LETTERS OF THE LATE BISHOP ENGLAND TO THE HON. JOHN FORSYTH, ON THE SUBJECT OF DOMESTIC SLAVERY: TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED COPIES, IN LATIN AND ENGLISH, OF THE POPE'S APOSTOLIC LETTER, CONCERNING THE AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE, WITH SOME INTRODUCTORY REMARKS, ETC. John England, Bishop of Charleston.
LETTERS OF THE LATE BISHOP ENGLAND TO THE HON. JOHN FORSYTH, ON THE SUBJECT OF DOMESTIC SLAVERY: TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED COPIES, IN LATIN AND ENGLISH, OF THE POPE'S APOSTOLIC LETTER, CONCERNING THE AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE, WITH SOME INTRODUCTORY REMARKS, ETC.

LETTERS OF THE LATE BISHOP ENGLAND TO THE HON. JOHN FORSYTH, ON THE SUBJECT OF DOMESTIC SLAVERY: TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED COPIES, IN LATIN AND ENGLISH, OF THE POPE'S APOSTOLIC LETTER, CONCERNING THE AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE, WITH SOME INTRODUCTORY REMARKS, ETC.

Baltimore: Printed and Published by John Murphy, 1844. xi, [1 blank], [13]-156 pp. Stitched in original printed wrappers [spine wrapper chipped at head and tail]. Near Fine.

The Irish Patriot Daniel O'Connell had claimed that "the Pope's denunciation of the African slave trade" also included a denunciation of Slavery. O'Connell's "mischief" in "misconstru[ing] the Pope's" Message with "unprincipled polemics" ignores Slavery's "ameliorating influences on a state ordained of God, yet liable, like most other social institutions, to manifold and great abuses." The pamphlet prints the Apostolic Message and concludes: "There is no danger, no possibility, that Catholic theology should ever be tinctured with the fanaticism of abolition."
John England, born in Ireland, was the first Roman Catholic Bishop of Charleston, South Carolina. His flock included Blacks, to whom he regularly preached and for whom he operated a school which, after an 1835 riot, he was forced to close. The Bishop's eighteen Letters to the Georgian John Forsyth, U.S. Secretary of State from 1834-1841, were all written from Charleston during 1840 and 1841. Bursting with learned historical and theological references and frequent quotations in Latin, they demonstrate "the divine sanction for the existence of slavery and for the various titles by which property in slaves may be acquired... It would rest upon those who deny its religious legality to-day, to prove distinctly that this sanction had been withdrawn." England thought that, compared with the condition of the Irish peasantry, American slaves were not badly treated.
LCP 3491. AI 44-2224 [5]. Sabin 22587. Item #36207

Price: $450.00