REPORT ON THE ADDRESS OF A PORTION OF THE MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF GEORGIA. PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE CONVENTION.

Charleston: Evans & Cogswell, Printers to the Convention, 1860. 6, [2 blanks] pp. Disbound and lightly tanned, else Very Good.

This Report, dated December 22 1860, is one of the earliest Confederate imprints, and a significant milestone in the march of the Southern States out of the Union. De Saussure issued it on behalf of a Committee tasked with preparing an Address to the People of the Southern States, justifying South Carolina's recent secession.
Georgia had urged Carolina to refrain from "final separate State action" pending a Convention of the Southern States. De Saussure responds that "South Carolina did not desire to take the lead in secession," but "the blow inflicted by the election of an enemy to Southern institutions, elected by Abolition States upon Abolition issues," was too much to bear. "If a conference of the Southern States is to be had, it can have but two objects: one to patch up a hollow truce with anti-slavery, which denounces our Institution as a crime, and which will hold all the power of the Government in all its departments in all time to come; the other to concert measures for final separation, and for the formation of a Southern Confederacy." The choice is obvious.
III Turnbull 320. De Renne 614. Parrish & Willingham 3815 [11]. Not in LCP. Item #27435

Price: $350.00

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