IT IS UNDERSTOOD TO BE A SUBJECT OF COMPLAINT ON THE PART OF THE WINCHESTER & POTOMAC RAILROAD CO. AGAINST THE BALTIMORE & OHIO RAIL ROAD COMPANY, THAT THE LATTER HAS REGULATED ITS CHARGES FOR TRANSPORTATION UPON THE PART OF ITS LINE WEST OF THE JUNCTION OF THE TWO WORKS, AT HARPER'S FERRY, SO AS TO DEPRIVE THE WINCHESTER COMPANY OF A PART OF THE TRADE WHICH IT ENJOYED PREVIOUS TO THE OPENING OF THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAIL ROAD BEYOND THAT POINT...

[np. Martinsburg? 1843]. A rare Folio Broadside, 17-1/2" x 8." Two columns, separated by a rule. Bright, unblemished, pristine copy with a horizontal fold. Fine. The 1843 publication date is indicated from context.

Faulkner [1806-1884], the probable author of this broadside, represented the B&O on several other occasions and was the most prominent lawyer in western Virginia. He built a successful legal practice on his skills as a railroad lawyer. The Winchester line ran from Winchester, Virginia to Harper's Ferry [now West Virginia], where it connected with the B&O. That connection caused great anxiety in Virginia: it offered farmers and industries in Virginia's Great Appalachian Valley the opportunity to ship from ports in Baltimore and Philadelphia, rather than exclusively through Virginia ports.
Faulkner demonstrates that the Winchester Line's "complaint is not just." He displays the "table of rates for passengers and principal articles of transportation on the two lines" [AAS description].The B&O has adjusted its rates in accordance with accepted "and very simple and intelligible principles." The Winchester Line's hard times are, as the Winchester Company itself has admitted, "manifestly the result of the general decline in the business of the country." But if the B&O's greater efficiencies and improvements have caused any dissatisfaction with the Winchester's services, that's just the way markets work.
As a member of the House of Delegates Faulkner sought the abolition of slavery in Virginia in the early 1830's, after the Nat Turner rebellion; served in Congress as a Buchanan Democrat; and was attached to Stonewall Jackson's staff during the War. In his doomed battle to end Slavery in Virginia, he allied with Thomas Jefferson's grandson, Thomas Jefferson Randolph, to enact a law freeing all children born of slave parents after July 4, 1840. Had Faulkner succeeded Virginia-- and other border states-- would have been unlikely candidates for secession in 1861. But he lost a close contest. Virginia remained a Slave State and the somewhat reluctant cornerstone of the Confederacy.
AAS online catalogue [BDSDS. 1843]. Not in Hummel, BRE, Haynes, Sabin, American Imprints. OCLC 24205737 [4- Appalachian State, Lib VA, U VA, VA Hist. Soc.], 694518431 [1- Johns Hopkins], 78144832 [1- AAS] as of June 2021. Item #37660

Price: $750.00