PRIVATE VIRTUE AND PUBLICK SPIRIT DISPLAY'D. IN A SUCCINCT ESSAY ON THE CHARACTER OF CAPT. THOMAS CORAM, WHO DECEASED THE 29TH OF MARCH, AND WAS INTERR'D IN THE CHAPEL OF THE FOUNDLING HOSPITAL, (A CHARITY ESTABLISHED BY HIS SOLICITATION) APRIL 24, 1751.

London: Printed for J. Roberts, 1751. [4], 28 pp, with the half title. Disbound with a little roughness along blank inner margin. Very Good.

In 1739 Coram, born in 1668, founded the London Foundling Hospital, considered to be the first incorporated charity. He early saw the value of Nova Scotia and actively promoted its "Advantages arising from Agriculture, Fishing, and Trade." References to other British American colonies are included, including Coram's advocacy of free trade between the colonies and the Mother Country. "To the Inhabitants of the Colonies therefore, there could be nothing more satisfactory, hardly any thing so advantageous." Most interesting of his ideas was "His last Design...a Scheme for uniting the Indians in North America, more closely to the British Interest, by an Establishment for the Education of Indian Girls. This is, indeed, a very political Contrivance; for if the Girls be brought up in Christian Principles, the Indian Children of both Sexes in the next Generation will be brought up Christians. This would be a refined Stroke of Policy."
FIRST EDITION. ESTC T44481. Sabin 65728 [citing the Boston reprint]. Not in TPL, JCB, Eberstadt. Item #31089

Price: $500.00

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