SIXTH BRIGADE, N.Y.S. ARTILLERY. BRIGADE ORDERS. NEW-YORK, APRIL 5TH, 1844.| CAPTAIN OLNEY WILL REPORT HIMSELF, AND COMMAND FORTHWITH TO JOSEPH SPRAGUE, ESQ., MAYOR OF THE CITY OF BROOKLYN, FOR DUTY, UNDER WHOSE DIRECTION HE WILL ACT.| BY ORDER OF BRIGADIER GENERAL MORRIS| JAMES PHALON, BRIG. MAJOR AND INSPECTOR.| BROOKLYN CITY GUARD.| COMPANY ORDER.| IN PURSUANCE OF THE FOREGOING ORDER, YOU ARE HEREBY REQUIRED TO APPEAR AT THE ARMORY, THIS, FRIDAY EVENING, AT 8 O'CLOCK.| BY ORDER OF JAMES N. OLNEY, CAPTAIN B.C.G.| JOHN M. PRATT, ORDERLY.

New York: 1844. Broadside, 5.8' x 8.5". Light edgewear, scattered foxing, two light folds. Good+.

These broadside orders were issued in response to Anti-Irish, Know-Nothing disturbances that were breaking out in Brooklyn. On the date of this broadside a riot occurred when nativist men threatened to burn down a local Catholic church. The Brooklyn City Guard was formed in August 1842, as a volunteer military company. A light artillery unit, it was celebrated by Brooklynites as a fashionable outfit known for its drills, parades, and balls. Songs-- "The Brooklyn City Guard Quick Step" and "Olney's Quick Step"-- were composed in the Guard's honor. James N. Olney was its first Captain, a position he held for several years; he then moved to California during the Gold Rush, where he became a leader of the San Francisco Vigilance Committee; he would command the 2nd California Regiment in the Civil War.
The Guard remained an independent organization until 1847, when it joined with the 13th New York Regiment.
Howard: THE EAGLE AND BROOKLYN... VOL. 2. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle: 1893. Page 837. Item #29583

Price: $150.00