THOUGHTS ON EMIGRATION, IN A LETTER FROM A GENTLEMAN IN PHILADELPHIA, TO HIS FRIEND IN ENGLAND. Thomas Cooper.
THOUGHTS ON EMIGRATION, IN A LETTER FROM A GENTLEMAN IN PHILADELPHIA, TO HIS FRIEND IN ENGLAND.

THOUGHTS ON EMIGRATION, IN A LETTER FROM A GENTLEMAN IN PHILADELPHIA, TO HIS FRIEND IN ENGLAND.

London: 1794. [2], 17 pp, as issued. Mild toning, Very Good. In modern marbled wrappers, with printed title label pasted on front wrapper. Housed in an attractive quarter morocco slipcase.

As a young adult in his native England, "Cooper was intimately involved in contemporary political issues. He became well-known as a lawyer of radical political sentiments." Warned "against seditious speech, Cooper visited the United States in 1793 to prepare a haven for English dissenters. Cooper and his family soon made their visit to the United States permanent by moving to Northumberland, Pennsylvania in 1794." ['Penn Biographies', online archives.upenn.edu].
Here he arranged for the anonymous publication of this pamphlet, encouraging emigration of persons seeking "asylum from civil persecution and religious intolerance"-- "opponents of the present government in England, as being inconsistent with the principles of liberty, and... opponents also of the slave- trade." Since most such prospective emigrants opposed slavery, he advises against settling in the Deep South and assures them that land and opportunity abound elsewhere. Cooper examines advantages and disadvantages of all the States-- focusing particularly on economic opportunity, slavery, climate, land costs, and amenities. Eberstadt summarizes: "Describes the respective merits of lands and inducements to settlement in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky. The latter two territories, while offering many advantages, are deemed unsafe because of the frequent Indian incursions." Cooper concludes that his own Pennsylvania [where, perhaps not coincidentally, he had recently purchased several hundred thousand acres] is the best.
FIRST EDITION. 123 Eberstadt 39. Sabin 95678. ESTC N46500. OCLC records nine locations under several accession numbers as of February 2017. Item #33558

Price: $1,500.00

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