THE REBEL STATES. THE PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS. RECONSTRUCTION, AND THE EXECUTIVE POWER OF PARDON.

New York: E.S. Dodge & Co., Steam Printers, 1866. Original printed wrappers [lightly chipped], stitched, 15pp. Clean text, Good+.

Amicus issues a powerful dissent from President Andrew Johnson's policy of Reconstruction, particularly his single-handed assumption of power and his issuance of wholesale pardons to former Confederates. Johnson, who had attracted Lincoln's attention for his bravery as wartime Union Governor of Tennessee, did not dislike slavery nearly so much as he resented upper-class plantation owners, who had mocked his lowly upbringing. Once these men groveled at his feet for pardons, Johnson became putty in their hands. Amicus argues that Congress has the power to determine the requirements for readmission of States to the Union, and that Johnson's issuance of pardons before conviction of crime is unconstitutional.
Johnson has unconstitutionally "undertaken to carry out the laws respecting Treason, and to wash the bloody hands of conquered rebels, whether repentant or not, and to place them upon a par with loyal citizens-- the survivors of the many thousands who have been maltreated and murdered, or inhumanly starved to death by the agents of these same States who had confederated together and levied war against the United States!"
FIRST EDITION. Bartlett 4014. Item #29971

Price: $275.00

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