AN ADDRESS TO THE REPUBLICANS AND PEOPLE OF NEW-YORK, PENNSYLVANIA, AND VIRGINIA. UPON THE STATE OF PRESIDENTIAL PARTIES. BY A CITIZEN OF NEW-YORK. SEPTEMBER, 1824.

New York: William Grattan, 1824. 23, [1 blank] pp. Disbound and loosening. Signature of R.J. Ingersoll on front wrapper, probably the Connecticut politician and lawyer who was Speaker of the Connecticut House of Representatives at the time of this publication, and later an anti-Jackson Congressman. Except as noted, Very Good.

An interesting, scarce analysis of the 1824 election, with an eye on the impact of the electoral college, written during the campaign. This was the most complicated presidential election in our history, there being four strong candidates. Jackson is a man "of temper so violent and uncontrolable, and of conduct so arbitrary" that he "would scarcely be restrained by the inconvenient limits of the constitution and laws." Adams and Crawford, the beneficiaries of an unfortunate political tradition of elevating Cabinet officers to the Presidency, are no match for Clay, whose integrity and spirit of unity and compromise render him acceptable to all sections.
Wise & Cronin 138. Not in Miles. Sabin 441 (later variant). Item #34265

Price: $350.00