TO THE VOTERS OF THE FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT OF MISSISSIPPI. William A. Lake.

TO THE VOTERS OF THE FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT OF MISSISSIPPI.

[Vicksburg: 1861]. Broadside, 7 3/4 x 14 1/4". Light old folds. Printed in two columns, signed in type at the end by Lake and dated Vicksburg, August 13, 1861. Signed, 'Hon. W.A. Lake' in ink at the top blank margin. Very Good.

Lake started out in the Border State of Maryland, graduated from Pennsylvania's Jefferson College, and then set up his law practice in Vicksburg. In pre-Confederate days, he was a Know-Nothing: he won a seat in Congress as such, and participated prominently in his Party's 1856 Convention, which nominated Millard Fillmore for President.
Lake was not so lucky in this campaign: his opponent, Henry C. Chambers, killed him in a duel in October 1861. The subject of the duel is unclear: "...a difficulty occurred and a blow was given, and then a challenge." They fought with rifles at forty paces, each exchanging three shots. On the fourth, Lake fell dead. [Montgomery, Reminiscences of a Mississippian in Peace and War 82.]
This unrecorded Confederate broadside asserts that "we have but one object, namely: to conquer a peace, and secure our national independence. Nor can there be any controversy as to the means necessary to obtain this end. War! War! is the only way. It will, therefore, be seen that there is no chance for party divisions and party issues." Calling for unity, he outlines his military, fiscal, and monetary policies.
Not in Parrish & Willingham, Crandall, Owen, Sabin, Hummel, NUC, or on OCLC, the online site of the Library of Congress, AAS, or other online resources as of July 2017. Item #24873

Price: $3,500.00

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