PHOTOGRAPH OF THE "BOYS OF THE DAYS OF '61, OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA CHEERING AS THE FIRST CONSIGNMENT OF STONE MOUNTAIN MEMORIAL HALF DOLLARS ARRIVED FROM THE MINT. THE BAGS CONTAIN $50,000 WORTH OF THE NEW COINS AND WERE CLOSELY GUARDED.

[Atlanta?]: Underwood & Underwood, 1925. Photograph of elderly, cheering Confederate veterans arranged in a semi-circle around bags filled with newly minted Stone Mountain Memorial Half Dollars. A pillared building is in the background. The photograph, oblong 8" x 10-1/8", is dated 5/10/25 on the accompanying explanatory caption by Underwood & Underwood, New York photographic firm. With the Underwood ownership stamp on the verso.

Stone Mountain, composed of granite, has a bas-relief sculpture of Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis carved into its north face. The carving was conceived by Helen Plane, a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, in 1909. Sculptor Gutzon Borglum, later of Mount Rushmore fame, started work on the project in 1916. In 1925 he was fired. According to Wikipedia, the coin was struck at the Philadelphia mint in 1925. "Its main purpose was to raise money on behalf of the Stone Mountain Confederate Monumental Association for the Stone Mountain Memorial near Atlanta, Georgia. Designed by sculptor Gutzon Borglum, the coin features a depiction of Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson on the obverse and the caption: 'Memorial to the Valor of the Soldier of the South' on the reverse."
The memorial ran into several snags causing work to be stopped in 1928, and it wasn't completed until 1970. The mountain was the site of the modern Ku Klux Klan's first cross- burning ceremony in 1915 and regular yearly events for about 50 years. Item #37671

Price: $450.00