LETTER OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN TO THE MISSOURI RADICALS, AND SPEECH OF S.T. GLOVER, AT THE COURT HOUSE IN JEFFERSON CITY, MO., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17TH, 1863.

[Jefferson City? 1863]. Caption title [as issued]. 18pp. Disbound, margins trimmed closely but without affecting text, light spotting. One small hold in title leaf affects about five letters. Good+.

The subject relates "to a demand" by Missouri Radicals "for the removal of Gen. John M. Schofield" [Monaghan]. The Civil War in Missouri was a continuation of the bitter pre-War battles between Jayhawkers and Border Ruffians over the Kansas Question. Competing Unionist factions-- differing over the status of slavery in Missouri-- sorely vexed Lincoln, who said that their "factional quarrel" had "tormented" him "beyond endurance."
In 1863 he sought to end this strife by naming General Schofield-- whom he had previously relieved-- as Military Commander of Missouri. This move, however, brought the wrath of Radicals down upon Lincoln's head. Lincoln's Letter seeks to placate Charles Drake, leader of the Missouri Radicals, and his colleagues. It describes the tragedy of civil war: "Deception breeds and thrives. Confidence dies, and universal suspicion reigns. Each man feels an impulse to kill his neighbor, lest he be killed by him. Revenge and retaliation follow...Every foul bird comes abroad, and every dirty reptile rises up." He urges unity; Glover's speech chastises the 'Charcoals,' as the Immediate Emancipationists were called, for their unceasing and unreasonable attacks upon the President..
Monaghan 224. Sabin 41150. As of March 2013, OCLC records only six locations, none of them in Missouri. Item #29987

Price: $350.00