JOURNAL OF THE THIRD SESSION OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER 6TH, 1790. AND IN THE FIFTEENTH YEAR OF THE SOVEREIGNTY OF THE SAID UNITED STATES. Third Session First Congress.

JOURNAL OF THE THIRD SESSION OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BEGUN AND HELD AT THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER 6TH, 1790. AND IN THE FIFTEENTH YEAR OF THE SOVEREIGNTY OF THE SAID UNITED STATES.

Philadelphia: John Fenno, 1791. 203pp. Folio. Original blind-ruled calf [lightly rubbed, rehinged]. Light scattered foxing, Very Good.

This was an eventful Session of the first Senate. In late December 1790, the Journal records the receipt from Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury, of a report "containing a plan for a national Bank." The Journal records the legislative history of the Bank's creation, commencing with the introduction and reading of the 'Bill to incorporate the subscribers to the bank of ---.' Yeas and nays are recorded on motions concerning the term of incorporation; whether the United States should refrain from incorporating any other bank during that term; and, finally, the Bill as passed by Congress [pp 124-131].
The establishment of Washington D.C. as the "seat of government" occurs, with President Washington's directions "to survey and limit a part of the territory of ten miles square, on both sides of the river Powtomac..." The Journal also records the detailed steps by which Vermont and Kentucky were admitted to the Union. Constituent documents are printed relinquishing New York's claims to territory in Vermont, establishing Vermont's boundaries, and Vermont's ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Detailed material also appears on import taxes on distilled spirits; reduction of public debt; creation of the general land office; and a host of other foundation material before the March 4 adjournment.
President Washington warns of Indian depredations in the Northwest Territory and urges "that the aggressors should be made sensible that the government of the Union is not less capable of punishing their crimes, than it is disposed to respect their rights and reward their attachments." The Session records much activity in confirming the titles of the settlers in that Territory to the lands possessed by them, and raising an additional regiment to protect the frontiers.
FIRST EDITION. Evans 23901. Item #36202

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