"GET OFF THE TRACK!" A SONG FOR EMANCIPATION, SUNG BY THE HUTCHINSONS, RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO NATHL. P. ROGERS, AS A MARK OF ESTEEM FOR HIS INTREPIDITY IN THE CAUSE OF HUMAN RIGHTS - BY THE AUTHOR. Jesse Junr Hutchinson.
"GET OFF THE TRACK!" A SONG FOR EMANCIPATION, SUNG BY THE HUTCHINSONS, RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO NATHL. P. ROGERS, AS A MARK OF ESTEEM FOR HIS INTREPIDITY IN THE CAUSE OF HUMAN RIGHTS - BY THE AUTHOR.
"GET OFF THE TRACK!" A SONG FOR EMANCIPATION, SUNG BY THE HUTCHINSONS, RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO NATHL. P. ROGERS, AS A MARK OF ESTEEM FOR HIS INTREPIDITY IN THE CAUSE OF HUMAN RIGHTS - BY THE AUTHOR.

"GET OFF THE TRACK!" A SONG FOR EMANCIPATION, SUNG BY THE HUTCHINSONS, RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO NATHL. P. ROGERS, AS A MARK OF ESTEEM FOR HIS INTREPIDITY IN THE CAUSE OF HUMAN RIGHTS - BY THE AUTHOR.

Boston: Published by the Author. Thayer & Co. Lith. Boston. Price 25 cts. net, 1844. Folio. 5, [1 blank] pp. Leaves detached, otherwise Very Good. The cover is a detailed, attractively engraved scene depicting a train entitled 'IMMEDIATE EMANCIPATION' powered by an engine labeled 'LIBERATOR,' It heads toward the Railroad Station where well-dressed gentlemen are gathered. Tophatted gentlemen also appear in the foreground, engaging in animated discussion. The train flies the flags 'HERALD OF FREEDOM' and 'AMERICAN STANDARD,' the names of abolitionist publications. The train is followed by another engine, this one controlled by a woman, powering a passenger car with the name "LIBERTY VOTES AND BALLOT BOXES."

A popular mid-19th century singing group, the Hutchinsons of New Hampshire were "significant figures in the development of native popular music tradition. In contrast to the prevailing sentimental and minstrel songs of the period, their music confronted social issues and embraced causes including woman suffrage, prohibition of alcohol, and opposition to slavery and to the Mexican-American War. They supported Abraham Lincoln's presidential campaigns, backed the North in the Civil War, performed slave songs to call attention to the predicament of black Americans during the postwar period, and sang in support of women's rights" [Encyclopedia Britannica].
Nathaniel Rogers, the dedicatee, was a lawyer and hard-driving abolitionist. From 1838 to 1846 he was the editor of the 'Herald of Freedom'. This is a relatively early Hutchinson item; the family gave its first concert in late 1840. Item #37502

Price: $1,250.00