SHALL CRIMINALS SIT ON THE JURY? A REVIEW OF GOVERNOR ANDREW'S VETO, WITH OTHER DOCUMENTS ON THE SUBJECT.

Boston: Published by the Massachusetts Temperance Alliance, 1865. Stitched in original printed orange wrappers [lightly dusted]. 70, [2 blanks] pp. Very Good plus. 'Read and Circulate' is printed at the head of the front wrapper and the title. Ownership signature on front wrapper of F. C. [?] Baxter.

Miner was a minister; Pitman was a State Senator closely identified with the Temperance and Prohibition movement. That movement had succeeded in enacting a law prohibiting and rendering criminal the sale or production of alcoholic beverages. The proposed Massachusetts Jury Bill-- which Governor Andrew vetoed-- required a juror to be of "good moral character," which meant that the prospective juror was not "engaged in any business or occupation made criminal by the laws of the Commonwealth," i.e., the liquor trade.
Miner deplores Boston's effective nullification of the prohibitory law. Indeed, he says, the City "defiantly resists the execution of the law." Though unmentioned, much of Miner's ire is directed at the habits of the Boston Irish; Governor Andrew's veto was the result, in part, of his stated fear that the Bill would be employed to discriminate against prospective jurors based on their religion or national origin. Senator Pitman's speech seeks passage of the Jury Bill over the Governor's veto. Press criticism of the veto is also printed.
Sabin 49198. Item #29305

Price: $250.00

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