HENRICO COUNTY. MESSRS. JOS. C. BURTON, GARLAND HANES, JAS. T. REDD: GENTLEMEN, - I HAVE RECEIVED A COMMUNICATION, SIGNED BY YOURSELVES AND ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-EIGHT OTHER CITIZENS OF HENRICO COUNTY, CALLING UPON ME 'AS ONE WHO WILL TRULY REPRESENT THE SENTIMENTS OF A MAJORITY OF THE PEOPLE OF HENRICO,' TO ALLOW YOU TO USE MY NAME AS A CANDIDATE FOR HENRICO FOR THE CONVENTION.

Richmond: Jan. 24, 1861. Broadside, 4-7/8" x 8-1/4," laid down on plain paper. Light spotting, Good+.

Williams Carter Wickham reluctantly agrees to candidacy as a delegate to Virginia's upcoming Secession Convention. "Should you elect me, I will devote myself to secure all our rights as Virginians and as Southern men, and to the preservation of the Union." Failing such efforts, "I would endeavor to secure the peaceable seperation [sic] of the States, and then forming a common compact with the South, maintain by force of arms our every right." His postscript assures that he will be happy with the selection of another "conservative... from your own county."
Wickham became Henrico's delegate. Originally voting against secession in early April, he reluctantly changed his mind after Lincoln called on Virginia to contribute troops to suppress the insurrection. He became a Confederate General of Cavalry. After the War, having considered secession a great mistake, he became a Republican, a railroad entrepreneur, and a supporter of Ulysses Grant'.
Not in Haynes, Hummel, or on OCLC or the online sites of AAS, U VA, Lib. VA as of January 2020. Item #36506

Price: $1,500.00

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