THE LATE GEN'L HOOD'S FAMILY... SOLD UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE HOOD RELIEF COMMITTEE, N.O. John Bell Hood, Theodore Judaica- Lilienthal.

THE LATE GEN'L HOOD'S FAMILY... SOLD UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE HOOD RELIEF COMMITTEE, N.O.

New Orleans: Lilienthal's. 121 Canal Street Touro Building, 1879. Cabinet Card, oblong 4-1/4" x 6-1/2," depicting Hood's family with portraits of the late General and his wife. Copyright information in white script at bottom of the photo; "Lilienthal Artist" at lower blank margin. Very Good. Title, explanatory text, and Lilienthal's prominent logo on verso.

"In 1867 a German-born Jewish photographer, Theodore Lilienthal [1829-1894], advertised the city's post-Civil War recovery through photographs presented at the Paris Exposition as well as to Napoleon III. Lilienthal also promoted New Orleans to northern investors in 1873 through a book of photographs... Lilienthal, considered one of New Orleans's most successful photographers, later involved himself in spreading the truth about anti-Semitism in the photography field by offering to distribute, for free, an article criticizing that practice" [Pollack, Visual Art and the Urban Evolution of the New South, Chapter 3]. "Part of the first generation of photographers in New Orleans, Theodore Lilienthal was the city's most successful nineteenth-century photographic entrepreneur. At the height of his commercial success, from 1875 to 1885, he operated one of the largest studios in the South, and was recognized as a pioneer of new photographic processes. His work as a portraitist and view maker was unsurpassed in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras" [web site of 64parishes, article on Lilienthal].
Confederate General John Bell Hood-- known for his wild bravery, his several serious wounds, and his disastrous defeats at Atlanta and Franklin-Nashville-- married Anna Marie Hennen after the War. After producing eleven children in ten years, including three sets of twins, the General, his wife, and their oldest daughter contracted yellow fever and died.
New Orleans, and particularly veterans of Hood's Texas Brigade, created the "Hood Relief Committee." In the photograph, the ten orphans pose near portraits of their mother and father, with a seat at far left open for their deceased sister Lydia. Printed caption on verso notes, "Every Picture Sold adds to the Permanent Fund for the Education and maintenance of these 'Wards of the South.'" Item #37334

Price: $875.00