THE BANNER OF THE CONSTITUTION. DEVOTED TO GENERAL POLITICS, POLITICAL ECONOMY, STATE PAPERS, FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC NEWS, &C. EDITED BY CONDY RAGUET, MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY. VOLUME I., NOS. 1-73, DECEMBER 5, 1829 THROUGH NOVEMBER 24, 1830. FIRST OF THREE VOLUMES PUBLISHED.

Washington City: Rothwell and Ustick, 1829-1830. Folio, 582pp plus general title leaf. Volume I comprises 73 issues, from December 5, 1829 through November 24, 1830. Beginning as a weekly, The Banner would appear on Wednesdays and Saturdays starting in January 1830. The final six pages of our copy are bound out of order, but complete: 576, [579-582], [577], 578. Half calf and marbled paper-covered boards [some extremity wear, front hinge just starting]; gilt-lettered black morocco spine labels [rubbed]. Scattered spotting; wear and tear costing several words in the first issue; pages [579-582] clipped at head, costing top line of each of those pages. Good+.

Condy Raguet [1784-1842], born and raised in Philadelphia, was a founder of the Philadelphia Savings Fund Society, the first savings bank in the United States. A Federalist in his early career, he won a seat in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1815, and in the Pennsylvania State Senate in 1818. President Monroe appointed him Consul to Brazil; President J.Q. Adams then made him the first U.S. Ambassador to Brazil.
After the Panic of 1819 Raguet became one of the most important, articulate advocates of free trade in the Nation. Economic opinion in his hometown, Philadelphia, was dominated by protectionists like Mathew Carey. Raguet sought to publish a periodical which would counter Carey's influence and rival Hezekiah Niles's protectionist Weekly Register. Raguet's Prospectus, appearing on the first page of The Banner's first issue, explains his intention to attract "the general reader" to his opinions, and to give The Banner a wider circulation than its predecessor, 'The Free Trade Advocate and Journal of Political Economy.' The Banner would appear in three volumes, expiring in December, 1832. Raguet warns against monopolies, which are "perpetually seeking to enlarge one particular interest at the expense of the rest." The Banner opposed all monopolies, whether agricultural, commercial, or manufacturing; and printed, not only material affecting commercial activities and explaining the benefits of free trade, but all news affecting the polity, including important court cases, Congressional actions, and presidential decisions.
Lomazow 235. OCLC records only a few locations under several accession numbers, as of January 2020. Item #32723

Price: $600.00

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