TWENTY-NINE ISSUES OF 'THE NEW-HAVEN GAZETTE, AND THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE,' VOLUME I, MARCH 2, 1786 THROUGH NOVEMBER 23, 1786. Josiah Meigs, Eleutheros Dana.

TWENTY-NINE ISSUES OF 'THE NEW-HAVEN GAZETTE, AND THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE,' VOLUME I, MARCH 2, 1786 THROUGH NOVEMBER 23, 1786.

New Haven: Printed and Published by Meigs & Dana, in Chapel-Street, 1786. The following issues from Volume I [all 1786]: Nos. 3 [March 2], 4 [March 9], 5 [March 16], 6 [March 23], 8 [April 6], 10 [April 20], 11 [April 27], 12 [May 4], 13 [May 11], 14 [May 18], 15 [May 25], 17 [June 8], 21 [July 6], 22 [July 13], 23 [July 20; only 4pp as issued]; 25 [August 3], 27 [August 17], 28 [August 24], 31 [September 14], 32 [September 21], 33 [September 28], 34 [October 5, lacking the last leaf], 35 [October 12], 36 [October 19], 37 [October 26], 38 [November 2], 39 [November 9], 40 [November 16], 41 [November 23], Each issue 8pp, with continuous pagination, printed in three columns per page; disbound [sometimes roughly, some loosening], scattered light to moderate foxing, infrequent loss of a few words, small area has been removed from several issues. Good+.

'The New Haven Gazette, and Connecticut Magazine,' a weekly newspaper in quarto, was founded in 1786. Its first number issued in February; its final number on June 18, 1789. Highlights of this newspaper, primarily discussions on politics and culture, include a running article by Lycurgus [probably Meigs], OBSERVATIONS ON THE PRESENT SITUATION AND FUTURE PROSPECTS OF THIS AND THE UNITED STATES [the third such article which we pick up in our No.3]. In the March 23 issue [No. 6], Lycurgus observes that, in the form of government "most favourable to the liberties of the people," power is distributed "but no real power given out of the hands of the people."
Discussions of, and articles concerning, state power to collect revenue; conflict with Indians in the Western Territories; Virginia's relinquishment of Kentucky lands; Beccaria's essays on crimes and punishments; organization of various voluntary societies; the "conscious inferiority" that Americans feel toward Europeans; criminal trials; negotiations with Cornplanter; Treaty with the Shawanoe; loss of the ship Halsewell, on her voyage from London to Madras; "Dissertations on Government Paper Money, &c. By the Author of Common Sense"; poetry [including Humphreys' poem on the 'Happiness of America']; paper currency; enlarging the power of the Confederation Congress; activities of Congress, especially concerning currency, commerce and Indian affairs; David Daggett's marriage to Miss Wealthy Munson [No. 31]; Hillhouse's eulogy on Nathaniel Greene; sumptuary laws; extracts from Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations; General Washington's confinement of Captain Asgill
Lomazow 18a. I Mott 31 note, 788. Evans 19831. Item #36624

Price: $1,500.00