TWO AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENTS SIGNED CONCERNING A FORMER CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY MAN WHO EXILED HIMSELF TO MEXICO TO SERVE IN THE MEXICAN ARMY: [1] AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, TO "CAPT. A.A. BRINSMADE," FROM GENERAL JOSE MARIA JESUS CARBAJAL, AT MATAMOROS 13 JULY 1866: "SIR, YOU WILL FORTH WITH TAKE COMMAND OF THE ARTILLERY AT THE FORT CALLED DE COLEGIO AND PLACE THE GUNS IN ORDER." [2] AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED, IN SPANISH, BY SERVANDO CANALES, 19 SEPTEMBER 1866: A PASS FOR CAPTAIN BRINSMADE TO TRAVEL FROM MATAMOROS ACROSS THE RIO GRANDE TO BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS.

[Mexico]: 1866. The first item on lined paper folded to 5" x 7-1/2"; the second, 4" x 8-1/2". Both in ink manuscript, written on rectos only. Old folds, a few shallow edge splits. Else Very Good.

After the Civil War some diehard southerners moved to Mexico and South America. Mexico's Emperor enticed these disappointed Confederates with land grants. Slaves, however, were prohibited, as Slavery was illegal under Mexican law.
Allan Abbot Brinsmade [1831-1910] was one of them. Born in Honolulu when his father was serving as consul for the United States, he moved to the mainland as a young man. In 1858 he volunteered with the Morgan Riflemen, an independent company of volunteers, and served in the Utah War against the Mormons. During the Civil War, he enlisted with the Second Company, Louisiana's Confederate Washington Artillery, and fought in many battles until he was injured at Williamsport. At the end of the war, he went into exile in Mexico and joined the Mexican Army, eventually becoming Lieut. Colonel of Artillery. He later returned to the United States and settled in Houston as a bookkeeper. In 1875, he was in New Orleans as the first Secretary of the New Orleans Stock Exchange, and served as such until October 15, 1895. ["Brinsmade Resigns." The Times-Picayune, New Orleans, LA, October 3, 1895, p,11.]
Jose Maria de Jesus Carvajal [1809-1874] was a surveyor, legislator and liberal revolutionary. He was born in San Fernando de Bexar [San Antonio] and by 1830 was the official surveyor and son-in-law of empresario Martin De Leon. In 1835, he was elected to the legislature of Coahuila and Texas. was elected as a legislator in 1835. He served as secretary and was authorized to publish the laws of the state in English and Spanish, which were published in 1839. Beginning in 1839, he led some anti-centralist revolts in Northern Mexico; in 1846, he commanded a division of the Mexican army against the United States; in 1862, he joined the Mexican liberal army against the French; and about 1864, he negotiated a loan from the United States on behalf of the liberal Minister of Justice Benito Juarez, to aid in the cause. ["Carbajal, Jose Maria Jesus." Handbook of Texas Online. http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fca45. Accessed Feb. 21, 2021. Published by the Texas State Historical Society.]
Servando Canales [1830-1883] was a Mexican soldier who took part in the Battle of Padierna in 1847 and later became a guerilla. After the war, he became involved in smuggling for a time. He later continued his military career, including taking part in the Siege of Puebla in 1862, took part in the Siege of Queretaro about 1867, and was present at the execution of Maximilian. In 1879, he was elected governor of Tamaulipas. Item #37416

Price: $750.00