. Names of the 279 who voted include: Lewis Smith, Bradford Z. Norris, John B. Reeve, Owen Reynolds, John W.N. Hunt, William Carney, Henry Long, Hiram Smith, Henry Armstrong, John Ryan, Thomas N. Smith, George W. Brown, David Johnson, Alexander FitzJarrell, William Quail, Francis M. Patterson, George Gray, Lorenso D. Richardson, Richard W. McKee. Benjamin F. Tingley [1823-1904] served as the Clerk of Rush County from 1864 to 1872, and he was a member of the local Freemason lodge where he held the position of treasurer for a time. Others who signed off on these documents as judges and clerks were primarily farmers by occupation.

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[Western Mining]:
COLLECTION OF 35 WESTERN MINING DOCUMENTS INCLUDING ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION, ASSAY CERTIFICATES, RECEIPTS, DRAFTS.
Documents of many different sizes, 1/2" x 7" to 13" x 21". Light dust, occasional scattered spotting. A few items have folds with some splits [no loss]. Very Good. The documents concern mining companies in Nevada and California, plus a few from Colorado, Arizona and Montana. Several companies in the Nevada Territory and California had claims in the Comstock Lode. CALIFORNIA: [1] Certification of filing Articles of Incorporation of the Imperial Gold Mining Company of San Francisco, with starting capital of $100,000. Preprinted form completed in neat ink manuscript with names of officers (Henry C. Blake, W.F. Bogart, J.B. Treadwell, A.J. Shrader, D.L. and signatures of Thomas Beck, Secretary of State and Wm. A. Beck, Deputy, dated 1/9/1878, with large gilt seal, measures 16" x 21"; [2] Hussy Mine Report, typed, dated 6/12/1880, 4pp, held with metal clasps at head. Describes Nevada County, California, mine including location, tunnels, gold yield and quality. (This may be typed version of 11 page manuscript described at OCLC 79446888); [3] M.M. Sexton, T.C. Stallo & O.M. Broms, Manuscript Notice of Mining Claim for the "Rissell opposite the Store at Temperance Flat for the purpose of erecting a wheel and machinery for a Quartz Mill," signed at Millerton on 8/1/57 and docketed on verso. [4] Thomas Price's Assay Office and Chemical Laboratory, Memorandum of gold bullion deposit, dated 4/24/1879; [5] Chemical Laboratory Assay Offices, Bullion Rooms & Ore Floors - with Thomas Price as Analytical Chemist, Assayer and Bullion Melter, memorandum of bullion deposit dated 7/24/1882; [6] Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express, receipt dated 7/29/1880, $3900 in gold bars addressed to "W.F. & Co. San Fran. for assay;" [7] Palmer & Day's Assay Office, receipt dated 3/13/1862 for 73.21 oz. of gold dust; [8] Selby Smelting & Lead Co., three memoranda of gold bullion deposit dated 5/1/1882 for 406 oz., 9/29/1890 for 7.02 oz. & 82.85 oz.; [9] Mountaineer Gold Mining Co., payment receipt dated 9/7/1868 for $125.00 to C.W. Hendel for one year service as Secretary; [10] T.P. Crandall of Crandall & McKillican, Provisions, Mining Supplies, Etc., 8/13/1888, draft payable to Buckeye Mill Co., $147.06 with signature endorsements on verso; [11] Kellogg & Humbert's Assay Office, 9/28/1858, gold bullion deposit no. 5282; [12] Rufus Butterfield, San Francisco, 10/26/1852, receipt for $134.63 on goods shipped from New York on "Ships 'Racer,'" "Milch of the Mare," and "Gray Hound." NEVADA: [13] Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company, 7 receipts for gold & silver ore dated 1863-1864 in two different styles and 2 receipts for labor payments from 1862 and 1864 [$2000 for "working one [?]" and $175 for "labor on Moor Ranch;" [14] Goldfield Consolidated Mines Co., dated June 1911, Sheet No. 6, employee nos. 201-239; [15] Manhattan Silver Mining Company of Nevada, payment receipt dated 7/8/1875 in the amount of $140; [16] Van Wyck & Co. Assay Office, receipt for 2229.5 ounces of bouillon dated 7/14/1864 deposited by Savage M. Co.; [17] Savage Mining Company, voucher dated 2/3/1892 for $32.50 paid to Wells Fargo & Co. for expressage of 1780.5 lbs. of amalgam from Nevada Mill to U.S. Mint in Carson City; [18] Savage Gold & Silver Mining Company, receipt dated 1864 for supplies bought of White's Canon Mill [preprinted with both companies' names]; [19] U.S. Mint at Carson City, memorandum of silver and gold bullion deposit, dated 11/6/1890; [20] Mexican Mill, manuscript statement of F.S. Bars manufactured in payment of H & N deposit written on preprinted undated form of the U.S. Mint at Carson, Cashier's Office; [21] White & Murphy Gold and Silver Mining Company, receipt dated 2/28/1864 for "merchandise." MONTANA: [22] North Butte Mining Company, Check to Jas. McMillen, $23.50 written on First National Bank of Butte. ARIZONA: [23] Bank of Bisbee, two drafts dated 7/11/1905, Nos. A7069 payable to Jose Estrada for $6.75 in Mexican Silver Dollars and A7070 payable to Pedro Rivera for in Mexican Silver Dollars, with endorsements and perforated, rubber and paper stamps on verso. COLORADO: [24] The Eagle Ore Company, original and carbon of receipt of 15520 pounds of gold & silver valued at $270.18. Gould & Curry Silver Mining was organized in June 1860; Manhattan Silver Mining Company of Nevada was established in 1863; and the Goldfield Consolidated Mines Co. was organized in November 1906. The U.S. Mint at Carson City was created in 1863 and operated from 1870-1885 and from 1889-1893 when its doors finally closed. It was established specifically to facilitate the minting of silver coins from silver in the Comstock Lode, although it also minted some gold coins. Charles Hendel [1831-1920] came to California in 1853 and began mining for gold in Sierra County, later serving as the county's surveyor, as a U.S. Deputy Surveyor, and as Plumas County Surveyor. He owned a large interest in the Alturas Tailing Mine and the Lucky Gold Hill Mine. [Guide to the Charles William Hendel Collection, 1853-1918, 662-701, California State Library.]

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[South Carolina]:
A NEW MANUAL OF PRIVATE DEVOTIONS. IN THREE PARTS.
Printed and Sold at J. Hoff's Wholesale and Retail Book-Store, Charleston, (S.C.):, 1810
428, [4] pp. Lacking the front free endpaper, foxed lightly to moderately. Bound in original sheep with gilt spine rules and gilt-lettered spine title on black morocco. Good+. Originally published in London, this is the first American edition. The last three pages lists more than one hundred Subscribers, most of them women [from some of South Carolina's first families: Gadsden, Huger, Legare, Lowndes, Pinckney], plus a few male ministers [including John Witherspoon]. The Manual is divided into three parts: Prayers for Families and Private Persons; "Containing Offices. I. Of Humiliation. II. For the Sick. III. For Women with Child"; and "An Office for the Holy Communion. FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. AI 20878 [4]. OCLC 228693576 [6], 24727611 [2] as of June 2017. Not in Turnbull.

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Wedgwood, Josiah:
WEDGWOOD TILE OF THE SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' MONUMENT IN BOSTON WITH THE INSCRIPTION TAKEN FROM THE MONUMENT ITSELF.
Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, [Boston:, c 1883]
6" x 6", ceramic tile with brown sepia transfer depicting the renowned Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument on Boston Common, commemorating the defenders of the Union in the Civil War. Depictinglines of trees on either side of the monument and printing the full inscription from the monument. On the back of the tile is the raised imprint "JOSIAH WEDGWOOD & SONS ETRURIA." Light wear around the edges, with little wear to the transfer itself. Very Good.

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Sanborn Map & Publishing Company:
WATERTOWN, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS.
Sanborn Map Company, New York:, Feby 1923
Elephant folio, 13" x 21". [74] pp, making up 37 two-page full color maps. The title is taken from the first map, as issued. Original brown paper-covered boards with cloth spine [boards a bit warped, rubbing and wear]. Maps brightly colored, clean and crisp [last map has some foxing]. Very Good. All Sanborn works are rare, having been published in small numbers for the exclusive use of property insurance companies and underwriters. Painstakingly prepared from public records and the Sanborn Company's own surveying and research, a Sanborn work presents the most detailed pictorial history obtainable of an urban area. OCLC 78780671 [Harvard Univ.] as of June 2, 2017.

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[Wells, Henry; and James C. Fargo]:
INTERESTING TO EXPRESS SHIPPERS! "DEATH IN THE LAST DITCH!" HOW REGARDED BY "AMERICAN" STOCKHOLDERS. OFFICE OF THE AMERICAN EXPRESS CO. NO. 122 & 124 BROADWAY, N.Y. FEBRUARY 15, 1867.
Broadside, 6-3/4" x 13-1/4". Printed in two columns. Light horizontal fold, mild toning, Very Good. This is a rare, evidently unrecorded, and interesting broadside illuminating the cutthroat competition for domination of the express trade. Henry Wells, President of the American Express Company, and James C. Fargo, its Assistant Treasurer, announce that the Company has decided to "omit the usual quarterly dividend." Instead, the Company will devote all its earnings to the struggle against The Merchants' Union Express, "an organization formed to black-mail this and other established Express Companies." Wells and Fargo promise "to expend every dollar of its current and surplus earnings, and if necessary to assess its stockholders, to ensure COMPLETE AND LASTING VICTORY." These founders of the Wells, Fargo Company formed the American Express Company in 1850. Their decision did not sit well with at least two stockholders whose objections are printed in this broadside. Charles P. Wood writes that "your policy was conceived in folly, is adhered to in mere desperation, and should be abandoned at once." Wells and Fargo have begun "a war in a spirit so autocratic and imperious, that you created alarm throughout every commercial community..." Norris Winslow concurs: "The generous support given from all quarters to the Merchants' Union Express Company, is conclusive evidence that the American people have no sympathy with a Company that publicly say they will destroy legitimate competition, or 'die in the attempt'." Not located on OCLC or the online sites of AAS, Huntington, NYPL, NYHS, Harvard, Yale, U TX as of June 2017.

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Marylander, A:
LETTERS TO GOV. BRADFORD, BY A MARYLANDER.
21pp. Disbound, else Very Good. The anonymous Confederate sympathizer writes to "the Governor of what was once the State of Maryland." Governor Bradford owes his position to "armed power," and "illegal and despotic measures," thanks to his "endorsement of the principles and policy of Mr. Lincoln and his party." Dissent is prohibited. Marylander's several letters expose the tyranny of Bradford's administration and that of the national government. Bartlett 2672. Sabin 45398. Not in Monaghan.

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[Shelton, Philo S.]:
THE LAW OF SPECIAL REPRISALS.
30, 4 pp. Disbound. Title page toned at the margins; mild occasional foxing. Clipped ink inscription at head of title page. Good+. This learned lawyer's brief was prompted by a dispute over the ownership of so-called Aves Island, "a speck of sand in the central Caribbean, 1,230 feet by 160 feet, that supports a few scrubby bushes"; "a mere clump of stone barely extending above the high-tide line" [http://www.geocurrents.info/geopolitics/when-is-an-island-not-an-island-caribbean-maritime-disputes]. It was submitted to the State Department on behalf of Philo S. Shelton and his associates, seeking redress for an "unparalleled outrage" perpetrated by Venezuela. Claiming ownership of the island-- unjustifiably, according to the claimants-- which had enormous quantities of valuable guano, Venezuela had expelled Shelton et al from Aves and prohibited their extraction of the guano. They seek redress under established principles of international law. A Treaty between the United States and Venezuela, executed in 1859 and ratified in 1861, concluded the dispute by Venezuela's payment of moneys to Shelton and his firm. Sabin 80153 [not collating the 4pp Appendix at the end]. OCLC 29809316 [5] as of June 2017.

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Hall, A. Oakey:
HORACE GREELEY DECENTLY DISSECTED, IN A LETTER ON HORACE GREELEY, ADDRESSED BY A. OAKEY HALL TO JOSEPH HOXIE, ESQ., REPUBLISHED (WITH AN ALPHABET OF NOTES) BY POPULAR REQUEST.
Ross & Tousey, New York:, 1862
38pp, disbound, a few fox marks. Good+. A thorough and detailed attack on Greeley's political positions, particularly his view that the 'erring sister' slave states should be permitted to depart from the Union in peace. Sabin 29712.

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Reed, William B.:
A PAPER CONTAINING A STATEMENT AND VINDICATION OF CERTAIN POLITICAL OPINIONS. READ BEFORE THE DEMOCRATIC ASSOCIATION, CHESTNUT HILL, NOV. 1862.
John Campbell, Philadelphia:, 1862
32pp, disbound. Light scattered foxing. Good+. A prominent Philadelphia Whig who became a Buchanan Democrat and then Buchanan's Minister to China, Reed bitterly opposed Lincoln's conduct of the War. Favoring recognition of the Confederacy, he details here the hardships that he suffered because of his political opinions, and the Administration's abandonment of the First Amendment. He insists that he grounds his dissenting views solely on principle rather than kinship or emotional ties to the Confederacy. He advocates action by "the great Middle States" to end the War on terms of compromise. If the North is successful, the Nation will become "a centralized domination with all the heresies of the day engrafted." Reed publishes correspondence with former Supreme Court Justice Campbell confirming that Seward had told Campbell, a Confederate Commissioner sent to negotiate for federal forts, that Union troops would evacuate Fort Sumter. FIRST EDITION. Bartlett 4044. Sabin 68617. Not in LCP or Monaghan.

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[Ignatius]:
THE TRUTH, THE WHOLE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. ADDRESSED TO THE REV. CAVE JONES; AND RECOMMENDED TO THE CONSIDERATION OF ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. NEW-YORK, FEBRUARY 10, 1812.
22, [2] pp. Stitched, untrimmed. Publishers' announcements on back page. Signed in type at page 21 "Ignatius." Scattered foxing and spotting, minor dusting and wear of outer leaves. Good+. [offered with] [Hobart, John Henry] REMARKS ON THE HON. JOHN JAY'S LETTER, TO THE REV. CAVE JONES; IN A LETTER TO A FRIEND. NEW-YORK, JANUARY 29, 1812. [New York] February, 1812. Stitched, untrimmed. Publishers' announcements on back page. Minor wear. Authorship is attributed to Rev. Hobart by Dix, HISTORY OF THE PARISH OF TRINITY CHURCH... New York: 1901, p.321, footnote 2. Very Good. Details of the controversy between Cave Jones and New York's Trinity Parish, an Episcopal Church, were eagerly devoured by the public, with much airing of personal animosity among the involved clergymen. Underlying the dispute was the question of the Church's future course: Anglicanism's "high church" style, emphasizing tradition and priestly authority; or the "low church" style of American Protestantism, with little emphasis on ritual, sacraments, or clergy authority. In this pamphlet the author denounces Rev. Jones for dishonoring his "Mother" [the church]."You Sir, are a Presbyter of the Episcopal Church, to whose service you have solemnly devoted yourself... And what have you done? You have not only debased and degraded your own character... You have held her up to the public, as an object of abhorrence and detestation... You have insulted your aged and venerable Bishop, and in so gross a manner, as to have realized the fable of the Old Lion and the Ass." Rev. John Hobart became an assistant minister of Trinity Church on September 8, 1800, at the age of twenty-four. A follower of the "high church," he was intolerant of dissenters. Cave Jones became an assistant minister of Trinity Church on January 12, 1801. He was more of a "low church" minister. The two clashed. After Benjamin Moore, Rector of Trinity Parish and Bishop of New York, became ill in 1811, Moore called for a convention to elect an Assistant Bishop and eyed Hobart for the job. But Jones issued a pamphlet on May 1, 1811, attacking Hobart's "tyranny and intolerance." Nevertheless, Hobart was elected. A pamphlet war ensued. Later in 1811 the Vestry and a clerical court-- headed by Bishop Moore-- removed Jones from office. Jones took the case to civil court on the ground that the clerical court did not have authority to fire him. Although the court upheld the dismissal, it ordered Trinity to pay Jones. During the dispute, various parties published eighteen pamphlets. ["The Pamphlet Wars," September 04, 2012; Trinity Church Wall Street, accessed at www.trinitywallstreet.org; "The Cave Jones Controversy," Bridgeman and Morehouse: A HISTORY OF THE PARISH OF TRINITY CHURCH IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK... CHAPTER XIX. Putnam: 1901, pp. 209-227.] Sabin 97267. AI 26922 [7]; Sabin 32298. AI 26589 [4].

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[New York Elections of 1832]:
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICAN NOMINATIONS. FOR GOVERNOR, FRANCIS GRANGER. FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, SAMUEL STEVENS. AND THE ELECTORAL TICKET HEADED BY JAMES KENT AND JOHN C. SPENCER. FOR MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY, PHINEAS CATLIN AND EPHRAIM LEACH. TIOGA COUNTY CONVENTION. AT A DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICAN COUNTY CONVENTION, HELD AT THE HOUSE OF HENRY MILLER, IN THE TOWN OF SPENCER, ON THE 5TH DAY OF OCTOBER, 1832, OPPOSED TO THE NATIONAL AND STATE ADMINISTRATIONS...
Folio broadside, 15-1/4" x 22". A variety of type fonts and sizes. Old folds [couple of letters affected], light spotting, couple of chips in blank portions and one affecting a portion of a letter. Good+. A rare, evidently unrecorded broadside of an anti-Jackson Convention in Tioga County on October 5, 1832. The assembly selected its slate for Governor and underticket. Chancellor Kent was one of the electors. The Convention's Address, signed in type at the end by David Lee, President; Anson Higbie, V. President; William R. Smith and Nehemiah Platt, Secretaries, warns, "At no period since the revolution has this mighty Republic been exposed to the dangers which now threaten its destruction." President Jackson has "trampled under foot almost every principle which guided the immortal Washington and Jefferson." The Convention's indictment consists of ten charges against Jackson, demonstrating his disregard of constitutional checks and balances, and conduct in violation of his own promises made during his 1828 campaign. Jackson is "guilty of conduct so hostile to the honor and interest of our country" that the people should repudiate him at the polls. Not located on OCLC or the web sites of AAS, NYPL, NYHS as of May 2017.

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[Communist Party]:
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES OCTOBER TERM 1944. HARRY BRIDGES, PETITIONER, VS. I.F. WIXON, AS DISTRICT DIRECTOR, IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE. PETITION FOR WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE NINTH CIRCUIT. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE COMMUNIST POLITICAL ASSOCIATION, BY EARL BROWDER, ITS PRESIDENT, AND WILLIAM Z. FOSTER, ITS VICE-PRESIDENT, FOR LEAVE TO INTERVENE. NOTICE OF MOTION AND MOTION FOR ORDER GRANTING LEAVE TO INTERVENE, PETITION, AND BRIEF IN SUPPORT OF MOTION. JOSEPH R. BRODSKY, ATTORNEY FOR APPLICANT, COMMUNIST POLITICAL ASSOCIATION.
The Hecla Press, [New York:, 1944]
v, [1 blank], 101, [1 blank] pp. Original staples and printed wrappers with wrapper title, as issued. Rear blank wrapper with a couple of shallow chips. Some underlining. Very Good. The Communist Party, having renamed itself the 'Communist Political Association' to emphasize its purely "political educational purposes," seeks to intervene in deportation proceedings against Harry Bridges. Bridges was the head of the International Longshoremen's Union, officially the Marine Workers' Industrial Union. A Communist born in Australia, he was considered a threat to American national security during wartime. For several years the government sought to deport him. Although juries found against him, the Supreme Court ultimately would rule in his favor. To assist Bridges, the Communist Political Association stresses its devotion to a united front for the purpose of "winning the war and securing a durable peace," thus renouncing "partisan advancement and the party form of organization." Its traditions are simply "the traditions of the labor movement," and a recognition of "the complete compatibility of the principles of Marxism with the most urgent needs of the nation as a whole." The Association opposes "forcible establishment of socialism against the will of the people." It lists 158 numbered paragraphs in support of its benign, sanitized intentions and its entitlement to intervene. Brodsky, the Association's lawyer, had defended the Scottsboro Boys and other unpopular defendants and organizations.

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[Cookery] St. Louis Stamping Company:
THE GRANITE IRON WARE COOK BOOK. ST. LOUIS STAMPING CO., ST. LOUIS, MO.
Donaldson Bros., [New York:, 1878]
12mo. 64pp. Original staples and chromolithograph pictorial wrappers [Young woman, a cow, a bucket with the St. Louis Stamping Co. logo, rustic scene on front wrap; boy and girl on the rear wrap in a comedic scene]. About Fine. Stamped on rear wrapper: 'Compliments C.J. Rumsey & Co., Wholesale and Retail Hardware, Ithaca, N.Y.' [offered with] ANOTHER COPY, with different chromolithograph pictorial wrappers, the front wrapper depicting a woman in the kitchen with her granite iron wares, the rear wrapper illustrating a boy fishing off a pier. Stamped on rear wrapper: 'Compliments of Barr Bros., Hardware and House Furnishing Goods, Ithaca, N.Y.' Testimonials [including one from Professor Silliman at Yale] dated 1877 and 1878, many photo illustrations of granite iron kitchen goods, numerous recipes. Romaine 218 [later printing].

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National Committee to Secure Justice in Rosenberg Case:
TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD. SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES OCTOBER TERM, 1951. NO. 111 JULIUS ROSENBERG AND ETHEL ROSENBERG, PETITIONERS, VS. THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. NO. 112 MORTON SOBELL, PETITIONER, VS. THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. PETITIONS FOR WRIT OF CERTIORARI AND EXHIBIT THERETO. FILED JUNE 7, 1952.
National Committee to Secure Justice in the Rosenberg Case, New York:, [1952]
Eight volumes, bound in original printed title wrappers. 1715, [3 Index] pp. Each page printed in two columns, each column numbered as a page. Oblong 8vo, 7-1/4" x 5-1/4". Stapled as issued, Near Fine. Housed in original box [light to moderate wear], with ink-written title on box spine. More than sixty years after they were executed for espionage, even after the opening of the USSR's secret Venona files, the guilt or innocence of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg remains a subject of controversy. A National Committee to Reopen the Rosenberg Case, the successor to the National Committee to Secure Justice to the Rosenbergs, is active to this day. The trial, like that of their contemporary Alger Hiss, was enveloped by early years of the Cold War. Added to the mix was the fact that the Rosenbergs were Jewish, as were their prosecutors [Irving Saypol and Roy Cohn] and the trial judge [Irving Kaufman]. There is little doubt that significant prejudicial conduct occurred at trial, including ex parte meetings with the trial judge and the introduction of inflammatory evidence which had little probative value. The National Committee published this Record "confident that the dispassionate reader will perceive the gross miscarriage of justice that cries out for redress." The Committee claims that David and Ruth Greenglass, the government's "main witnesses", were themselves spies whose testimony was tainted by their desire to avoid the death penalty. There was no documentary evidence of the Rosenbergs' guilt. Indeed, the prosecution whipped the jury into an anti-Communist frenzy; and the sentence of death was "barbaric."

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Crane, John:
AN ORATION. DELIVERED AT DOUGLASS, MONDAY, JULY 5TH, 1802. THE DAY ASSIGNED FOR CELEBRATING THE ANNIVERSARY OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE.
Daniel Greenleaf, Worcester, Massachusetts:, July 16th, 1802
23, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, with the illustrated half title. Light foxing, Very Good. Of particular interest is the unusual half title, a full-page engraved vignette of a young man, arm extended, beholding a virgin land. John Crane [1756-1836] was minister at Northbridge in Worcester County. His Oration warns against demagoguery and the pernicious influence of the French Revolution. Crane reminds his audience that the only form of government "which is consonant with reason and divine revelation" is republican government. Only republican governments maintain "an equal and exact balance between tyranny and anarchy." In foreign affairs he upholds Washington's principle of neutrality; he urges the elevation of civic virtue over party spirit, and recalls the great sacrifices made by the men of the Revolutionary Generation. AI 2097 [3]. Nichols 435.

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Fisher, Nathaniel:
A SERMON: DELIVERED AT SALEM, JANUARY 14, 1796, OCCASIONED BY THE EXECUTION OF HENRY BLACKBURN, ON THAT DAY, FOR THE MURDER OF GEORGE WILKINSON.
Printed by S. Hall, in Boston, for J. Dabney, in Salem, Boston:, 1796
21, [3 blanks] pp. Stitched, with the half title. Untrimmed, minor dusting to the half title, Near Fine. Fisher makes Blackburn an example, for the edification of the crowd, of the "usual and just effects of a wicked and profligate life." Even if Blackburn did not intend to kill Wilkinson, as Blackburn claimed, Fisher responds that "Life is too sacred a gift to be sported with; and the weapons of death are not to be used lightly and wantonly." The law's purpose, he says, "in ordering him to suffer, in this public and ignominious manner, is to alarm and deter others-- lest they should come into the same condemnation." The contemporary Diary of William Bentley recorded this ritualistic event as follows: "This day Henry Blackburn was executed upon the Neck for the Murder of George Wilkinson. He was cloathed in a white frock, & was conducted to Church at 11 A.M. & at two conducted to the Gallows by a guard of the Militia. He behaved, from some cause or other, with his usual insensibility, but not with indecency. The Rope broke, but he was senseless. He was soon hoisted again. From indispensable necessity, began the use of WINE with my food, not having heretofore used it through life." [Diary of William Bentley, January 1795, Page 170]. Evans 30424 [Shipton & Mooney have corrected Evans's collation]. Not in McDade.

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Bunyan, John:
THE JERUSALEM SINNER SAVED; OR, GOOD NEWS TO THE VILEST OF MEN: BEING AN HELP FOR DESPAIRING SOULS: SHEWING, THAT JESUS CHRIST WOULD HAVE MERCY IN THE FIRST PLACE OFFERED TO THE BIGGEST SINNERS.
Samuel Preston, Amherst [NH]:, 1798
16mo. iv, [1], 6-176 pp [as issued]. Contemporary calf. Contemporary ownership inscription of Andrew Dodge. Minor wear, Very Good. First published at London in 1688 under the title, 'Good News for the Vilest of Men.' This is the second American printing. The first American edition issued from Boston in 1733. Evans 33474.

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[Hiss, Alger]:
UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SECOND CIRCUIT. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, APPELLEE, AGAINST ALGER HISS, APPELLANT. BRIEF FOR APPELLANT.
The Hecla Press, [New York:, 1950]
Original staples and original printed wrappers with wrapper title, as issued. v, [1 blank], 125, [1 blank] pp. Wraps with some light wear, text clean. Very Good. The Hiss case was among the most politically divisive events of the Cold War. Hiss was not charged with espionage; the jury found that he had lied under oath about his Communist past, and convicted him of perjury. Proclaiming his innocence until his dying day, Hiss was a pillar of the American establishment, a former law clerk to Oliver Wendell Holmes, a trusted confidante of Dean Acheson, and one of the organizers of the United Nations. He lived long enough to be abandoned by most of his erstwhile defenders as disturbing evidence came to light over the years, particularly the release of the Soviet Union's Venona files. This brief on appeal by Hiss's lawyers is a comprehensive review of the evidence which, Hiss claims, was insufficient to convict him. The clash of Hiss and his principal accuser, Whitaker Chambers, was explosive stuff of the highest courtroom drama. Hiss's lawyers-- Robert Benjamin, Harold Rosenwald, Chester Lane, and Kenneth Simon-- made a valiant but unsuccessful effort to overturn his conviction.

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Republican Central Corresponding Committee of Clinton County:
REPUBLICAN NOMINATIONS. FOR SENATOR, JOHN M'LEAN. FOR ASSEMBLY, C. HALSEY. FOR SHERIFF, S. BURDICK, JR. FOR CORONERS, AHAZ HAYES, OF PERU. LYMAN MANLEY, OF SARANAC. SAMUEL COUCH, PLATTSBURGH, ELIJAH RANSOM. CHAZY.
Elephant folio broadside, quite attractive on bright yellow paper. 19-1/2" x 25". Ornamental border at top and bottom. An Address "To the Republican Electors of Clinton County" is printed beneath the title in six columns, dated and signed in type at the end: "October 13, 1837; St. John B.L. Skinner, Wm. F. Haile, Geo. M. Beckwith, Lemuel Stetson, E.A. Scott, Republican Central Corresponding Committee of Clinton County." Expertly reinforced horizontally on verso. Very Good. Clinton County is the most northeastern county in New York; it borders Lake Champlain. The county seat is Plattsburgh. The listed candidates were running for office in upcoming State and local elections. The Address rejoices in native son Martin Van Buren's accession to the presidency, the triumph of Jacksonian banking policies, and the people's repudiation of the National Bank-- "the partizan conduct of the bank, its unconstitutionality, and the impolicy of continuing an institution, that governed principally by a money making spirit." Not located on OCLC or the AAS online site as of May 2017.

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Scott, Winfield:
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, TO UNITED STATES SENATOR JAMES SHIELDS [ADDRESSED HERE AS 'MY DEAR GENERAL'], DECEMBER 8, 1853, FROM NEW YORK, SEEKING SHIELDS' SUPPORT FOR SCOTT'S PROMOTION TO LIEUTENANT GENERAL.
[4]pp. Single sheet folded to 5" x 8". Manuscript on three pages; addressed to 'Hon. Genl. Shields'. Light folds, a few fox marks, Very Good. Shields, a Democratic Senator from Illinois, had quarreled with Abraham Lincoln in 1842. They scheduled a duel which, fortunately, their seconds were able to abort. During the Mexican War Shields was commissioned a Brigadier General, which accounts for Scott's flattering salutation. A perennially ambitious political general, Scott had just finished running for President on the Whig ticket. "Inept and pompous" [Potter, The Impending Crisis page 142], he lost to Franklin Pierce in a landslide. Scott had first sought the presidency for the 1840 election and, according to DAB, "as late as 1860 he retained some hope of being sent to the White House." The first paragraph of his letter expresses "keen regret" at the "recent defeat of our friend Clemens." Jeremiah Clemens had been a Democratic U.S. Senator from Alabama; he lost his 1852 race to Clement Clay. "His absence from the Senate is certainly a personal loss to me, but a much greater loss to the country." Then Scott gets down to business: "I know not that you may be inclined to trouble yourself, a fourth time, with the question of the LIEUTENANT GENERALCY, but if a Bill, providing for the rank can be again carried in the Senate, at an early day, I think it may be got thro' the House (where we have had, from the beginning, a MAJORITY-) by July next, & if needed, it is believed, a good word from the President would be thrown in to prevent the sleep of death on the Speaker's table. "If you should be kind enough again to shoulder the burden, may I beg you to adopt the form [herewith enclosed] of the Joint Resolution as amended, Feb. 4. 1852, by my friend, Dr. Gwin-- with, or without the PROVISO, [of the day before] proposed by Genl Cass? In respect to the PROVISO, altho' kindly intended, I am quite indifferent; but I entreat our Michigan friend to allow the word REVIVED, in the 4th line, to stand, & not substitute for it, CREATED, as you consented to do, a year ago: 1. Because Genl. Cass is mistaken in supposing the Father of his country ever actually held the rank of lieutenant general; for he only prospectively agreed to accept it; 2. Because if he, modestly, took upon himself the inferior rank, Congress considered it a degradation, & promptly removed the indignity; 3. Because the commission that was universally considered as beneath him may be aspired to, without arrogance, by much smaller men; & 4. Because, without reviving [instead of CREATING the rank, anew] the Joint Resolution would not give to the brevet lieutenant general, under the circumstances any additional pay or allowance. This result, I am sure, cannot be desired by Genl. C. Do, therefore, I pray you, induce the general to give up his hasty objection to the word REVIVED." Scott signs the letter, "With ancient regards I remain, always yrs Winfield Scott." [capital letters substituted for the original underlines.] On December 21, 1853, Senate Joint Resolution 4 authorized the President to confer the rank of Lieutenant General by Brevet, for eminent service. The Resolution passed the Senate on February 12, 1855. President Pierce's Message to the Senate on February 28, 1855 nominated Scott to the rank of Lieutenant General retroactive to March 29, 1847, the date of his victory at Veracruz. The Senate immediately and unanimously approved the nomination; Scott quickly submitted a claim for almost $27,000 in back pay, retroactive to the effective date of his rank. His claim was approved, but only for slightly more than. [CONGRESSIONAL GLOBE, 33RD CONG., 2ND SESS., pages 690-691, 706; JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VOLUME 46, Washington: 1854, Page 420; Peskin: WINFIELD SCOTT AND THE PROFESSION OF ARMS, 2003, p. 221; Lowe: FIVE YEARS A DRAGOON ('49 TO '54)... 1965, p.xix.]

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[Lincoln, Abraham] Daggett, E.A.:
THE WIDE-AWAKE VOCALIST; OR, RAIL SPLITTERS' SONG BOOK. WORDS AND MUSIC FOR THE REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN OF 1860. EMBRACING A GREAT VARIETY OF SONGS, SOLOS, DUETS, AND CHORUSES. ARRANGED FOR PIANO OR MELODEON. THE BEST COLLECTION OF WORDS AND MUSIC EVER PUBLISHED FOR A CAMPAIGN. EVERY CLUB AND FAMILY SHOULD HAVE COPIES, SO AS TO JOIN IN THE CHORUSES. THE LADIES ARE INVITED TO JOIN IN THE CHORUSES AT THE MEETINGS.
Published by E. A. Daggett. 333 Broadway, New York:, [1860]
Original printed wrappers [moderately foxed, light extremity wear] with wrapper title, as issued. 64pp, oblong. Stitched. Text lightly foxed, corners rounded. Else Very Good. The "Wide Awakes," Lincoln supporters, were known for their torchlight marches, wearing black capes and soldiers' hats. Because rail-splitting had been one of the young Lincoln's occupations, it became a popular symbol of his humble origins. This content-rich political songster was sold for a dime each to Wide-Awakes and other Republican supporters. The Index on the front wrapper's verso lists 62 songs to rally anti-slavery men for Lincoln's first presidential campaign. Most songs are scored for four voices; a few are solos; and music is included for many. Extra verse are provided in nearly all cases. Titles include "Get out de Way, You Little Giant," "High Old Abe Shall Win," "O Poor Douglas" (sung to the tune of "O Susanna"); "Was ist des Deutschen Vaterland" [for the necessary support of German-American voters]. "The March of the Free" is attributed to Horace Greeley, "Seventy-Six" to William Cullen Bryant, and "Up for the Conflict" to John Greenleaf Whittier. Also, "Honest Abe of the West," "Lincoln and Hamlin the True," "We are coming to this Presidential War," "The Candidate With a Cork Leg," "The People Had Five Candidates," "Shout for the Prairie King," "Roll On the Republican Ball," "The Baltimore Convention," "Republicans: the Nation Calls You!," "We Will Vote for Old Abe Lincoln." Monaghan 91. Nicolay Bibliography 1050.

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Alien & Sedition Act:
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO WHOM WERE REFERRED, ON THE 12TH INSTANT, CERTAIN MEMORIALS & PETITIONS COMPLAINING OF THE ACT, INTITULED "AN ACT CONCERNING ALIENS," AND OF OTHER LATE ACTS OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES. 21ST FEBRUARY, 1799. COMMITTED TO A COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE HOUSE, ON MONDAY NEXT. [PUBLISHED BY THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES].
15, [1 blank] pp. Untrimmed, stitched, light soil and fox. Good+. Sabin attributes authorship to Chauncey Goodrich, stalwart Connecticut Federalist and brother-in-law of Oliver Wolcott. This House Report rejects criticism of the Alien & Sedition Act, despite claims of its unconstitutional limitation on free speech and the absence of Congressional power to remove aliens. The Report illustrates the rather cramped interpretation of the First Amendment by some early American statesmen. The Committee concludes that the First Amendment guarantees only the right to publish without prior governmental restraint. Freedom of the press "consists in permission to publish, without previous restraint upon the press, but subject to punishment afterwards for improper publication." Moreover, liberty of the press has never prohibited government from inflicting "punishment on wicked and malicious publications." FIRST EDITION. Evans 36581. Sabin 69843. Not in Cohen.

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Cunard Line:
CUNARD LINE ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS. NEW YORK & BOSTON TO LIVERPOOL. TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS "CUNARD". SAILINGS ON SATURDAYS & TUESDAYS. CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN. ALSO REGULAR SAILINGS FROM LIVERPOOL TO HAVRE, ITALY THE ADRIATIC AND LEVANT.
Multi-colored broadside, matted and framed. Illustrated with the American and British flags; a uniformed, white-bearded Captain in the foreground, surrounded by a life preserver. A section for rectangular label listing the name and address of the Agent is missing. Light toning, Good+. The broadside lists the Line's offices: New York, Boston, Chicago, Liverpool, Glasgow, London, Glasgow, Manchester, Queenstown, Paris, Havre.

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Douglas, Stephen A.:
AUTOGRAPH LETTER, SIGNED, DATED WASHINGTON, JULY 8TH, 1852, TO JOHN WOODS, A FORMER OHIO CONGRESSMAN AND NOW PRESIDENT OF THE CINCINNATI, HAMILTON, AND INDIANAPOLIS RAILROAD, RESPONDING TO WOODS'S PROPOSED RAILROAD LINKING CHICAGO AND CINCINNATI. "ACCEPT MY THANKS FOR THE REPORT OF THE NEW CASTLE & RICHMOND RAIL ROAD, WITH THE ACCOMPANYING MAP OF THE RAIL ROADS NORTH WEST OF THE OHIO RIVER. I TAKE GREAT INTEREST IN YOUR ROAD AS A LINK IN THE CHAIN WHICH IS TO CONNECT CINCINNATI WITH CHICAGO. THAT THE WHOLE CHAIN WILL SOON BE COMPLETED I CANNOT DOUBT, AND THAT IT WILL [--] ADMIRABLY WHEN COMPLETED CANNOT BE DOUBTED BY ANY ONE FAMILIAR WITH THE COUNTRY THROUGH WHICH IT PASSES. I TAKE THAT CONGRESS WILL NOT HESITATE TO GIVE YOU A GRANT OF LAND IN AID OF THIS WORK EQUAL TO THE ONE MADE TO ILLINOIS FOR THE CHICAGO AND MOBILE ROAD. BUT THE ROAD MUST BE MADE AND THE STOCK WILL BE A GOOD INVESTMENT, WHETHER THE GRANT OF LAND IS MADE OR NOT. CINCINNATI & CHICAGO ARE DESTINED TO BE THE GREAT CITIES OF THE NORTH WEST AND MUST BE CONNECTED BY RAIL RAIL [sic] ROAD. I WOULD NOT DESIRE ANY BETTER INVESTMENT THAN THE STOCK OF THIS ROAD, AND I DO NOT HESITATE TO ASSURE YOU THAT WHATEVER I CAN DO TO PROMOTE ITS SUCCESS EITHER IN CONGRESS OR ELSEWHERE WILL BE CHEERFULLY DONE. "I HAVE THE HONOR TO BE VERY TRULY YOUR OBEDIENT SERVANT, S.A.DOUGLAS"
Folio sheet, folded to 7-3/4" x 9-3/4". Manuscript text on first 1-1/2 pages, docketed on last page. Old horizontal folds, Very Good. [offered with] RETAINED COPY OF LETTER FROM WOODS TO DOUGLAS, ALSO DATED WASHINGTON JULY 8, 1852: "WE TAKE THE LIBERTY TO CALL YOUR ATTENTION TO THE RAIL ROAD WHICH IS IN PROCESS OF CONSTRUCTION UPON THE MOST DIRECT LINE FROM CINCINNATI TO CHICAGO. FIFTY TWO MILES OF THIS ROAD ARE COMPLETED AND IN OPERATION, AND TWENTY EIGHT MILES MORE WILL BE FINISHED BEFORE THE FIRST OF DECEMBER NEXT, MAKING THE WHOLE DISTANCE FROM CINCINNATI WHICH WILL BE FINISHED ABOUT 80 MILES. THE BALANCE OF THE ROAD TO LOGANSPORT IS UNDER CONTRACT AND WILL BE COMPLETED IN 1853. THE WAY FROM LOGANSPORT TO THE WEST LINE OF INDIANA BEING ABOUT 100 MILES IS NOT YET UNDER CONTRACT, BUT A COMPANY IS ORGANIZED AND A PART OF THE STOCK SUBSCRIBED AND IT IS THE INTENTION OF THE COMPANY TO COMMENCE THE WORK AT AN EARLY DAY. "IF FURTHER APPROPRIATIONS OF MONEY SHALL BE MADE TO AID ANY OF OUR WESTERN RAIL ROADS WE DEEM THIS ROAD EMINENTLY ENTITLED TO AID AS THE CONNECTING ROUTE BETWEEN THE TWO GREAT MANUFACTURING AND COMMERCIAL CITIES OF THE WEST. "AS YOU ARE WELL ACQUAINTED WITH THE CHARACTER OF THE COUNTRY THROUGH WHICH THIS ROAD PASSES AND WITH THE INTERESTS AND PROSPECTS OF THE CITIES WHICH IT WILL UNITE WE TRUST THAT IT WILL RECEIVE YOUR EFFICIENT AID. "VERY RESPECTFULLY, YOUR OBT. SERVT." Folio sheet folded to 7-3/4" x 9-3/4", on blue paper. Manuscript text on first 1-1/2 pages, docketed on last page. Old horizontal folds, Very Good. United States Senator from Illinois, Douglas was ideologically, emotionally, and financially committed to the development of Chicago as the commercial center of an American empire extending to the west coast. All other political questions-- including that of Slavery-- were subordinated. Chairman of the Committee on Territories, he sought a railroad route to the Pacific, with Chicago as the hub: railroads to and from Chicago would create that Illinois outpost as the most important City in the Nation. "Personally, he had invested heavily in real estate at Chicago and at Superior City, Michigan" [Potter, The Impending Crisis, page 152. Harper & Row: 1976]. Woods, former Democratic Congressman and a railroad man, was obviously well-acquainted with Douglas and his priorities. This exchange of letters, written on the same day, expresses Douglas's overriding attachment to public investment in railroad construction, particularly through Chicago. It would lead him, in an effort to develop a transcontinental railroad, to sponsor the fateful Kansas-Nebraska Act, whose passage would repeal the 1820 Missouri Compromise, which had kept an uneasy peace between the Sections for thirty years.

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United States, Third Congress:
JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEING THE SECOND SESSION OF THE THIRD CONGRESS, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, NOVEMBER 3, 1794.
John Fenno, Philadelphia:, 1794
Folio. 114, [12] pp. Original marbled boards, rebacked and recornered. New endpapers. Scattered mild foxing. Very Good. The challenge of this Session was the Whisky Rebellion. President Washington's Message opening the Session recounts the attacks upon federal officers, including the kidnapping of a federal marshal. Concluding that the normal judicial process was inadequate to the task of suppressing the rebellion, the President called out the militia. His careful, measured response is delineated here. The Session devotes much attention to matters affecting the militia. Issues involving Creek Indian lands within the State of Georgia are also considered. Evans 29724.

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Fremont, John Charles:
REPORT OF THE EXPLORING EXPEDITION TO THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS IN THE YEAR 1842, AND TO OREGON AND NORTH CALIFORNIA IN THE YEARS 1843-'44. BY BREVET CAPTAIN J.C. FREMONT, OF THE TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS, UNDER THE ORDERS OF COL. J.J. ABERT, CHIEF OF THE TOPOGRAPHICAL BUREAU. PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
Blair and Rives, Printers, Washington:, 1845
28th Cong., 2d Sess. HD166. 583, [1 blank] pp, plus 22 plates and five maps, as issued. Original publisher's cloth [minor wear, front joint starting], a few short separations at folds of large map. Else Very Good. "The most spectacular reconnaissance of the West since Lewis and Clark and the catalyst which changed the entire picture of Western geography and set a generation of pioneers and gold-seekers on the trek westward" [Jenkins]. The "magnificent" folding map and report "changed the entire picture of the West and made a lasting contribution to cartography" [Wheat, pp 194-195]. This is the House report, issued in the same year as the Senate report, and possibly preceding it. "Contains his first and second expeditions" [Howes]. Wagner-Camp 115.2. Howes F370. Streeter Sale 3131. Jenkins Full Howes 924. Wheat Transmississippi West 497. Field 565.

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[Maine]:
TO THE PATRIOTIC CITIZEN SOLDIERY OF MAINE:..
Broadside, 24" x 8-3/4". Old horizontal folds, minor wear. Docketed in ink on verso. Very Good. The Address is preceded at the top by five Messages and General Orders from the Governor and the Adjutant General, dated July 4, 5, 7 [two orders], and 8, 1862, with the seal of the State of Maine on each. They urge enlistment in the Union cause to meet "the exigency of the public service." The Address recites relevant portions of Maine's Militia Laws, rendering men "liable to military duty," and warns, "You must be drafted or detached, if you will not enlist." As an enticement to enlist, a cash bounty will be paid, "no part of which can be received by detached or drafted men." Difficulties in securing troops at the Nation's hour of maximum need are suggested by Governor Washburn's July 7 Message: "large numbers of soldiers are absent from their Regiments, some on furlough and some on sick leave, who are now able to return to the Regiments where they are needed for the service of their country." Not located on OCLC as of April 2017, or at the online sites of AAS, Harvard, or the University of Maine.

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[Fisher, William Logan]:
AN EXAMINATION OF THE NEW SYSTEM OF SOCIETY, BY ROBERT OWEN, SHOWING ITS INSUFFICIENCY TO REFORM MANKIND. WITH OBSERVATIONS ON THE OPERATION OF THE PRINCIPLE OF VIRTUE IN THE MIND OF MAN.
Published by John Mortimer... Jesper Harding, Printer, Philadelphia:, 1826
x, [11]-86 pp. Several light institutional rubberstamps, lightly worn. Bound in attractive, modern marbled boards and quarter calf, gilt-lettered red morocco spine label. Good+. Fisher [1781-1862] was a Philadelphia Quaker, philosopher, and entrepreneur: he owned one of the area's first woolen mills, and operated the Duncannon Iron Works. An avid reformer, he opposed establishment of the Sabbath in Pennsylvania's laws. "Fisher's aversion to coercion extended beyond the religious sphere as well, and in 1826 he wrote a respectful but forceful critique of Robert Owen's new system of social reform [this offering]. Doubting Owen's Lockean assumption that mankind has no moral virtue other than what was inculcated through education, Fisher also regarded the 're-modification of self-interest' at the heart of Owenism to be far too sanguine about the perfectibility of man. Pointing out significant instances of general moral virtue among the Native Americans and black slaves, who had no rationalized system of moral influence at their disposal, Fisher maintained the Quaker view that moral rectitude is available to all through consultation with their divine individual conscience. This view aligned him with the more liberal views of the Quaker Elias Hicks" [Dictionary of Early American Philosophers]. AI 24538. Not in Sabin, Eberstadt, Larned.

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Lee, Henry:
A FUNERAL ORATION, ON THE DEATH OF GENERAL WASHINGTON. DELIVERED IN PHILADELPHIA, AT THE REQUEST OF CONGRESS. BY MAJOR GENERAL HENRY LEE, MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM VIRGINIA. ORNAMENTED WITH AN ELEGANT ENGRAVING.
Printed by John Hoff, Cherry-Street; and Sold by the Principal Booksellers in this and the Neighbouring States, Philadelphia:, 1800
4to, in original plain drab wrappers. Paper title pasted to front wrapper. Side-stitched, 20pp. Engraving frontis, with original tissue guard, by Trenchard & Weston: "Sacred to the Memory of General George Washington..." Lee's famous words are affixed to the base of the Monument: "First in War, first in Peace, & first in the hearts of his Countrymen." Front blank free endpaper torn away, scattered foxing to the early leaves and wrappers, bit of blank edge wear. Good+. "Following Washington's death on December 14, 1799, the Sixth Congress commissioned Lee, his brother in arms, to write a moving eulogy. Congress was unanimous in choosing Lee for the task, believing he was best suited to express 'those sentiments of respect for the character, of the gratitude for the service, and of grief for the death of that illustrious personage'." [online Digital Encyclopedia of George Washington, mountvernon.org]. Church 1290 [this edition]. Stillwell 133. Evans 37806.

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[Chandler, Thomas Bradbury]:
THE AMERICAN QUERIST: OR, SOME QUESTIONS PROPOSED RELATIVE TO THE PRESENT DISPUTES BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN, AND HER AMERICAN COLONIES. BY A NORTH-AMERICAN. WE ARE NOT TO THINK EVERY CLAMOROUS HARANGUER, OR EVERY SPLENETIC REPINER AGAINST A COURT, IS THEREFORE A PATRIOT. BISHOP BERKLEY.
Printed by James Rivington, New-York:, 1774
[2], 31, [1 blank] pp. Lacking the half title, else Very Good in modern cloth with printed paper spine label, James Copley bookplate on the front pastedown. Chandler's anonymously written pamphlet kindled the anger of American Patriots. At the base of the title page Rivington has printed: "This pamphlet, on the eighth day of September last, was, in full conclave of the Sons of Liberty in New-York, committed to the flames by the hands of their common executioner; as it contains some queries they cannot, and others they will not answer!" The pamphlet is styled "Tenth Edition" on the title page; but, according to Adams, it is the second edition, as well as the first to identify Rivington as the printer, and the first to print the interesting note at the base of the title page. Chandler, Connecticut-born Episcopal priest and Yale graduate, was devoted to the interests of the Church of England in the American Colonies. Proof that politics follows religion, he bitterly attacked the Continental Congress and America's growing revolutionary inclinations in the 'American Querist.' He would cast his lot with England, emigrating in May 1775. "Although he had advised the repeal of the Stamp Act, he was as ardent a Loyalist as churchman, and the events of the next few years moved him to vigorous protest against the drift toward revolution... The occurrences of April 1775 were too much for his Loyalist fervor, and he departed for England the following month" [DAB]. What Chandler "and other articulate defenders of the status quo saw as the final threat was not so much the replacement of one set of rulers by another as the triumph of ideas and attitudes incompatible with the stability of any standing order, any establishment" [Bailyn, Ideological Origins of the American Revolution 318]. The pamphlet takes the form of one hundred rhetorical questions, reflecting Chandler's positions on the split with England, the North American Charters granted by the Crown, the Stamp Act, and the unrest in the American Colonies: "Whether the disorder of the colonies, to speak in language taken from animal bodies, be not of the feverish kind, as it is attended with an irregular high pulse, and discovers, in some parts, a dangerous swelling and inflammation; and whether it has not been occasioned, in a great measure, by their own imprudence and intemperance?" [No. 10]. Some later Queries refer to specific occurrences: "Whether the several colonies, by having chosen delegates to represent them at the congress, have not taken the matter in dispute out of the hands of the people; and whether those, who, notwithstanding, still endeavour farther to inflame the passions of the populace, already intoxicated with a few magical sounds, are not to be considered and treated as incendiaries, scattering abroad the firebrands of faction, in order to bring on the conflagration of their country?" [No. 89]. Howes C753. Adams, American Independence 106b. Evans 13221.

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Platten, J[ohn] R[ussell]:
WORLD WAR I MANUSCRIPT DIARY KEPT BY BRITISH NAVAL OFFICER J.R. PATTEN, COLLINGWOOD BATTALION, AT THE SIEGE OF ANTWERP, OCTOBER 4, 1914 THROUGH OCTOBER 8, 1914.
4to.16 leaves, ruled, pencil manuscript in legible cursive hand on rectos only. Bound in blue paper wrappers with marbled spine [light wear], paper label affixed to front cover. On each of the last three leaves, a bottom tear costs 4-8 lines of text. Good+. This is a first hand-account of the Siege of Antwerp written by John Russell Platten of the Collingwood Battalion. The Battalion was named after Lord Cuthbert Collingwood, Vice Admiral, and composed primarily of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. The Diary's abrupt change of tone, from pre-combat innocence to the horrors of war, is striking. The Battalion left Dover on Sunday, October 4, 1914, and landed at Dunkirk. They were sent to relieve the Belgians at Whybreck. On October 5th the Collingwood men occupied trenches beyond Antwerp. Bombarded for three days, they remained under fire through the night of October 8, with part of Antwerp ablaze. On October 9 the remaining garrison surrendered. Of the 700 seamen, only 22 reportedly got back to England; the rest were killed, or captured and interned in Holland or Germany. The October 4 entry describes the soldiers' jubilation upon learning that they would be "leaving for the continent." They marched to Dover, Patten's father and brother accompanying him until they reached the pier and said their goodbyes. On their way to Dunkirk the next day, they attacked their tins of "bully beef" with their bayonets and met a French torpedo boat, tossing halfpennies to the French soldiers as mementos and laughing as the soldiers scrambled after them. The excitement lasted into the next day as they were "pressed mug after mug of lager to drink as they wished;" ladies brought them aprons filled with cigarettes. After more cheer the Collingwood Battalion was assigned "the first blood" and headed to the trenches. Here the tone of the diary quickly changes. The morning of October 7th an "aeroplane sailed over"; a "German Taube machine," it dropped four bombs on them. They built "bomb proof shelters," raiding a nearby home for supplies. Platten describes the fallen faces of the farmer and his wife as they watched the men tear down doors, smash wardrobes, and knock the bottoms out of drawers. The men returned to the trenches and hunkered down while projectiles shrieked overhead. They expected an attack around dawn; Platten calls it the longest night he had ever experienced. On the morning of the 8th, news reached them that the Colonel had been killed, that they needed to hold the trenches "at all costs" until the following night, and that General Lawlinson would then try to relieve them. "We number something under eight thousand, they on the safe side of a hundred thousand... Major Cooreman is done & his mind seems to be giving way." The men attempted to retreat, but were ordered back. "The whole of Antwerp seems to be in flames... The trenches are falling in now owing to the shells and several men have been buried alive." A further entry: "My mind is almost a blank & I walk as if in a dream... Another man has gone mad and I don't think any of us can go much further." The British Naval Archives lists John Russell Platten with Service Number 4/2670, a member of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve at London; date of birth December 12, 1892; ranks of Ordinary Seaman, Able Seaman (undated), and Acting Leading Seaman Royal Naval Division. He joined the 4th Battalion a/k/a Collingwood Battalion at the outbreak of war, about August 2, 1914. He was later reported as being interned in Holland on October 8, 1914.

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[Philadelphia] [Mount Vernon Runaway Slave]:
PHILADELPHIA GAZETTE & DAILY ADVERTISER. WEDNESDAY, 20TH AUGUST, 1800. "WHATEVER MEASURES HAVE A TENDENCY TO DISSOLVE THE UNION, OR CONTRIBUTE TO VIOLATE OR LESSEN THE SOVEREIGN AUTHORITY, OUGHT TO BE CONSIDERED AS HOSTILE TO THE LIBERTIES AND INDEPENDENCE OF AMERICA." [GEO. WASHINGTON.].
Brown & Relf, Philadelphia:, 1800
Folio, [4] pp folded to 13-1/2" x 18-3/8". Each page printed in five columns. Several short repairs, some blank edge and margin chipping. Good+. Several items of interest: Stephen Girard's advertisement offering for sale "Cogniac and Bordeaux Brandy," "Russia Soap and Candle Tallow," "A few Tons of best clean St. Petersburg HEMP," and other items; a "Letter from a Physician in New-York to his Correspondent in Philadelphia, Relative to the Yellow Fever;" activities of the frigates Constellation and Constitution. "MARCUS, One of the House Servants at Mount Vernon, Absconded on the second instant, and since has not been heard of. He is a young lad, about 16 years of age, a bright mulatto... I will give Ten Dollars Reward to any person who shall apprehend the said negro and lodge him in some safe gaol..." Signed by James Anderson of Mount Vernon, in type.

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[House of Representatives]:
DEBATES IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES, DURING THE FIRST SESSION OF THE FOURTH CONGRESS, PART I. UPON THE CONSTITUTIONAL POWERS OF THE HOUSE, WITH RESPECT TO TREATIES.
Printed for Benj. Franklin Bache, by Bioren & Madan, Philadelphia:, 1796
386pp. Original calf, with the front cover detached but present. Else Very Good. The first of two parts, recorded separately by Evans [see, also, Evans 31352] but together by NAIP, which collates a general title page preceding the first part. This first part treats the power, if any, of the House to weigh in with its views on the propriety of treaties negotiated by the President. Evans 31351.

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[Indiana Elections- 1840]:
FOR GOVERNOR, SAMUEL BIGGER. LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, SAMUEL HALL...
3-1/2" x 5-1/4", ticket printed on yellow paper, with illustration of William Henry Harrison's iconic Log Cabin, Hard Cider Barrel. Irregular margins, light wear, small pinhole [no text loss], else Very Good. Bigger, an Indiana circuit court judge, would become that State's seventh Governor as a Whig. The underticket included Thomas N. Thomas for Coroner, Isaac Pugh for County Commissioner, John B. Ferguson for Sheriff, Israel Harding and Philip Sweetser for Representatives, and Robert Hanna for Senator. The underticket candidates are from Marion County, whose county seat is Indianapolis.

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[Indiana Elections- 1840]:
HARRISON TICKET. FOR GOVERNOR, SAMUEL BIGGER. LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, SAMUEL HALL...
3-3/8" x 4-1/2", ticket printed on yellow paper, with illustration of the 'Screaming Eagle' at the top. Irregular left margin, light wear, else Very Good. Bigger, an Indiana circuit court judge, would become that State's seventh Governor as a Whig. The underticket included Thomas N. Thomas for Coroner, Isaac Pugh for County Commissioner, John B. Ferguson for Sheriff, Israel Harding and Philip Sweetser for Representatives, and Robert Hanna for Senator. The underticket candidates are from Marion County, whose county seat is Indianapolis.

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Georgia Baptist Association:
MINUTES OF THE TWENTY-FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF THE GEORGIA BAPTIST CONVENTION, HELD AT LA GRANGE, TROUP COUNTY, GA., MAY 13TH, 14TH, 16TH, AND 18TH, 1842.
Printed by Benj. Brantley, Penfield, Ga.:, 1842
Stitched. 24. Some spotting and foxing. Good+. This is one of the earliest Penfield imprints; printing appears to have begun there about 1840. The participants in the Convention and their doings are noted. Committee Reports and financial data are printed. Not in De Renne.

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Helper, Hinton R.:
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, 4 MARCH 1865, FROM THE UNITED STATES CONSULATE AT BUENOS AIRES, TO EDWARD M. DAVIS OF PHILADELPHIA, DELIGHTING IN THE UNION'S IMPENDING VICTORY IN THE CIVIL WAR, HOPING FOR A RESTORED UNION AND THE "IRREPARABLE DOWNFALL OF SLAVERY AND THE SLAVEHOLDERS."
[4]pp, entirely in ink manuscript. Light wear, Very Good. Helper, the prominent North Carolina abolitionist whose 'Impending Crisis of the South' argued that Slavery was destroying southern society, was Lincoln's Consul to Argentina. After the War he became an extreme Negrophobe, urging the deportation of the freed slaves. Like Andrew Johnson and not a few southern Unionists, his opposition to slavery was based, not on compassion for the slaves, but on resentment of their masters, the elite planter class. Here he writes to his friend Davis, a staunch anti-slavery man who had served on General Fremont's staff in Missouri during the War. "How do you feel after four years of war with the Slaveholders? Four years do I say? For you, I ought, perhaps, to say twenty, or even more; for, if I mistake not, you have always, since your very first years of discretion, practiced the virtue of antagonism to the fiendish fraternity of Kidnappers and Slaveholders. But I have more particular reference to the four years of actual, hard, material war, which, in defence of our own integrity, we have been constrained to wage with energy against the accursed enemies of the human race... [O]f the future, we are of course, more or less like yourself, left to conjecture. What think you of the prospect?" Helper says that there is "but one solution to the problem, and that is the complete reestablishment of the Union over the irreparable downfall of Slavery and the Slaveholders. May the God of all grace keep our eyes from beholding any other solution than this!"

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[Western Reserve] [Connecticut]:
WHEREAS THE DIRECTORS OF THE COMPANY INCORPORATED BY THE STATE OF OHIO, BY THE NAME OF THE PROPRIETORS OF "THE HALF MILLION ACRES OF LAND, LYING SOUTH OF LAKE ERIE, CALLED SUFFERERS LAND," ASSESSED A TAX OF TWENTY-FIVE CENTS ON THE POUND, OF THE ORIGINAL LOSSES TO BE PAID BY EACH PROPRIETOR, IN PROPORTION TO EACH PERSON'S RESPECTIVE SHARE OR LOSS AS SET IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT - AND WHEREAS THE PROPRIETOR OF THE RIGHT OR LOSS SET IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT TO AND IN THE NAME OF NEHEMIAH PHIPPENY HAS NEGLECTED TO PAY SAID TAX BY THE TIME DIRECTED BY THE VOTE OF SAID DIRECTORS - SO MUCH OF SAID LOSS AS WOULD RAISE THE SUM OF THREE DOLLARS AND FIFTEEN CENTS BEING THE AMOUNT OF SAID TAX DUE ON SAID LOSS, AND THIRTY ONE CENTS BEING THE REASONABLE CHARGES ON SAID SALE [EXCLUSIVE OF THE COST OF THIS DEED] TO LOTHROP LEWIS OF SO FAIRFIELD HE BEING THE HIGHEST BIDDER.
Broadsheet, 12 1/2" x 15 1/2". Printed document completed in ink manuscript. Old folds with some repaired splits and one 6" unrepaired split. Some small chips along a few splits with minimal loss. Light tanning, scattered spotting. Good+. The original grant for this land was to Nehemiah Phippeny, who lost title for nonpayment of taxes. The land was sold to Lothrop Lewis of Fairfield, Connecticut, on May 27, 1805. On the verso are hand written transfers of the same piece of property: from Lothrop Lewis to William Hawley of Woodbury, January 21, 1806; from Hawley to Nehemiah Dibble of Stamford, February 7, 1806; from Dibble to Zalmon & Seymour Wildman of Danbury, October 20, 1806. There is also a voided transaction [crossed out] from Hawley to William Lamson of Waterbury, January 31, 1806. In 1800, the State of Connecticut granted to her citizens who were sufferers by fire, caused by the British during the Revolutionary War, a half million acres of land, lying within the State of Ohio, which was to be taken off the west part of the "Western Connecticut Reserve," now embraced in the counties of Huron and Erie. By an 1803 Act of Ohio, the sufferers were incorporated as "The proprietors of the half million acres of land, lying south of Lake Erie, called 'Sufferers' Land'." The Act required management of the Company by a Board of Directors. The Board was to locate and survey the granted land, and to partition it among the different claimants. This part of the Western Reserve was inhabited by Indians, who engaged in warfare with the settlers. On July 4, 1805, a treaty between the United States and the Wyandot, Ottawa, Chippewa, Munsee and Delaware, Shawanee and Pattawatamy nations was signed whereby those Indian nations, in consideration of, released their claims to all the lands owned by the company.

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[Davis, Jefferson]:
WHAT JEFF. DAVIS THINKS OF THE WAR.
National Union Executive Committee, [New York:, 1864]
Broadside, 9" x 11 1/2", printed in two columns. Old folds, a bit of foxing, Very Good. A rare broadside, demonstrating Jefferson Davis's affinity with the Democratic Party, expressed at its Chicago convention. "The main plank of the Chicago Platform is that which pronounces the war a FAILURE, and on that account demands that 'IMMEDIATE EFFORTS BE MADE FOR A CESSATION OF HOSTILITIES'." Eberstadt calls this a "scarce piece denouncing the Chicago plank, and airing Davis' views as expressed at Macon, Montgomery, and Richmond. The effectual way to end the war and restore the Union is: VOTE FOR LINCOLN." FIRST EDITION. 133 Eberstadt 281. OCLC locates seven copies under several accession numbers as of April 2017.

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[Civil War]:
ARMS OF YE CONFEDERACIE.
G. H. Heap Inv., [Philadelphia?]:, [1862?]
Engraving on off-white card, 4-3/4" x 4". "G.H. Heap Inv. H.H. Tilley Del. et Sc." Very Good. "A small card bearing a vitriolic indictment of the Confederacy. The artist particularly attacks the institution of slavery... A large shield is flanked by two figures: a planter (left) and a slave. The planter wears spurs and a broad-brimmed hat and smokes a cigar. The slave is clad only in breeches, and his hands are manacled. Above the shield are two crossed flags, the Confederate flag and one bearing a skull and crossbones and the number 290. Between the flags are a rooster and a streamer with the motto 'servitudo esto perpetua.' On the shield are images associated with the South: a mint julep, a bottle of 'Old Rye,' a pistol and dagger, a whip and manacles, cotton, tobacco, and sugar plants, and slaves hoeing. In the background left, dominated by the palmetto tree of South Carolina, three planters, one holding a whip, play cards at a table. Beyond, two men duel with pistols. On the right, a female slave is auctioned as two slave children stand by. A black woman watches from a cabin doorway" [Reilly]. Reilly 1862-13. OCLC records five locations under three accession numbers [Penn. State, U So. Car., Lib. Cong., MA Hist., W Res. Hist. Soc.] as of April 2017.

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Drew, Charles:
THE ROLE OF SOVIET INVESTIGATORS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BLOOD BANK. [IN] AMERICAN REVIEW OF SOVIET MEDICINE, APRIL 1944.
Published by the American-Soviet Medical Society, New York:, 1944
Drew's article occupies pages 360-369 of the April 1944 issue. We offer the entire Volume I, consisting of four issues totaling 588 pages. Portraits, illustrations, charts, bound in original large 8vo red cloth, gilt spine title lettering. Very Good. This is the article's first appearance by the father of the American and British blood banks of World War II. Drew became the first African-American to receive a Doctor of Science degree, which he earned for his thesis, written at Columbia, on blood banks. Drew's article acknowledges the early Soviet work in the preservation of blood.

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Belisario, A.M.:
A REPORT OF THE TRIAL OF ARTHUR HODGE, ESQUIRE, (LATE ONE OF THE MEMBERS OF HIS MAJESTY'S COUNCIL FOR THE VIRGIN-ISLANDS) AT THE ISLAND OF TORTOLA, ON THE 25TH APRIL, 1811, AND ADJOURNED TO THE 29TH OF THE SAME MONTH; FOR THE MURDER OF HIS NEGRO MAN SLAVE NAMED PROSPER. STENOGRAPHICALLY TAKEN BY A.M. BELISARIO, ESQUIRE, ONE OF THE GRAND JURY WHO FOUND THE BILL OF INDICTMENT; AND CERTIFIED TO BE IMPARTIAL AND CORRECT BY HIS HONOR RICHARD HETHERINGTON, ESQ. PRESIDENT OF THE VIRGIN-ISLANDS, AND PRESIDENT OF THE COURT ON THIS TRIAL.
Tertius Dunning, Middletown [CT]:, 1812
Contemporary paper-covered boards [rebacked in period style]. [2], 186 pp. Untrimmed, occasional toning and mild foxing. Very Good. A rare printing of a judicial rarity: the trial of a master for murdering his slave. American Imprints, locating only one copy [Fisk University], suggests incorrectly that Middletown Tennessee, was the printing site. Hodge's brutality was too much even for the slave province of Tortola: the jury sentenced him to hang because Hodge, after having flogged Prosper for two days, left him to die a painful death-- without food or medical aid-- over the next week and a half. This case was extraordinary for several reasons, not least that "the chief prosecution witness was a free black woman. In the slave states (and some of the free states) it was illegal for a black to testify against a white" [Finkelman 291]. The evidence demonstrated Hodge's notoriously cruel treatment of his slaves. For Hodge's lawyers to assert "that a negro, being property, it was no greater offence in law for his owner to kill him, than it would be to kill his dog" [page 77], was surely a major tactical error. Hodge was hanged; the case apparently contributed to the abolition of slavery in the British West Indies. FIRST EDITION. Finkelman 290. II Harv. Law Cat. 1103. AI 24790 [1]. OCLC locates seven copies as of April 2017 under several accession numbers. LCP Supp. 1080. Cohen 12700.

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Riddle, A[lbert] G[allatin]:
CLOSING ARGUMENT OF THE HON. A.G. RIDDLE, FOR THE PROSECUTION, AT THE TRIAL OF HIRAM C. WHITLEY, RICHARD HARRINGTON, AND ARTHUR B. WILLIAMS, FOR CONSPIRACY, IN THE CRIMINAL COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, NOVEMBER 23, 24, AND 25, 1874.
Government Printing Office, Washington:, 1874
Original printed wrappers, 214pp. Wraps chipped at the extremities. Very Good. Riddle represented the United States in a complicated, bizarre case involving the theft of documents from a vault in the office of the Washington, D.C. District Attorney. Those indicted included the Chief, Assistant Chief, and a clerk of the U.S. Secret Service; an assistant U.S. attorney; and a prominent Washington criminal lawyer. The purpose of the theft was to obtain documents for use in an investigation. The case received great attention for "the revelations of the inside history of the District government, for its novelty, and from the curious tissue of circumstantial evidence developed at the trial..." 9 American Law Review 351 [1875]. FIRST EDITION. II Harv. Law Cat. 468.

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[Sovereigns of Industry]:
SOMERVILLE, MAY 10TH, 1875. TO THE BROTHERS AND SISTERS, UNION COUNCIL NO. 71, SOVEREIGNS OF INDUSTRY
Broadside, 5" x 10". A few old folds. Signed in type by A.T. Small, Jas. E. Crawford, Able Jones, Sarah J. Price, and J. Campbell, as the Committee on Charges. Official Council blindstamp at the bottom right corner. Very Good. The Sovereigns of Industry, established in 1874, grew out of the Patrons of Husbandry, a mutual aid society for farmers. The Sovereigns sought members among all workingmen, not just farmers. Its purpose, articulated by its founder, William H. Earle of Massachusetts, was "elevating the character, improving the condition of, and, as far as possible, perfecting the happiness of the laboring classes" through the establishment of consumer cooperatives. The cooperative network would allow workers to "control the whole of what they produce, and exchange it as near as may be even with other hand-workers, thus saving to themselves the fortunes which those who are devoted to manipulating other people's labour and to getting rich thereby, have heretofore taken by extortion." [Commons, John R., et al.: HISTORY OF LABOUR IN THE UNITED STATES: NATIONALISATION [1860-1877], VOLUME II, New York: 1921, Pages 172-173.] A scandal occurred in Union Council No. 71, Somerville, Massachusetts. A conspiracy to usurp the authority of the Council majority, on the location of a new Hall, was charged. The conspirators allegedly were guilty of self-dealing by choosing a Hall for their own personal gain. "Riotous disorderly and disgraceful proceedings" erupted. Not located on OCLC as of May 2017.

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[Slavery]:
THE GREAT ISSUE NOW BEFORE THE PEOPLE, WITH REMARKS UPON ITS MERITS, AND CLAIMS UPON THE SERIOUS CONSIDERATION OF THE WELL-WISHERS OF OUR COUNTRY.
24pp, disbound, three small binding holes in blank left margin. Two early signatures of Wm. Thompson Shafer on title page. Light spotting throughout. About Good+. This scarce pamphlet says the "great issue" is whether "Slavery shall be allowed to overspread a territory of greater extent than that of the whole United States," and "whether the policy of our government is to continue to be that of Slavery Extension, or Slavery Restriction." All the power of the presidency is "being used to force the withering and blighting scourge of Slavery upon the National domain." Pursuing this tyrannical course, our government "shall lend its aid in striking a deathblow to the freedom of speech, the liberty of the press, and the security for life, personal liberty, possession, and peace." LCP 4300. OCLC 22829199 [4- LCP, No. IL U, Haverford, Detroit Pub. Lib.] as of April 2017.

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