IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES OCTOBER TERM, 1955. NO. 10. COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, PETITIONER, V. STEVE NELSON. BRIEF OF INDIVIDUAL AMICI CURIAE. FRANK J. DONNER, 342 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK, N.Y., ATTORNEY FOR INDIVIDUAL AMICI CURIAE. American Communism, Steve Nelson.

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES OCTOBER TERM, 1955. NO. 10. COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, PETITIONER, V. STEVE NELSON. BRIEF OF INDIVIDUAL AMICI CURIAE. FRANK J. DONNER, 342 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK, N.Y., ATTORNEY FOR INDIVIDUAL AMICI CURIAE.

[New York: Hecla Press, 1955]. vi, 59, [1 blank] pp. Near Fine, in original staples and printed title wrappers [light dusting].

Nelson, a member of the Communist Party, was tried and found guilty of violating Pennsylvania's anti-sedition law. Nelson appealed his conviction to the United States Supreme Court, which held that federal law [the Smith Act, the Internal Security Act, and the Communist Control Act] had superseded and thus rendered void all State laws on the subject of subversion and sedition. See, Pennsylvania v. Nelson, 350 U.S. 497 (1956).
The amici were individuals who, like Nelson, had been convicted of violating similar State laws in Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Florida. Donner's brief on their behalf is an illuminating description of America's response to Communist subversion [whether real or imaginary] in the decade after the end of World War II. Item #36811

Price: $100.00

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