AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, AS ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT, TO PUBLISHER JOEL MUNSELL, 25 SEPTEMBER 1870, REGARDING CORRECTIONS TO AN ESSAY BEFORE PUBLICATION. Joseph P. Bradley.
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, AS ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT, TO PUBLISHER JOEL MUNSELL, 25 SEPTEMBER 1870, REGARDING CORRECTIONS TO AN ESSAY BEFORE PUBLICATION.

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, AS ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT, TO PUBLISHER JOEL MUNSELL, 25 SEPTEMBER 1870, REGARDING CORRECTIONS TO AN ESSAY BEFORE PUBLICATION.

Newark: 1870. 2pp. 5" x 7-3/4." Entirely in ink manuscript on lined paper and signed "Joseph P. Bradley." Munsell's name above the salutation covers The previously written name of Bradley. Very Good.

Bradley, a Rutgers graduate, was a highly respected New Jersey lawyer, specializing in railroad and patent litigation. President Grant nominated him to the United States Supreme Court in early 1870, and he took his seat in March. He served until 1891. His Letter, transcribed in full [words in capital letters are underlined in the original], suggests that Munsell certainly earned his fee for publishing the book discussed here. The book was 'The Centennial Celebration of Rutgers College, June 21, 1870: With an Historical Discourse. Delivered by Hon. Joseph Bradley.' It was printed in Albany by Munsell in 1870. Bradley had a scholar's attention to detail, and wanted Munsell's work to reflect precisely Bradley's thinking.
"You did not quite understand one correction made by me on the title page. That thing which I originally called an APPENDIX, we propose to call a NOTE, and say nothing about it in the title page - occupying the same place as it now does - at the end; - but under the name of a note instead of that of an appendix. Hence. Then, we propose to call the account of the Centennial Exercises - AN APPENDIX. Now, you will see the meaning of my correction on the title page. Calling the account of the Centennial Exercise by the name of an appendix, my name as author of the Address could properly come AFTER the word 'Appendix' as you suggest. It would be better if it could. Perhaps, even now, my name had better come after the word "1870" immediately before the words, " with an Appendix." I agree with you that it is more usual to have the name of the author down there.
"Yours truly | Joseph P. Bradley." Item #37262

Price: $850.00

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