SPEECH OF THE HON. LANGDON CHEVES, DELIVERED BEFORE THE DELEGATES OF THE NASHVILLE CONVENTION, ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1850. PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

Columbia, S.C. From the Steam-Power Press of I.C. Morgan, State Printer. 1850. 19, [1 blank] pp. Disbound. Outer margin trimmed closely to text, just shaving portions of a letter from time to time. Good+.

"On June 3 the delegates of nine southern states met in convention at Nashville. Here was the end product of years of effort on the part of militant southerners to secure a united South. During the preceding winter, when southerners felt the duress of the Wilmot Proviso about to be imposed, they had looked to this meeting of the southern states as the beginning of a new era for the South...For the first time, the southern states, by standing together, would compel a recognition of their rights within the Union or would move by concerted action to go out of it." Potter, Impending Crisis 104.
Cheves describes the "melancholy occasion" of the Convention: the necessity "of defending the Southern States against a great and alarming danger, with which we are not threatened by a foreign foe or a common enemy, but by our fellow-citizens," who wish to tear down Slavery and the Southern Way of Life. He provides a litany of Northern outrages against the South, and warns of the decline of Southern power within the Union.
Howes, LCP, and Turnbull record Cheves's November 14 speech at the Convention but not this one. OCLC lists six locations, as of December 2012. Item #29649

Price: $450.00

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