JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEING THE FIRST SESSION OF THE THIRD CONGRESS, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER 2, 1793. [bound with] JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEING THE SECOND SESSION OF THE THIRD CONGRESS, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, NOVEMBER 3, 1794. Third Congress United States.
JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEING THE FIRST SESSION OF THE THIRD CONGRESS, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER 2, 1793. [bound with] JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEING THE SECOND SESSION OF THE THIRD CONGRESS, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, NOVEMBER 3, 1794.

JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEING THE FIRST SESSION OF THE THIRD CONGRESS, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER 2, 1793. [bound with] JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEING THE SECOND SESSION OF THE THIRD CONGRESS, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, NOVEMBER 3, 1794.

Philadelphia: John Fenno, 1793 [i.e., 1794] & 1794. Folio. 205, [1 blank]; 114, [12] pp. Each Journal is a separate imprint with separate title page, each complete with Index, bound together in contemporary sheep [spine worn and darkened]. Bit of endpaper spotting, Very Good.

These documents print Messages of President Washington, including his December 1793 Address opening the Session, his first Message to Congress since his re-election. He warns, "The United States ought not to indulge a persuasion, that, contrary to the order of human events, they will, for ever, keep at a distance those painful appeals to arms, with which the history of every other nation abounds. There is a rank due to the United States among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness." Washington urges fairness in commerce with the Indians: "It ought to be conducted without fraud, without extortion, with constant and plentiful supplies."
Washington is profoundly annoyed with Citizen Genet, who has sought "to involve us in war abroad, and discord and anarchy at home." The First Session records Federalists' successful challenge to Albert Gallatin's election as Senator from Pennsylvania, on the ground that he had not satisfied the Constitution's nine-year citizenship requirement. Affidavits and other information are printed regarding Gallatin's early years in the country. Also discussed are fiscal matters; the Bank of the United States; the treaty with England and other foreign policy issues; protection of the frontier and military questions; the Eleventh Amendment to the Constitution, withdrawing federal courts' jurisdiction of suits against a State by citizens of another State; and a host of other matters. The Session closed in May 1794.
The President's Message opening the Second Session focuses on the Whisky Rebellion, the major domestic event of the day. Washington recounts the attacks upon federal officers, including the kidnapping of a federal marshal; and his careful, measured response, finally calling out the militia. The Second Session devotes much attention to matters affecting the militia, and issues involving Creek Indian lands within the State of Georgia.
Evans 27911, 29724. Item #29085

Price: $1,500.00