CONSTITUTION OF THE NEW-ENGLAND ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY: WITH AN ADDRESS TO THE PUBLIC. New England Anti-Slavery Society:.

CONSTITUTION OF THE NEW-ENGLAND ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY: WITH AN ADDRESS TO THE PUBLIC.

Boston: Garrison and Knapp, 1832. Original wrappers, stitched, 16pp. Light to moderate foxing, Good+.

This is the call to arms of the Abolition Movement in the United States-- preceding the formation of the American Anti-Slavery Society-- in the wake of the Nat Turner uprising.
Emphasizing the Society's significance and the crucial role of its Secretary, William Lloyd Garrison, Weinstein says, "The society was the first to demand the unconditional and immediate (without expatriation) abolition of slavery, and the most dreaded abolitionist in America helped generate its preamble, official address, and constitution." The Address rests its case on the Declaration of Independence: "all men are created equal." It adds practical urgency by warning that emancipation is necessary "to prevent the scenes of St. Domingo from being acted here" And it announces its plans: "we consider it our imperious duty...incessantly to appeal to every principle of humanity, benevolence, justice and natural affection, in behalf of that degraded and wretched class of our colored brethren, who are retained in ignominious and cruel bondage. We believe that slavery is an evil now; and, of course, the slaves ought to be now emancipated."
FIRST EDITION. Weinstein 61. Dumond 83. Sabin 52655n. LCP 6496. Item #34440

Price: $750.00