A FAMILIAR EPISTLE TO ROBERT J. WALKER, FORMERLY OF PENNSYLVANIA, LATER OF MISSISSIPPI, MORE RECENTLY OF WASHINGTON, AND LAST HEARD OF IN MR. COXWELL'S BALLOON. FROM AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE. TO WHICH IS PREFIXED A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. Robert J. Walker, George McHenry.
A FAMILIAR EPISTLE TO ROBERT J. WALKER, FORMERLY OF PENNSYLVANIA, LATER OF MISSISSIPPI, MORE RECENTLY OF WASHINGTON, AND LAST HEARD OF IN MR. COXWELL'S BALLOON. FROM AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE. TO WHICH IS PREFIXED A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.

A FAMILIAR EPISTLE TO ROBERT J. WALKER, FORMERLY OF PENNSYLVANIA, LATER OF MISSISSIPPI, MORE RECENTLY OF WASHINGTON, AND LAST HEARD OF IN MR. COXWELL'S BALLOON. FROM AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE. TO WHICH IS PREFIXED A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.

London: Saunders, Otley, and Co., 1863. Original printed wrappers, stitched. xiii, [1 blank], 57, [1] pp. Light wear, Very Good. Signed in type at page 57, "Jonathan Slingsby, of Screamersville." Contemporary ownership signature on front wrapper, inscription on half title.

The pamphlet is an amusing attack on Walker, an unscrupulously ambitious man who "was once a man of mark in America." A "shrewd and plausible young Yankee," he moved to Mississippi, where he became an owner of slaves and established himself by expressing "the most violent advocacy of State rights and Slavery. In fact, like most men of Northern birth domiciled in the South, he out-heroded Herod in his violent affection for Southern doctrines and interests." He was rewarded with several prominent political appointments, including the United States Senate and Secretary of the Treasury.
Walker climbed the political ladder by urging recognition of Texas as a Slave State and the expansion of Slavery, and by denouncing "Abolitionists and Englishmen, whom he placed in the same category." These positions are "in fact, the very reverse, in practice and in profession, of all he now presumes to preach to the people of England." As a supporter of the Union in the Civil War, Walker had been sent to England in 1863 as financial agent of the United States; he secured a loan of $250,000,000 for the Union war effort.
The author, George McHenry, haled from Philadelphia. He owned a shipping business between Philadelphia and Liverpool. He became a Confederate diplomat, based, like Walker, in London; and sought financing for the Confederacy.
LCP 6218. Bartlett 5638. Sabin 43305. Item #35928

Price: $375.00