UNION AND LIBERTY. POWERS OF CONGRESS IN RELATION TO THE SLAVES, WITH A FORM OF ENACTMENT IN CONFORMITY THERETO. ADDRESSED TO A CONGRESSMAN.

np: [1861-1862]. 8pp, caption title [as issued], stitched. Lightly dusted, else Very Good.

It was evidently the habit of this anonymous author to favor his Congressman with a "periodical letter" imparting his counsel. This one was probably written early in the War, because no mention is made of the Emancipation Proclamation; and the author, strongly anti-slavery, proposes a plan of compensated emancipation for slaveholders who have remained loyal to the Union.
Probably law-trained, he argues that the Constitution "neither sanctions the principle of slavery, nor pledges the perpetuity of it." It protects certain incidents of slavery, such as the rendition of fugitives. But "the interest of slaveholding was a perennial source of sentiment alien to the Constitution in spirit and letter." Nevertheless, through the political power of the slaveholding interest "ours became a slavery Constitution, and we a slave-holding people." With the treason of the South, maintenance of slavery is no longer necessary to achieve the Founders' "design of a more perfect union." His proposal is a statute freeing the slaves, placing them "on an equal footing with all other people," and compensating their loyal former owners.
Sabin 40254. OCLC 44103245 [9], as of January 2017. Not in Bartlett, LCP, or Blockson. Item #28172

Price: $350.00

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