SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS. THIRD GRAND DIVISION. APRIL TERM, A.D. 1862. THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, EX REL. THE CITY OF CHICAGO, VS. ALEXANDER C. COVENTRY, FREDERICK TUTTLE AND WILLIAM WAYMAN. ARGUMENT FOR THE RELATOR, BY B.F. AYER.

Chicago: Chicago Times Book and Job Printing Establishment, 1862. Original printed front wrapper, disbound. 20pp. Good+.

A rare Chicago imprint. The proposed 1862 Illinois Constitution provided for changes in Chicago's Board of Police and for home rule. However, the Constitutional Convention did not require submission of that Section "to the people of the State for their adoption or rejection." Litigation ensued on the question whether, by failing to require submission of the Section to the people for a vote, the Constitutional Convention had exceeded its authority. Opponents of the provision argued that the people, as the ultimate sovereign, had to approve the provision before it could become law. But this Brief argues that the Convention acted properly, and that such a submission was unnecessary.
OCLC 14094515 [2- Lincoln Library, Chicago History Museum] [as of July 2015]. Not in Ante-Fire Imprints [but see Nos. 632 and 633 for other legal material in that case]. Item #32233

Price: $275.00

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