GROUP OF THREE LOYALTY OATHS SIGNED BY FORMER CONFEDERATES. [1] WHEREAS, ANDREW JOHNSON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, DID, ON THE 7TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D., 1867, ISSUE A PROCLAMATION PROCLAIMING FULL PARDON TO CERTAIN PERSONS ENGAGED IN THE LATE REBELLION, CONDITIONED UPON TAKING AND SUBSCRIBING A CERTAIN OATH THEREIN SET FORTH AND HERETO ATTACHED AND HEREIN INSERTED...'I THOMAS K. DAVIS DO SOLEMNLY SWEAR, [OR AFFIRM,] ..." [At head: Printed and Sold by R.A. Waters, Penn. Ave. Cor. 13th Street. With a postal stamp and Washington DC cancel]. [2] "AMNESTY OATH. I, ARTHUR MCMURTRY, DO SOLEMNLY SWEAR IN THE PRESENCE OF ALMIGHTY GOD THAT I WILL HEREAFTER FAITHFULLY DEFEND THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES AND THE UNION OF STATES THEREUNDER; AND THAT I WILL IN LIKE MANNER ABIDE BY AND SUPPORT ALL LAWS AND PROCLAMATIONS WHICH HAVE BEEN MADE DURING THE EXISTING REBELLION WITH REFERENCE TO THE EMANCIPATION OF SLAVERY; SO HELP ME GOD. SWORN AND SUBSCRIBED TO BEFORE ME THIS 5 DAY OF JULY, 1865, AT GALVESTON, TEXAS." SIGNED BY ARTHUR MCMURTRY AND WITNESSED BY H. BEARD, CAPT. AND PRO. MARSHAL.; [3] "OFFICE OF PROVOST MARSHAL, EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LA. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, JANUARY 30, 1864. I, EDWARD COUSINARD| EAST BATON ROUGE, DO SOLEMNLY SWEAR IN PRESENCE OF ALMIGHTY GOD..." WITNESSED BY DON A. PARDEE, LT. COL. 42ND OHIO VOL. INF'Y & PROVOST MARSHAL AND R.O. WARREN, CLK.

Partly printed documents, completed in manuscript, varying sizes, measuring in the range of 7-7.5" x 9-9.75". Matted and mounted behind glass in a 17" x 34" gilt decorative frame. Very Good.

Former Confederates were required to sign oaths of loyalty before regaining citizenship and voting rights. The language of these three oaths differs slightly, but each requires the signer to "defend the Constitution of the United States," particularly in reference to the emancipation of slaves.
Davis's oath, taken in the District of Columbia, is printed at page 105 of Stanley Turkel's book, "Heroes of the American Reconstruction" [2005]. Davis's background and State of residence are not disclosed. Arthur McMurtry was a corporal in the 26th Texas Cavalry. He is listed in the 1870 Federal Census and two later Galveston directories [1888-1891] as a bookkeeper. Cousinard was mayor of East Baton Rouge from 1857-1859. He enlisted with Company B of the 9th Battalion Louisiana Infantry in 1862. After signing his amnesty oath, he became sheriff of East Baton Rouge on May 11, 1864.
Arthur McMurtry is distantly related to Pulitzer Prize winner Larry McMurtry: his great-grandfather, John McMurtry [1748-1790], was the brother of Larry McMurtry's great-great-great-great-grandfather Samuel McMurtry [1744-1796]. [Lineage determined using several family trees on Ancestry web site and cross-referencing with Federal Censuses, death records and information found on the Texas State Cemetery website.]. Item #25188

Price: $3,000.00

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