AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, 30 DECEMBER 1936, TO HIS FRIEND EDWARD LAROCQUE TINKER, REGARDING HIS SLOW RECOVERY FROM A MEDICAL CRISIS, WRITTEN FROM SEA ISLAND, GEORGIA IN INK MANUSCRIPT

Single leaf, written in ink on recto and verso. First page with engraved illustration and printed letterhead of "The Cloister | Sea Island, Georgia." Stone has crossed out "The Cloister" and written above it "Cottage 71." Signed in ink "Harlan F. Stone" at bottom of the verso. Very Good.

"Dear Tinker | It was good to have your letter which followed us when we came here a week ago Sunday. They took me to the train in a wheelchair but now thanks to the balmy climate I am walking... I walked two miles. We shall unwind probably until late Jan and then return to my sadly interrupted job.
"Sorry you could not make your trip to Pasadena. It would have been a pleasant change for you both. I enjoyed your tale of Mr. Pal and Shaw. Have you heard of the elderly spinster who attended a party when each guest was to dress so as to indicate the title of a book. Across her lower front was a placard ------ [?]. The answer of course was It Cant Happen Here. Our best regards to you and Frances. Let us hope that the new year will be a better one for all of us and that we shall meet soon.
As ever your friend
Harlan F. Stone"

Harlan Fiske Stone [1872-1946] was appointed to the Supreme Court as an Associate Justice by Calvin Coolidge, and served as such from 1925 to1941, when Franklin Roosevelt appointed him Chief Justice, a position he occupied until his death in 1946. Stone had been ill sometime around December,1936, and had traveled to Sea Island, Georgia, to recuperate. A report in January 30, 1937, stated that he had returned to Washington, fully recovered. His correspondent was Edward Larocque Tinker [1881-1968], a writer concentrating on Latin American culture. Both men were graduates of Columbia Law School, Stone in 1898 and Tinker in 1902. After Stone graduated, the school asked him to remain as a teacher; he did so while maintaining a private law firm. In 1910, the law school named Stone its Dean, a position he held for fourteen years. Tinker likely knew Stone both as a student and fellow teacher. "It Can't Happen Here," mentioned in this Letter, refers to the 1935 novel by Sinclair Lewis. ["Harlan Fiske Stone Society", website of Columbia Law School.]. Item #37285

Price: $350.00