LETTER SIGNED, 25 AUGUST 1884 ON SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD LETTERHEAD, TO STEPHEN B. ELKINS, CHAIRMAN OF THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE. Charles F. Crocker.
LETTER SIGNED, 25 AUGUST 1884 ON SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD LETTERHEAD, TO STEPHEN B. ELKINS, CHAIRMAN OF THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE.

LETTER SIGNED, 25 AUGUST 1884 ON SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD LETTERHEAD, TO STEPHEN B. ELKINS, CHAIRMAN OF THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE.

Four leaves, written in neat ink manuscript on rectos only, docketed on verso of last leaf. Signed in ink by Crocker at the end, with a different pen and in a different hand from the text. Near Fine.

Charles F. Crocker was a Vice President of the Southern Pacific Railroad and the eldest son of Charles Crocker, one of the Big Four railroad men. Young Crocker writes a long, detailed letter to Elkins. A major figure in the Republican Party, Elkins was a wealthy lawyer and industrialist who made his money in railroads, mining, and real estate in New Mexico, and then in West Virginia. He had been New Mexico's territorial delegate to Congress, and would later become Secretary of War. The city of Elkins, West Virginia, bears his name. He managed James Blaine's campaign for the presidency in 1884.
Crocker begins by thanking Elkins for seeing to the interests of the Southern Pacific by "securing a conservative State Platform... Our corporate interests now lie in the success of the Republican Ticket, for which we are exerting ourselves to make a clean sweep." The Ticket, he says, "will help us materially in carrying the State for Blaine and Logan." Crocker worries mainly about the Republican Congressional candidate in San Francisco-- "the united colored vote of this city" is strongly for his Democratic opponent. Crocker urges a major effort to overturn this unreasonable allegiance. Item #33592

Price: $275.00