ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION AND BY-LAWS. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLORED GRADUATE NURSES. National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses.

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION AND BY-LAWS. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLORED GRADUATE NURSES.

[New York: 1939]. 15, [1 blank] pp. 3-1/2" x 6." Stapled as issued. Tipped-in replacement of Article VI on page 10. Very Good with light wear.
[offered with] N.A.C.G.N. THIS MEMBERSHIP CARD CERTIFIES THAT [ANNIE E. ROBINSON] IS A NURSE MEMBER OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLORED GRADUATE NURSES, 1790 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 19, N.Y., FOR THE YEAR ENDING 1946. MARGURETTE C. JACKSON TREASURER. Pale green wallet-size card. Typewriter has filled in Robinson's name and the year 1946. Jackson signs in typescript. Very Good.

The organization was founded in New York in August 1908 by Martha M. Franklin, a registered nurse. Membership consisted of four classes. 'Nurse' members are those who successfully completed a three-year course in nursing from an accredited nursing school, connected with a general hospital. Associate members, honorary members, and lay members who are "interested in the promotion and welfare of nursing and Negro nurses" are also defined.
"This was an organization dedicated to promoting the standards and welfare of Black nurses and breaking down racial discrimination in the profession. This organization served an important need, as Black nurses at that time were not welcome in the American Nurses Association (ANA). The main purpose of the NACGN was to win integration of Black RNs into nursing schools, nursing jobs, and nursing organizations. In the early years, membership was low and the major achievement was the development of a registry of Black nurses." After several years of active recruiting, the Association became "phenomenally successful. In 1933, the NACGN had only 175 members; by 1949, that number had grown to 947. One of their greatest achievements was their successful lobbying for an integrated Cadet Nurse Corps during World War II. This, in turn, produced a snowball effect; by the end of the war, all but a few state nurses associations admitted Blacks as members. Shortly after the war, the ANA suggested that it take over the functions of the NACGN and that its program be expanded for the complete integration of Negro nurses." [Web site of the African American Registry.]. Item #37009

Price: $450.00