THE AMERICAN MUSEUM, OR REPOSITORY OF ANCIENT AND MODERN FUGITIVE PIECES, &C. PROSE AND POETICAL. VOLUME II. Matthew Carey.

THE AMERICAN MUSEUM, OR REPOSITORY OF ANCIENT AND MODERN FUGITIVE PIECES, &C. PROSE AND POETICAL. VOLUME II.

Philadelphia: Printed by Mathew Carey, 1787. Volume II, Numbers I-VI [July 1787 - December 1787]. [2- General Title], 600 [except as noted below], 22 [Chronicle and Index], pp. Pages [3]-11 contain the List of Subscribers; page [13] prints Carey's warm dedication of the Volume to Lafayette. Number III, for September, prints the text of the Constitution. Numbers V [November] and VI [December] print the first six Letters of The Federalist. All are complete, except for October [Number IV], which lacks pages 353-360 [articles on silk, premiums offered by AAAS, extraction of the essence of bark, barn swallows, winter clothes, beginning of an Address to the People of Penna.]. One gathering sprung. Very Good, in modern quarter calf and marbled boards.

This remarkable volume is of great significance in the development and reporting of American constitutional and social history. The September issue is credited [along with another Philadelphia publication, 'The Columbian Magazine'] as the first periodical printing of the Constitution of the United States [pages 276-286]. The prefacing paragraph and Preamble are also printed: "The Constitution framed for the united states of America, by a convention of deputies from the states of.....at a session begun May 14, and ended September 17, 1787. We, the people of the united states, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice..." After the Constitution, signatures in type of George Washington and other delegates, listed by state, are printed; followed by Washington's two transmittal letters to the States, and Congress's resolution [signed in type by Charles Thomson as Secretary] "recommending the appointment of state conventions, to consider the preceding constitution".
In support of ratification, the first six Letters of The Federalist appear on pp. 441-446 and 523-534 [November and December]. Alexander Hamilton wrote Federalist I and VI; John Jay wrote II-V. Each is signed 'Publius' and dated from October 30, 1787 to November 17, 1787. Other distinguished Americans, in essays and letters, also wrote on the question of ratification. The actions of various state delegations are recorded. Elbridge Gerry wrote his "reasons for not signing the federal constitution."
As another foundation document, pages 188-192 print the Northwest Ordinance of 1787. Volume II contains many other essays and documents of importance: on money and paper currency; a letter from Jefferson as minister to France; Joel Barlow's July 4, 1787 Oration; Dr. Rush on imprisonment and punishments; deficiencies of the Articles of Confederation expressed by several state delegations; Benjamin Franklin's "Information for those who would wish to remove to America"; speeches and essays analyzing republican government; encouragement to American manufactures; Letters On the Federal Government by 'An American Citizen', analyzing the proposed Constitution; material on Shays' Rebellion, "the late insurrection in Massachusetts"; "Adventures of colonel Daniel Boon"; an account of Dartmouth College; as well as poetry, material on agriculture and industry, and a plethora of other matters. Item #32751

Price: $8,500.00

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