A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE MALIGNANT FEVER, LATELY PREVALENT IN PHILADELPHIA: WITH A STATEMENT OF THE PROCEEDINGS THAT TOOK PLACE ON THE SUBJECT IN DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES. THIRD EDITION IMPROVED.

Philadelphia: Printed by the Author, November 30, 1793. 112, [8], 16 pp. The final 16 pages are a list of the dead. Disbound, light wear, a couple of marginal rubberstamps by a private owner, trimmed closely at the top margin of the last several leaves [affecting page numbers but not the text]. Good+.

This is Carey's riveting eyewitness account of the 1793 yellow fever epidemic, "which doomed the supremacy of Philadelphia among American cities." V Adams, Dictionary of American History 504. Carey documents Philadelphia's happy prosperity until "the destroying scourge crept in among us, and nipped in the bud the fairest blossoms that imagination could form...Many of our first commercial houses are totally dissolved, by the death of the parties." He recites the different theories of the epidemic's cause-- none anywhere near the mark-- and the efforts taken by City authorities to control the disease and the panic-- all to no avail. This printing was preceded by Carey's printings on November 14, 1793 and November 23, 1793.
Austin 410. Evans 25257. Item #27628

Price: $375.00

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