MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF LIBERIA TO THE TWO HOUSES OF THE LEGISLATURE AT THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE SESSION OF 1868.

Monrovia: J.W. Barbour, Printer, 1869. Original printed wrappers, stitched. 22, [2 blank] pp. Front wrapper with the ink signature, 'Hon. John Bright'; and postal cancel dated Aug. 17 1869. Signed in type at the end 'James S. Payne. Monrovia, December 10th, 1868.' Light wear, Very Good.

Governor James S. Payne is pleased with Liberia's progress, but counsels, "We should not consider ourselves beyond danger because we have sustained our institutions so far. Our history is too brief, our existence too recent, our situation too peculiar, to so consider ourselves." He warns of "the disposition of Christian governments to acquire sections of the African continent." But he expresses "admiration of the interest taken by all enlightened powers, with few exceptions, in the abolishment of the African slave-trade," and is pleased that "The Republic of Liberia continues to be an object of sympathetic interest, and has the sincere aspirations for her prosperity and success of the best men and wisest nations of the earth." He is particularly glad that the United States has given the Slaves freedom, and expresses Liberia's "high appreciation of this great act of justice of the Government of the United States."
Governor Payne urges "adoption of a compulsory educational system for the whole country." He also seeks to improve "the circumstances of our aboriginal population," and appeals "to the colored men of the United States of North-America and elsewhere, and invite them, on the most liberal terms," to immigrate to the "struggling infant state."
163 Eberstadt 45. Not in LCP or Blockson. OCLC 26217788 [2- DLC, NYPL] as if April 2019. Item #35772

Price: $950.00

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