STATE TICKET. DURING THE SESSION OF THE SUPERIOR COURT AT HARTFORD, FEBRUARY 1820, AT A TIME WHEN THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE WERE ABLY REPRESENTED, BY GENTLEMEN OF THE FIRST DISTINCTION FROM EVERY COUNTY, WHO, TO SAY THE LEAST, WERE SUFFICIENTLY INTERESTED IN THE WELFARE OF THE PEOPLE - THE FOLLOWING NOMINATION WAS UNANIMOUSLY SUPPORTED AS THE ONLY DENIER MEASURE BY WHICH THEIR DESTINIES CAN BE AVERTED, FROM THE AWFUL VORTEX TO WHICH THEY ARE SO RAPIDLY BORNE. JOHN COTTON SMITH, GOVERNOR... TO THE SUPPORT OF WHICH TICKET WE HONESTLY AND ZEALOUSLY CALL FOR THE UNITED EFFORTS OF ALL GOOD MEN. Connecticut.

STATE TICKET. DURING THE SESSION OF THE SUPERIOR COURT AT HARTFORD, FEBRUARY 1820, AT A TIME WHEN THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE WERE ABLY REPRESENTED, BY GENTLEMEN OF THE FIRST DISTINCTION FROM EVERY COUNTY, WHO, TO SAY THE LEAST, WERE SUFFICIENTLY INTERESTED IN THE WELFARE OF THE PEOPLE - THE FOLLOWING NOMINATION WAS UNANIMOUSLY SUPPORTED AS THE ONLY DENIER MEASURE BY WHICH THEIR DESTINIES CAN BE AVERTED, FROM THE AWFUL VORTEX TO WHICH THEY ARE SO RAPIDLY BORNE. JOHN COTTON SMITH, GOVERNOR... TO THE SUPPORT OF WHICH TICKET WE HONESTLY AND ZEALOUSLY CALL FOR THE UNITED EFFORTS OF ALL GOOD MEN.

[Hartford? 1820]. Folio broadside, 7 1/4" x 12 1/4". Light old folds, Near Fine.

The Federalist Party, which dominated early Connecticut politics, was aligned with Connecticut's established church, the Congregationalists, to which all residents were required to pay tithes. Other denominations, deeply resentful, formed the Toleration Party in 1816, comprising Episcopalians, Methodists, Baptists, Unitarians and Universalists, as well as Jeffersonians. In 1817 the Toleration Party won the governorship and took a majority of the State Assembly, ousting Governor John Cotton Smith and his Federal Party. The Federalists set out to take the State back. This Federalist assembly nominated former Governor Smith and his reliably Federalist colleagues in an effort to do so.
Apologizing for their nominees' participation in the embarrassing Hartford Convention, the broadside states, "It is true some of them represented the state in the memorable Hartford Convention, and were advocates of the appropriation act; but we trust the people are well satisfied that they have become thoroughly convinced of their error, and are now ready to atone for their misjudged acts, by becoming the humble servants of the people."
Not in Sabin or American Imprints, or the online sites of OCLC, AAS, CT Historical Society, Yale as of March 2018. Item #34747

Price: $500.00

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