THE ACCURSED THING MUST BE TAKEN AWAY FROM AMONG A PEOPLE, IF THEY WOULD REASONABLY HOPE TO STAND BEFORE THEIR ENEMIES. A SERMON PREACHED AT THE THURSDAY-LECTURE IN BOSTON, SEPTEMBER 3, 1778. AND PRINTED AT THE DESIRE OF THE HEARERS. Charles Chauncy.
THE ACCURSED THING MUST BE TAKEN AWAY FROM AMONG A PEOPLE, IF THEY WOULD REASONABLY HOPE TO STAND BEFORE THEIR ENEMIES. A SERMON PREACHED AT THE THURSDAY-LECTURE IN BOSTON, SEPTEMBER 3, 1778. AND PRINTED AT THE DESIRE OF THE HEARERS.

THE ACCURSED THING MUST BE TAKEN AWAY FROM AMONG A PEOPLE, IF THEY WOULD REASONABLY HOPE TO STAND BEFORE THEIR ENEMIES. A SERMON PREACHED AT THE THURSDAY-LECTURE IN BOSTON, SEPTEMBER 3, 1778. AND PRINTED AT THE DESIRE OF THE HEARERS.

Boston, New-England: Thomas & John Fleet, 1778. 27, [1 blank] pp, with the half title. Stitched, untrimmed. Scattered foxing. Ownership signature of Cotton Tufts. Good+.

In resisting Episcopal designs to establish a religion in the Colonies, Chauncy helped fuse religious conviction with political agitation against British domination of American life. He is justly credited with a role in establishing the idea of American independence, and was a key supporter of the American Revolution. Here he warns against "oppression of the poor, the fatherless, and the widow." Such "accursed" sin must be removed, in order to gain God's favor in the struggle for independence.
Chauncy thus denounces "that injustice, which, like an overbearing flood, has made its way through these American states; occasioned partly by the paper currency, partly by the necessities of people in this day of general calamity, but principally by the undue love of money." The cure is "a law of this State" restricting interest rates. Although "the emission of paper bills was necessary to the carrying on the war," unfortunately "the depreciation has been amazingly great, and hundreds and thousands of helpless widows and orphans, to say nothing of others, have been reduced to the utmost distress." Clergy and others on fixed income have also suffered from the paper glut. Chauncy describes the effects of the financial crisis upon ordinary citizens. Recent reverses in the struggle for independence, like the delay in the arrival of French assistance, are an example of "divine chastisement." Sabin felt the sermon "Contains historical notes and other enlargements not quite appropriate to the pulpit."
FIRST EDITION. Evans 15759. Sabin 12309. Not in Gephart. Item #34250

Price: $1,000.00