THOUGHTS UPON THE POLITICAL SITUATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, IN WHICH THAT OF MASSACHUSETTS IS MORE PARTICULARLY CONSIDERED. WITH SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE CONSTITUTION FOR A FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. ADDRESSED TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNION. BY A NATIVE OF BOSTON. Jonathan Jackson.

THOUGHTS UPON THE POLITICAL SITUATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, IN WHICH THAT OF MASSACHUSETTS IS MORE PARTICULARLY CONSIDERED. WITH SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE CONSTITUTION FOR A FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. ADDRESSED TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNION. BY A NATIVE OF BOSTON.

Worcester, Massachusetts: Isaiah Thomas, 1788. 209, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, light foxing, some spotting, Good+.

Jackson examines the Colonies' transition from subordination to independence. England's "avaricious, unfeeling disposition, towards those who had sprang from them, and were willing still to continue by their side," led it "to such acts and declarations, as gave a just alarm to every independent American; and forced each one of them, who reasoned at all, to decide, whether he would submit unconditionally to the impositions of Great Britain, or risque the issue by the best opposition in his power."
As capable and enterprising people, separated from European quarrels, Americans must create a government that will bring peace "among themselves" and "secure them against any attacks from without." Though he concedes that the proposed Constitution has flaws, Jackson vigorously defends, rebutting anti-Federalist arguments. "We have tried our separate sovereignties long enough to see, to feel, that they are puny governments only, while not cemented by one common interest-- while not assisted by some higher authority, established equally by all, and common to all."
FIRST EDITION. Howes J23. Evans 21173. Streeter Sale 1051. Not in Church, Larned. Item #29082

Price: $2,500.00

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