A CONTINUATION OF THE NARRATIVE OF THE INDIAN CHARITY SCHOOL, BEGUN IN LEBANON, IN CONNECTICUT; NOW INCORPORATED WITH DARTMOUTH-COLLEGE, IN HANOVER, IN THE PROVINCE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. WITH A DEDICATION TO THE HONORABLE TRUST IN LONDON. TO WHICH IS ADDED AN ACCOUNT OF MISSIONS THE LAST YEAR, IN AN ABSTRACT FROM THE JOURNAL OF THE REV'D MR. FRISBIE, MISSIONARY. BY...PRESIDENT OF DARTMOUTH COLLEGE.

Hartford: Printed by Ebenezer Watson, near the Great Bridge, 1775. vii, [1 blank, [9]-31, [1 blank] pp, as issued. Untrimmed, generously margined, title leaf with some foxing. Else Very Good in later half morocco with gilt rules, marbled boards, and gilt-stamped title on front cover. Engraved bookplate of Lucius Barnes Barbour, collector of Connecticut genealogical material and appointed as "the first Public Records Examiner at the Connecticut State Library in 1911" [online site of the CT State Library].

"This is the ninth, and last, of the Reports of the Indian Charity School, established by Mr. Wheelock. It was originally termed the Moors Charity School, commencing in 1754, at Lebanon, and in 1771 transferred to Hanover, where it formed the germ of the institution, known as Dartmouth College. Among the first pupils came young Brant, the Mohawk warrior, who afterwards desolated the Wyoming Valley, and sat beside the Mohegan Indian, Samson Occom, who preached the gospel of peace to the same bloody savages. The fruits of the noble and disinterested labors of Mr. Wheelock, were visible among the aborigines for many years after the date of this report. At one time twenty-five Indians were receiving instruction in his school. Honored be the name of Eleazer Wheelock during all time, as one of the wisest and noblest friends of the red man" [Field].
"Wheelock, a graduate from Yale in 1733, was pastor of the Second (North) Society in Lebanon, and a popular preacher during the Great Awakening. He began the Charity School (first called More's Charity School, after Col. Joshua More, who contributed a house and school-house) in 1754, and by 1765 had some forty-six pupils, all supported by charity. In 1769 Wheelock was given a charter to establish Dartmouth College, which he did in 1770, and became its first president" [Streeter Sale]. Wheelock's plan for the School, formed to instruct Indians and train them "as missionaries and teachers to their respective tribes" [DAB], evidently was inspired by his having taught Samson Occom in the 1740's.
This pamphlet is its first issue [Bristol]. An Appendix, with pages 33-54 and separate title page, was later added, "containing a short narrative of the mission of the Rev. Mr. Levi Frisbie, Mr. James Deanes, and Mr. Thomas Kendal, the Indians in the Province of Quebec."
Evans 14623. Bristol B4168. VII Streeter Sale 4062. Field 1645 [second issue]. ESTC W37586. Trumbull 1627. Item #35472

Price: $1,500.00