NOTEBOOK KEPT BY HARVARD LAW STUDENT ARNOLD M. GOLDSTEIN FOR A CLASS IN PUBLIC UTILITIES LAW, TAUGHT BY PROFESSOR FELIX FRANKFURTER, 1934-1935. Felix Frankfurter.
NOTEBOOK KEPT BY HARVARD LAW STUDENT ARNOLD M. GOLDSTEIN FOR A CLASS IN PUBLIC UTILITIES LAW, TAUGHT BY PROFESSOR FELIX FRANKFURTER, 1934-1935.
NOTEBOOK KEPT BY HARVARD LAW STUDENT ARNOLD M. GOLDSTEIN FOR A CLASS IN PUBLIC UTILITIES LAW, TAUGHT BY PROFESSOR FELIX FRANKFURTER, 1934-1935.
NOTEBOOK KEPT BY HARVARD LAW STUDENT ARNOLD M. GOLDSTEIN FOR A CLASS IN PUBLIC UTILITIES LAW, TAUGHT BY PROFESSOR FELIX FRANKFURTER, 1934-1935.

NOTEBOOK KEPT BY HARVARD LAW STUDENT ARNOLD M. GOLDSTEIN FOR A CLASS IN PUBLIC UTILITIES LAW, TAUGHT BY PROFESSOR FELIX FRANKFURTER, 1934-1935.

[Harvard Law School: 1934-1935]. 4to. Notebook from the Harvard Coop in contemporary half calf and pebbled cloth, stamped 'Record' in gilt on the spine. 174, [4] manuscript pages in neat blue and red ink; other notes tipped in neatly.

Felix Frankfurter (1882-1965) was the leading professor of the law of the modern Administrative State. He taught at Harvard Law School from 1914 to 1939. A reform-minded public intellectual, he was a trusted adviser to President Roosevelt in the New Deal years. Roosevelt nominated him to the United States Supreme Court after Justice Cardozo died in 1938. An acrimonious confirmation hearing-- emphasizing Frankfurter's foreign birth [with the usual anti-Semitic subtext] and his close relationship with President Roosevelt-- ensued. He took his seat on the Court in January 1939 and served for the next 23 years.
These detailed lecture notes, taken by an obviously conscientious and motivated student in the Class of 1935, are a magnificent window on Professor Frankfurter's teaching style and methods at one of the Nation's premier law schools during an exciting era of legal transition. The class concerned Public Utilities, a particular branch of administrative law. As Goldstein notes, "Course is on the law of the I.C.C. P.U.'s have always been subj. to regulation. Comprehensive regulation dates from the I.C.A. of 1887." The undated notes include citations to decisions made as late as March 1934 (page 4). Goldstein's thorough, well-organized, and legible notes reflect Frankfurter's close attention to the details of statutes and case law, and the context in which cases and legislation arose. They offer insight into Frankfurter's thoughts on the powers of the national government as it underwent a major expansion in order to deal with the Depression crisis. For example, here is a summary of Frankfurter's thoughts on a recent New Deal construction project in Los Angeles: "Jan. 1932, plans presented for Union Station. Construction work is going ahead under State RR commission's order. There is cooperation between State and ICC. . . . Was a great litigation. All civic organizations were interested; prop[erty] values were affected; all residents of Los Angeles were concerned; scenic interests were at stake; nature of RR's holding of prop[erty] was involved' (pp. 146-7).
The note-taker, Arnold M. Goldstein (1910-2007), became a New York lawyer. His New York Times obituary [December 18, 2007] said that he was a practicing lawyer for sixty years. Item #35045

Price: $3,500.00

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