AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED FROM BUFFALO, NEW YORK, JULY 12, 1838, TO LUCIUS F. THAYER OF WESTFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS: "MY DEAR UNCLE LUCIUS... I HAVE BEEN THINKING THAT IF YOU WOULD TAKE ME, I SHOULD LIKE TO LIVE WITH YOU AND LEARN THE FARMING BUSINESS. MY PARENTS THINK THAT I OUGHT TO BE LEARNING SOMETHING WHICH WOULD BE USEFUL TO ME HEREAFTER. I SHOULD LIKE FARMING BETTER THAN ANY TRADE... WE HAVE MOVED FROM LANCASTER AND NOW LIVE IN THE CITY OF BUFFALO. I LIKE OUR SITUATION VERY WELL. PA IS IN MR. VAN BUREN'S LAW OFFICE. BUT I SUPPOSE MA HAS TOLD YOU ALL THESE THINGS. SHE HAS GOT QUITE A LARGE SCHOOL FROM 25 TO 30 SCHOLARS... FOURTH OF JULY IS PAST. IN THE MORNING, THE BELLS COMMENCED RINGING AT SUNRISE AND RANG A HALF AN HOUR... AT ELEVEN O'CLOCK THE SOLDIERS CAME OUT DRESSED IN UNIFORM, FOR THE CAVALRY, THEN THE BUFFALO COMPANY, NEXT THE CITY GUARDS, WHO DEFENDED THE CITY DURING THE LATE DISTURBANCES ON THE FRONTIER. NEXT THE BRADY [?] GUARDS FROM DETROIT AND LAST OF ALL THE ROCHESTER GUARDS. THEY PITCHED THEIR TENTS IN THE PARK BEFORE THE COURT-HOUSE... ON THE FOURTH ALSO THE LIBERTY POLE WAS RAISED THE HIGHEST POLE IN THE UNITED STATES, 160 FEET HIGH, THAT IS AS HIGH AS NIAGARA FALLS...

Buffalo, New York: 1838. Large sheet, 10" x 16", folded to 8" x 10". [4] pp, completely in ink manuscript. Pages [1-2] contains a letter from Fowler T. Brodhead to his uncle; page [3] contains a letter from his mother to his uncle; page [4] is addressed to "Mr. Lucius F. Thayer, Westfield, Hampden Co., Massachusetts" and postmarked "Buffalo, N.Y., Jul 13." Old folds [a few very small holes with loss of only a few letters]. Small hole in outer margin of last page from wax seal [no text affected]. Very Good.

A detailed, interesting description of Buffalo's enthusiastic Fourth of July celebration, and a picture of the early life of one of Buffalo's most prominent teachers. Fowler's mother informs her brother that Fowler does not apply himself. Mrs. Brodhead was exceedingly protective of her only child, who became so dependent on her that, as an adult, he fell mentally ill after her death, abandoned teaching, and became a recluse. He was found dead in the home he had shared with his mother on February 11, 1902, wearing filthy clothes and surrounded by piles of rubbish. It was discovered that he actually had thousands of dollars in savings. ["Man Starves With $4,000 In Savings," THE BUFFALO COURIER, Wednesday, February 12, 1902, page 7.]
Fowler Thayer Brodhead [also Broadhead] [1827-1902] was a linguist as well as a teacher; future President Grover Cleveland was one of his pupils. Fowler became a teacher early, never married, and lived with his parents. Item #32101

Price: $75.00

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