IMMEDIATE EMANCIPATION IN MARYLAND. PROCEEDINGS OF THE UNION STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE, AT A MEETING HELD IN TEMPERANCE TEMPLE, BALTIMORE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1863.

Baltimore: Bull & Tuttle, 1863. 20pp. Disbound and lightly worn, small rubberstamp and accession number on blank verso of title page. Good+.

This interesting pamphlet illuminates Maryland's position on Emancipation during the Civil War. As a Loyal State, Maryland was unaffected by the Emancipation Proclamation. The Union Party's spokesman, Thomas Swann, explains the history of emancipation sentiment in Maryland, noting that the paramount value of the Union caused many to "advocate the policy of postponing for a brief season any action upon the subject of Emancipation." He acknowledges Marylanders' "many shades of opinion" on "the most feasible plans for disposing of what remains of Slavery in the State."
Swann argues that slavery is unprofitable, and "has left a very large balance to the debit of the master." Agreeing with Lincoln that compensated emancipation is the best policy, he observes that the fortunes of war have rendered slavery "every day more and more precarious." He urges Maryland to relinquish its "hold upon the crumbling fragments of this sinking institution." Doing so will enhance the prosperity of all. John Pendleton Kennedy seconds Swann's remarks with "unqualified approbation." Approving resolutions are duly adopted.
FIRST EDITION. Bartlett 3016. LCP 6470. Item #26560

Price: $450.00